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Thanks to you and your room mate for rescuing her.

House training: Make sure she doesn't have the opportunity to have an accident. Tether her to you with a leash if you can. Use baby gates to keep her in the same room with you. If you can't supervise her, have her in a crate or pen. Feed her and take her out on a regular schedule. She's likely been punished for having accidents in the past, which has taught her to go hide when she potties. Clean all the places where she's had an accident with a good enzymatic cleaner.

Not coming when called: Love is a leash. Keep her on a leash outdoors if you don't have a securely fenced area for her. My chain link fence has buried chicken wire along most of it, because I had a dog who would dig under it. Work on her recalls until they become automatic (this class starts February 1 https://fenzidogsportsacademy.com/index.php/courses/12090 and is worth checking out). A shock collar shouldn't be used without expert training, and even then, only after a LOT of recall training.

Calming her down: Training! Short (like five minutes at a time) training sessions throughout the day. Nosework is another great way to wear them out (this nosework class starts February 1, as well. https://fenzidogsportsacademy.com/index.php/courses/13342 ). A couple of walks a day would probably help, as well. At night, have her crated or in her pen. If she says she needs to potty, take her out on a leash, let her potty, then right back into the crate.

Don't try and "correct" her, simply offer her an alternative activity. If she's chewing on something she shouldn't be, offer her something acceptable to chew on, like a toy or long lasting treat. he tethering and crating will also help with the destruction, since if she's supervised, she can't get into anything.
 

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Look up "crate games". Also, feeding her in her crate will help.
 

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I know that some dogs are more sensitive to chocolate than others, so it's probably the same with grapes. For dogs that are sensitive, raisins are more dangerous than fresh grapes, since they are more concentrated.
 
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