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Anyone have any experience with training a dog to not cross a line in the yard?

Here's the reason I ask. I moved to a new house and have a 7 week old puppy. The yard is mostly secure, but there are a couple of areas that could pose problems as the fence is short enough to jump over or there are holes. In each of those areas, there is a small, 2 inch concrete 'wall' around it (they used the areas for planting a garden). I want to teach my pup to not cross over the planter 2" wall so she never gets to the bad areas of the fence. She hasn't ventured far enough from me to get to those areas yet, but it's coming soon.

Thanks!
 

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Not really. Certainly not with a 7 week old puppy (puppies should have a drag line) and never with you inside and dog outside. .

You might look into invisible fencing but your dog is too young for this and it involves installation and the dog wearing a collar all the time that interacts with the underground fence.

A regular fence is the answer and fixing the fence you have.
 

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Fix the fence. You have a period of adolescence coming up on you, where the dog may push boundaries, blow off recalls, and "forget" training you have previously done, and the absolute best way to keep the dog safe during this period of brattiness is to take away the options of escaping or exploring on its own.

But, yes, there is a way to train dogs to respect a "line drawn in the sand" so to speak, or stay in their yards, but...don't forget a dog is a dog. Some dogs will forget that training for the right distraction. Some dogs never get it in the first place. And I would never, ever, recommend leaving the dog outside unsupervised...not to mention that other dogs/animals could possibly get into your yard if your dog can get out.

But, yeah, just fix the fence. Really, it is so much easier and safer.
 

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^^^I would say ignore the post above as nothing but one person's anecdote.

Restrictions enable people to train better and set habits for the future. You have no idea what the OP's living situation is and telling people to just 'supervise better' and calling it abuse to restrict dogs... Is going to get some dog killed.

It may have worked for you, but that is not grounds for saying your dog is the definition of what other dogs will do, nor does it give you any expertise in what is best for other owners.
 

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My advice would be to keep your dog on a harness and a long line. If she approaches those areas, call her away from them. If you are unable to call her away, just stop her with the line and redirect her to the areas you want her to be. Dogs learn boundaries by interacting in that space and learning what is reinforcing, but a form of management such as a long line will guarantee your success. If your puppy's time outside with you is fun and structured, and it never happens beyond the planter line, then she will grow up not 'thinking' about that boundary or crossing it (unless there is something super enticing over there). Also look up on youtube "kikopup boundary training" for some cool ideas.

The easiest solution would be to fix the fence.
 

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lol. my 9 month old terrier is going to bite me because I stop her from crossing the sidewalk. Wow. I'll just risk it I guess.
My bad, I meant "some dogs" for both cases.

And before anyone starts with the "but the dog could chase a squirrel no matter how well it's trained" just save your breath. Mine doesn't. Period. And if she ever did, well, there are risks in life. Your kid could bolt off into traffic too, why don't you have chain around their neck just to be SURE?
You lucked out with your dog. I recommend that most people absolutely NOT trust their puppies until training and maturity take effect. You are also implying that if people's dogs chase squirrels then 'oh well!' better let them get hit by a car than put a leash on them? How many dogs have you actually worked with? Your post screams ignorance and lack of experience.
 

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Today, when I let her run in the local park next to our house with the neighbors dog, they play keep-away with a ball. The neighbor's dog quickly learned that all he need do is run across the sidwalk to the median side (he's noy trained to recognize the sidewalk), and my Border locks up the brakes before the sidewalk, and will not persue further.
Wow reliably locking up the brakes sounds really magical. How did you accomplish this ? aside from "no", "stay here" and physically (gently, i presume) stopping her when she was a pup. Did you use aversives as she got older and tested the boundaries ? or did it all just come together .. magically. You haven't mentioned anything so far about R+.
 

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Honestly, I believe prey drive is not much other than a cop out.
You've obviously never owned a dog that has it.

To the OP, you CAN train a dog to respect boundaries, but should never trust the dog to be left alone and expect them to not cross the area. Your puppy is young enough that if you start now you should be able to teach her, but I'd still recommend a long line just in case. Better safe than sorry. The best idea is to fix the fence. Patch up the areas that need it if that's all you can afford right now.
 

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Common sense people.

The key to restraining a dog, is to not restrain him.
LOL.

