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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 5 month old mini dash (male) and i have a large yard (fenced in )which he excercises in. The next door neighbor has a female pit bull which they also let out to excersise When both dogs are outside they socialize at the fence and my dog wont obey when i call him. Hes too fast and i cant catch him. Im afraid the other dog will mall him through the fence with her claws. There are spaces in the fence. How do i teach my dog to come?
 

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Provide an adequate training environment. The backyard, in the face of distraction, with an owner in chase, is not a place to start training.

Do that, then memorize all the stickies in the training forum.
 

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The stickies are at the top of each forum page, BEFORE you get to the threads. They have lots and lots of good info.

Here's the thing: a dog has to be taught something with no distractions first. When they have learned it in a place with no distractions, then you can start training the same thing in areas that have a few distractions. When they have mastered that, you can train it in an area that has more distractions.

So, what you are trying to train is "recall" (coming when called). You should start training this INSIDE your home at a quiet time, not a lot of activity going on. You have to practice. You need to make coming to you when you call seem like way more fun that what she's doing. AND, you have to reward her when she gets to you.

When she can do it inside, then you can try it in an area with a few more distractions, like maybe a garage (if you have one), because you can usually hear a little more outside noise from the garage. When she can do it in the garage, try the backyard, BUT NOT WHEN THE NEIGHBOR'S DOG IS OUT. That would be too much of a distraction.

After she gets good in the backyard, you might try the front yard, because it might have more distractions. Eventually, you can try it in the backyard WITH the other dog out. The point is to introduce the training and practice it WITHOUT distractions, and then to gradually introduce distractions.

A couple points: never call her to you ("come!") when you need to do something that she doesn't like, like a bath, or clip her nails, or go to the vet. And, never punish her when she comes to you. Things like that will cause her to associate recall with something bad happening.
And, you can use a long leash, like 20 feet or more, to teach recall. The long leash gives her the feeling of freedom, but you still really have control.

In the meantime, I'd take her out when the other dog isn't out, OR, on a leash, so you can keep her away from the other dog.
 

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You might want to put some chicken wire up along the length of the fence bordering the neighbor's yard, so that your dog can't stick a nose/leg thru the fence and get bitten. You can get a 50 foot roll really cheap.
 

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Have mentioned this before go to local hardware or feed/farm supply store and pick up 50 ft thin Nylon cord and a dog snap and make your own long lead then when turning dog loose let him just drag loose lead and it's just much easier to catch dog when necessary. It's not a training tool, it's a control tool, when dog is done doing duty just reel him, no calling and jerking it's just a way for you to get your dog. A tight buckle collar is needed so dog can't slip head loose. Oh the lead can be any length 20-30-40-50 it's up to you.
 

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The long line isn't a fix-all solution but it can prevent your dog from self reinforcing while you are teaching a good recall. I would definitely second the suggestion for a long line. This explains how to both properly teach a recall and use a long line for recall training: http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/Lesson6.html

However...
Have mentioned this before go to local hardware or feed/farm supply store and pick up 50 ft thin Nylon cord and a dog snap and make your own long lead then when turning dog loose let him just drag loose lead and it's just much easier to catch dog when necessary. It's not a training tool, it's a control tool, when dog is done doing duty just reel him, no calling and jerking it's just a way for you to get your dog. A tight buckle collar is needed so dog can't slip head loose. Oh the lead can be any length 20-30-40-50 it's up to you.
On a puppy (especially a small breed one) I would not suggest using a long line with a collar at all. The trachea of many small breeds, especially as puppies can be very prone to injury. Harnesses are a much safer option, even for an adult dog.
 

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The long line isn't a fix-all solution but it can prevent your dog from self reinforcing while you are teaching a good recall. I would definitely second the suggestion for a long line. This explains how to both properly teach a recall and use a long line for recall training: http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/Lesson6.html

However...


On a puppy (especially a small breed one) I would not suggest using a long line with a collar at all. The trachea of many small breeds, especially as puppies can be very prone to injury. Harnesses are a much safer option, even for an adult dog.
Yes, the line as I said is just a control program and not used for training in yard etc. It's kinda like the umbilical lead used in home with housebreaking pup etc (never used that method myself) big difference is length of cord.

Now as far as trachea I'm not gonna disagree, but again harnesses are tools I've never used as most of the time they end up fighting/chewing their way out of them. All for safety though. The whole idea with a cord is to grab end of cord and work your way hand over hand to the dog, not grab cord and pull dog to you. At least that's the way I've found productive and easy on the pup/dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok i installed (4) 25' rolls of chicken wire on top of the wood fence. So those 4 rolls + a staple gun = $200 Still cheaper than a vet bill
 

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Just curious, but why do you believe the neighbor's dog will maul your dog with her claws? Is it just because she is a Pit? Or does she behave aggressively toward your dog? I was just confused because you didn't mention why you were afraid, you only said they socialize which has a positive connotation toward it... well, at least to me... when I think of dogs socializing I think of them just checking each other out or playing, not fighting? Sorry if I missed something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Recently my daughter and her dog were attacked by a pitt bull. Her dog needed 13 stiches, thats why i dont want my pup near that monster
 

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Well, I wouldn't say a Pitbull is a monster. In my opinion there are no bad dogs, only bad owners. First, if you dog isn't obeying your recall and you're afraid for his safety, keep him on a leash. Train in a safe (and distraction free) environment first and then try the fence & pit.

Second, why don't you try and talk to your neighbor about your uneasiness with his/her pitbull (without calling it a monster of course). He may be a responsible owner, or actually a bad owner and you know what to expect and make decisions out of it. Also you might want to socialize your dog with other dogs so he becomes accustomed to other dogs.
 

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Pitbulls are not monsters. The monsters are the owners who train their dogs to fight and don't give them proper care and training. ANY dog can be aggressive. I have heard of some pretty bad stories of labs and golden retrievers attacking people. Just because one dog does something doesn't mean every other dog will. Also, many "pitbull" identifications are wrong, there are many breeds and mixes that can look like pitbulls. I am not saying that happened in your situation, but many cases of "pitbull" and "rottweiler" attacks were not actually pitbulls and rottweilers. These identifications are made by eye witnesses or policemen, neither of which has any qualifications for identifying dogs breeds. Many square-headed labs and lab mixes can be mistaken for pitbulls.

I understand that you are upset that your daughter was hurt, but your negative feelings should be directed at his owner, not the dog.
 
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