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My old girl Queenie had a huge seizure this morning. It was scary AF - I didn't even realize it was a seizure right away. I thought she was choking to death on something. Afterwards she passed out for a while, then was very disoriented, but after some sleep, she seems to be more or less back to her usual self. She's never had one before that I know of. The whole thing was extremely freaky, but apparently as far as tonic-clonic seizures go, it was bog standard.

Took her to the vet, of course. They did bloodwork and everything was normal despite her age (at least 16, probably older, and she's a not a small dog), so it's not kidney failure, diabetes or pancreatitis, or anything in that vein. I was concerned about an intestinal blockage as she'd chewed up some fabric the day before, but she's having normal bowel movements and eating and drinking, and apparently her abdomen felt normal when palpated, so the vet told me not to worry about it. I don't think she could have gotten into anything poisonous, and she hasn't injured herself. So it's a mystery.

He said it's very possible it was a one-off event, as she's too old for this to be the onset of typical epilepsy, so we'll wait and revisit the problem if she has more seizures in the future.

Which brings me to my actual question - he sent me home with diazepam and instructions to dose her if a seizure seems imminent or if she has multiple in a row. I was actually asleep when she started convulsing, so I didn't get a good sense of what her pre-seizure behavior looked like. Has anyone had experience with this? Have you been able to tell when your pet was about to have a seizure?

She's such a good old girl. I just want to keep her comfortable and happy to the end.
 

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Awww, what a sweet face!

I'm sorry to hear about that scary experience! I don't have any personal experience with a dog that has seizures. But I do know what they look like. Typically the dog seizes up (really, for lack of a better term) and is standing and slightly trembling in place, or they can fall. Snapping their teeth, drooling, kicking their legs, or having their lips pulled far back can happen. The medication can help but otherwise you sit with the dog and wait it out. I know this sounds horrible, but you can youtube videos of dogs having seizures. I watched a few in the past just to educate myself on what they look like.

My colleague has a dog with epilepsy who is by all accounts a normal dog. She has a seizure once or twice a year. A friend of mine has a poodle who is 16 years old and had a similar experience to yours. The dog never had a seizure until a couple months ago. At the moment he is as fine and dandy as a 16 year old can be.

I hope you guys won't have to experience this again!
 

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Thanks, Canyx.

She had another rough one early the following morning, almost exactly 24 hours after the first. I was pretty doom-and-gloom about our prospects after that, as you can probably imagine. But she hasn't had any episodes whatsoever since. So, who knows? I guess at her age, all we can do it take things one day at a time.
 

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Thanks, Canyx.

She had another rough one early the following morning, almost exactly 24 hours after the first. I was pretty doom-and-gloom about our prospects after that, as you can probably imagine. But she hasn't had any episodes whatsoever since. So, who knows? I guess at her age, all we can do it take things one day at a time.
Seizures in old dogs are a concern and especially more than one. One day at a time is a good philosophy. I know Diazepam (Valium) is a good muscle relaxer. I had a standard poodle when I was a kid that would have seizures. He would get staring and glassy eyed before an episode but not always.
 

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I hope Queenie is doing OK. Just throwing in my $0.2 for you and anyone else wondering about this question, because we've sure thought about it a lot. What 3GS has seen is similar to what we have seen. We never get much warning. Our dog will go glassy eyed and not respond if his name is called, often he will start drooling so quickly and profusely that it starts dripping before he really even starts, and that's our hint one is IMMINENT. He also has a very particular tell that doesn't happen all the time, but when it does, occurs before his eyes go glassy. He will look over his shoulder towards his tail like there's something sneaking up behind him. If he doesn't respond to his name then, we know to expect a seizure within a minute.

Usually by the time we have a hint one is going to happen, it's too late to do anything but keep him safe during the attack, even rectally because he's already clenched up. We give him his valium the moment he's no longer actively seizing.
 
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