Let me guess. You're another one of those people who's going to post poor advice to an Internet forum full of long-time dog owners, professional dog trainers, people who have trained multiple dogs for a plethora of dog sports/activities such as agility, obedience, rally, and IPO and call it GOOD and TRUE FOR ALL DOGS because this one time you managed not to get your dogs run over by a car because "NO, FIDO, STAY HERE" without using a leash or fence, and then stick vehemently to this poor advice despite multiple people more experienced than yourself advising the contrary.

If someone had the "common sense" to use your advice, they would very likely get their dog killed.
 

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That's funny. You're pre-supposing the people here are more experienced than myself. It's easy to call yourself a professional dog trainer on the internet. There will be a few who try what I say and see it's possible, and the rest will follow the alarmist, purist BS you subscribe to. To each his own. You give your opinion, and I'll give mine. Did I attack you?
I am quite certain that many of the people here are more experienced than you....based on the fact that you basically advised the OP to LET YOUR DOG RUN FREE with knowing very little about the actual situation.

When your opinion is...for lack of a better term...quite horrible, based on anecdotal evidence, and can cause people who are brand new to dogs to let their dog who has no business being off-leash go off-leash and possibly have an accident, then I'm going to say something about it.

And, quite frankly, I find these inflammatory conversations highly entertaining.
 

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That's funny. You're pre-supposing the people here are more experienced than myself.
You're pre-supposing they're NOT ??? pot, meet kettle ???

There will be a few who try what I say and see it's possible, and the rest will follow the alarmist, purist BS you subscribe to.
Not necessarily "the rest will ..." . You're overlooking the possibility that some will try what you say, and in so doing put their dogs in harm's way. Mmm I dunno about you, but safety and well-being come first and foremost whenever I give out internet advice. Your advice could be downright dangerous, if not lethal in a very real number of instances. Not to mention heartbreaking for someone who had just acquired a new pup and all of the responsibilities that go along with it. Food for thought if you happen to have a conscience, and don't wish to be the proverbial bull in a china shop.
 

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Ah hah! You're only 'quite' certain, but not positive. Whatever. If you read any one of my posts, you'll find that 100% of them referred to young pups, not older dogs. And I stand by my methods. If you start with an 8 week old canvas, and that dog isn't listening to you and staying by your side after a year, you just SUCK at dog ownership/training. And prey drive, squirrels, other dogs, or whatnot will all be BS excuses for lack of dedication, plain and simple.

So basically, if you raised your dog from a pup and are still having these problems....you're pretty much a failure.
My positivity in my conclusions is growing with each of your posts...
 

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Ok, good. Stick your dog in a padded container and poke a few holes in it so they can breath. Better safe than sorry.
So, to you, it's either, OMG LET YOUR PUPPY RUN WILLY NILLY AND FREE THATS THE ONLY WAY THEY'LL BE A REAL DOG! or the other extreme of PURISTS KEEPING THEIR DOGS LOCKED UP AND NEVER ALLOWED TO DO ANYTHING! ABUSE!

Have you considered there is a middle ground of, "Hey, I'm going to keep my puppy on a leash/safe in a fenced enclosure until this dog is properly trained so that an accident doesn't occur and my dog gets killed. Also, I will take into account the individual traits of my dog and recognize that my dog may not be a good off-leash candidate, or may not be a good off leash where he will encounter other dogs/people/wildlife/{insert whatever triggers the dog here}."
 

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Nobody said anything about a padded container other than you.

I'm absolutely puzzled by your claim that "professional dog trainers know exactly what I'm talking about". You know, thousand of professional trainers will adamantly, and routinely, recommend long lines and leashes to the general public especially when training young pups in open areas. Virtually ALL of them, worldwide.

Well, and then there's you. Pretty much standing alone. Special snowflake I guess. Move over Cesar, this guy's about to take over the pedestal of stardom..
 

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There's a difference between reading, and comprehending. Obviously you SUCK at the latter.

At least you have your special snowflake status to fall back on. Golly, a 5 month pup that can spin, and drop a ball in a basket. When is your premiere on tv ? :eyebrows:
I miss all the fun and opportunities to show off my 5 month old puppy's training and to pointedly comment so my signature shows up.

I swear this place brings out the worst in me. I'd never dream of using those sorts of things in any kind of peeing match - until someone starts telling me how much more experienced than me they are, and how they know better because (blah). I'm not even that impressed by my titles! But at that point I start asking for proof like titles and certifications and wanting to know how many people they've had pay them for their help.
 
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