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A friend of mine has decided to have her dog spayed. I think the dog is 7-ish now. While discussing it, I said it would be best to wait 3 months (the dog is in heat right now). However, the vet said he'd do it in one month. I personally have had trouble with this.....we once found a stray who started bleeding a week after we found her, had her spayed after a month (per vet's advice). She bled badly, gave everyone a good scare, and had to stay at the vet's office an extra day. So I can't think that this is a good idea. So, is there any info I can print out stating that you should wait 3 months? I don't know if she'll take my word for it.
 

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waiting 3 months sounds fine to me I can't see why it MUST be done only a month after a heat cycle it's not like shes going to be in heat again that soon.
 

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3 months is the common sense best time. Heats are six months apart, therefore the tissues are least inflamed at the 3 month mark. Vet be damned, it's the parents decision.

Honestly, I can't seem to find anything printable that's reputable (which is odd, I can usually find even the most obscure references) but it's late and I'm tired, which may have something to do with it. The common sense argument works best here. Along with the explanation that engorged tissues and blood vessels present a potential for excessive bleeding and infection.
 

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waiting 3 months sounds fine to me I can't see why it MUST be done only a month after a heat cycle it's not like shes going to be in heat again that soon.
that's not necessarily true...i had a Sibe that had the weirdest heat cycles until she was bred at 3 yrs....she came in the 1st time at 9 mo, then 12 mo, then 20 mo, then 2 yrs (those are ruff estimates as it's been many yrs since i had her and don't really recall the whole in-betweens of the cycles, but i do know it went similar to that, 9 and 12 being the only ones i know for sure)....after her first litter she came in every 6 mo like clockwork....

but i agree, a longer wait is in order....my vet says at least 6 wks to 2 mo.....and at 7 yrs she should know what her cycles are like, unless she just got her from someone else and this is her 1st heat w/ her....
 

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I spayed my female pom one month and some days after her heat. But I sorta had to because I had the neuter-now program coupon that was going to expire soon. But everything went fine, no bleeding badly or stay an extra day in the vet office.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
and at 7 yrs she should know what her cycles are like, unless she just got her from someone else and this is her 1st heat w/ her....
Nah, she's had the dog from a baby, and she's like a child to her. She wants to avoid age-related reproductive issues, which is why she's having it done now. I think she'll go along with waiting 3 months. I found a vet that uses only inhalant anesthetic, and does very meticulous spays, so I think she'll use him. Bloodwork first, of course.

OK, another question: is inhalant-only anesthetic really safer than injectable anesthetics? I know the pet comes out of it much faster, but are there any real benefits? The dog is a Dal with diagnosed urine crystals.
 

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Inhalants in general are ALWAYS safer than the injectable anesthetics.

Of the inhalants there are two types, Isoflurane and Sevoflurane. Iso is safe but Sevo is even safer (and what is used in human medicine). Most vets use Iso (it's WAY cheaper) but a know a few who will use Sevo with an older animal. If it's an option definitely go for Sevo.

The vet I work for (I'm a tech btw) uses Sevo exclusively and we've had great luck with it.

Other things to find out...what are the pre-meds that they use? Acepromazine used to be the most common and it's still used somewhat but is being phased out because it dilates the blood vessels which can cause an issue in dogs with slower heart rates or heart problems. Generally we use Ace with young healthy dogs and older dogs, large breeds, sighthounds, and any dog we suspect might have a heart issue gets diazepam (Valium). The other pre-med we give is butorphanol or brand name torbugesic, again pretty safe and given with either the ace or diazepam.

The other thing you want to find out is what is the dog put under with? You need an induction agent when using an inhalant, at least if you are being safe about it. You put the dog under with the induction agent, then insert an intubation tube and hook the gas to that.

The best of the best for induction is Propoflo, again it's what's used in human medicine and it clears the system wonderfully quickly. You only have a max of maybe 5 mins from when the dog goes under to when it will wake up again without the gas being on. Telazol and a Ketamine/Diazepam cocktail are also safe but stay in the system much longer and cause a rougher time coming out of anesthesia. Still safe drugs but if Propoflo is an option I'd go with that.

Hope this helps!
 

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Pretty much what Xie said. I'm a tech too and we actually use Isoflurane, not Sevo but we've never had any issues.

We also use butorphanol and ace which are both typically safe. We use propoflo sometimes, but generally a mix of ketamine and diazepam. We only use telazol on aggressive dogs or cats because we can give in in the muscle instead of a vein, but try not to because of the slow wake up time.

Anyway, surgery done without an induction causes more pain for the animal because they are simply asleep on gas with no induction agent on board...it's not really a good practice.

With proper bloodwork done inductions are generally safe...I agree that propoflo is the best - we almost always use it one older dogs (6 plus).
 

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LOL yeah Telazol is my favorite drug in the world when we have an aggressive dog or cat in. Pop them in the butt and it's sleepy time :). I'm a bad tech though, if I could just Telazol about 90% of the cats we see I'd be a happy person. I own two cats and I love them but I find cats in general are evil minions sent to scratch the heck out of techs. That could just be me though, I know one tech who LOVES the evil cats.
 

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LOL yeah Telazol is my favorite drug in the world when we have an aggressive dog or cat in. Pop them in the butt and it's sleepy time :). I'm a bad tech though, if I could just Telazol about 90% of the cats we see I'd be a happy person. I own two cats and I love them but I find cats in general are evil minions sent to scratch the heck out of techs. That could just be me though, I know one tech who LOVES the evil cats.
Wow could I have said it any better myself?? The vet I work with (obviously) loves animals, but is not a huge cat fan. He has much less tolerance for evil cats so it's telazol all the way. We do use it much more with him for cats because if they're even slightly grumpy we use the good 'ol telazol. :) I also have two cats...they are good, but about 90 percent of the cats we see re just plain mean.

I guess the problem for me is that if most dogs were as aggressive as the cats we see they would be put to sleep with no questions asked. :( Silly evil cats.

(Sorry to go WAY off topic!)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I don't know what drugs he uses specifically. I'm sure she'll ask closer to surgery time. He is the exotics vet, so whatever he uses is safe for birds and bunnies. I used him to fix some feral cats, and the info on their paperwork said that a tube was inserted, and MIGHT have listed the drug name....I'll have to check. Some vets itemize the bill, so the drug names are listed, some don't.

Penny was spayed by a vet that "masked down" the animals with isofluorane, no induction agent (but she did use a painkiller). She had to use Telazol on Silka, though (evil cat!). But not on the other cats we brought to her (not evil cats!). I read after that that masking down is generally frowned upon by most vets....oh well. Penny doesn't seem to be scarred for life :D .
 

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Penny was spayed by a vet that "masked down" the animals with isofluorane, no induction agent (but she did use a painkiller). She had to use Telazol on Silka, though (evil cat!). But not on the other cats we brought to her (not evil cats!). I read after that that masking down is generally frowned upon by most vets....oh well. Penny doesn't seem to be scarred for life :D .
It is really mostly frowned upon because the animal is just on gas and not very deep under anesthesia. One of our vets does it for older dogs and cats when we do dentals because they are short and relatively painless. It just really stinks when they do extractions and the animal twitches...we have to ALWAYS give an extra pain med so they aren't in too much pain afterwards.
 
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