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Hey everyone!

I've had my puppy for about 4 months now. He's a 6-month-old pug. I love having him around, and really want what's best for him. That being said I'm having a bit of a problem with potty training him and was hoping that some of you may have some advice on how to proceed!

First off, I live in the third story of an apartment building. This being the case, when I got my puppy and started training him, it was very challenging to take him out without him having an accident. It especially didn't help because the breeder I got him from fed him extremely cheap food, making most of it just go through him. That said, I trained him to go in a plastic bin that was filled with kennel chips that I replaced every day. After he got to the point where there was about an 1 1/2 between each time he needed to go, I started bringing him outside. He does a good job, pretty much always goes in the same spot, is well praised for going, and goes every time I take him out. He doesn't have any accidents at night, and hasn't had any accidents in his crate for months.

Here is where the problem lies; When I let him roam around the apartment, or even his play pen he consistently has accidents unless I am taking him out every hour or so. I know he can hold it just fine because he has shown me he can, but he just doesn't. He has always been suborn when learning anything, and is hardly motivated unless food is involved which has made training quite the challenge when trying to get him to work with me without the price of this food.

I'm really not sure what to do. I've been working on his potty training for months and while it has gotten better, everyone I've talked to says they almost never have accidents and they've spent even less time than I have on trying. Any advice would be much appreciated. I can't spend all day hovering over him because I have work to do for part of most days.

Thanks in advance! :yo:
 

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I'm on the third floor of an apartment building, too! It's a pain, but I'll say that my puppy has no fear of elevators (unlike my family dog, who has come out to visit) and I also do a lot more stairs than I used to. ;) We also have a ton of carpet, so that was something to contend with during potty training.

I'll tell you the same thing I tell everyone, that it sounds crazy but you can try starting with a very short, 20 minute timed "free time" after each successful potty break. After 20 minutes, puppy has to go into a cleanable area (our hardwood-floor kitchen is gated so that worked), into the crate, or literally onto a lap where she wouldn't have an accident. If she didn't fall asleep in another 20 minutes, we went out for another potty break...but she usually fell asleep and took a nap for an hour or so. Another potty break, always, whenever she woke up. And repeat throughout the day!

You can gradually increase the timing to 25, then 30, then 40 minutes, and you're going to get longer gaps of time whenever your puppy naps to get work done. Are you working from home? Due to your puppy's age, I do think that you'll be able to increase the time between crate/cleanable floor/nap breaks relatively easily and get to that point where you won't need the timer anymore. It's possible that using the litter box caused a little bit of confusion for her as far as where is the appropriate place to go, so your job for now is to prevent as many accidents as possible to avoid her reinforcing the habit.
 

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The litter box may have created some confusion. Have you removed that completely so you can focus on "outside is the place to go?"

IF he's consistently having accidents when you let him roam, don't let him roam. If you can't 100% watch him, crate him. If he can only go an hour without having accidents, make sure to take him out every hour when you can supervise. The time will increase as he learns and gets older. If he is crated, most pups can hold it at least 4 hours because they are inactive, and typically sleeping.
 
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