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Hi everybody! I'm a first time dog owner and due to some circumstances, I ended up with 2 puppies. As crazy as it is, it hasn't turned out that bad. I have a 9.5 mth male and a 8 mth female, she is the one with the problems.
I got her spayed about 2 mth ago, she was in the process of potty training, but during her post op I had to let her pee inside the house as outside was very wet (rainy season, heavy storms). I've reached a point were she holds overnight as I "crate" her inside the bedroom, I open the door early in the morning and she will go outside to the grass. But during the day she won't hold it and she will go inside the house. The male holds all day until I get home and open the door, then he will go, at that moment, I'll find 1 or 2 "accidents" inside the house, I can't stop her or take her out as I'm not there.
My schedule is very irregular, but if the male has learned to hold it during the day as well as during the night, I'm just wondering what to do with her to get her on the same track as he is. What worries me more is that she's more an adolescent than a puppy, so it will be more difficult.
There's an open laundry room inside my house where she could pee during the day, but she does it about 3 feet away, the male goes there when he needs to.
Thanks for your help and suggestions.
 

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Sorry, I'm navigating from a smart phone, so -t's difficult to load and read all as easy as in the PC. I just read the sticky note regarding no more potty threads. Well, my case is very particular, but I'm sure I'll find some clues in the related posts quoted in the sticky.
Thanks!
 

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How long are you usually out during the day? If it's a reasonable amount of time, then you could crate her during the day. She may not hold it during the day because she doesn't know she's supposed to. If she's in a crate, however, she'll likely sleep when you're gone and she'll be less likely to soil the area in which she's sleeping. This all depends on how long your dog can hold it when at rest.

Even if you can't crate, you should probably confine her to a limited area during the day. At the very least, it's easier for you to spot and find accidents. When you do take her out, take her to the same spot every time. When she goes, reward her with treats and praise. Do this as much as you can when you are at home with her. When she goes to the bathroom inside the house, don't scold her. Just clean it up, and make sure it's with an enzymatic cleaner like Nature's Miracle so the smell is really gone.
 

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I agree with lisahi.
You're right, the spaying, and peeing inside may have thrown her off. But, now, just go back to potty training basics and start over.
So, when you're gone (at work?) confine her/them to a small area of the house, if you don't want to crate her. Some folks don't want to crate all day, and then overnight, too. I'm actually one of those people! :) But, lisahi is right, most puppies/dogs sleep a good portion of the time you're gone, especially if you limit their movement. So, it's really not THAT bad.

You could use the laundry room. Block it off with a baby gate, so she is only allowed in that certain area. Hopefully, the floor is easy to clean, laminate or tile. Clean any messes with an enzymatic cleaner.

And, when you ARE home, potty train vigilantly. Take her out every 1-2 hours. Some people may say every 2-4 hours, because she's actually older, she should be able to hold it longer. BUT, IMO, anytime a puppy is not acting like they're potty trained, there's no harm in starting over. And, even if she doesn't actually pee or poop every time you take her out, you are still laying the foundation, and saying the magic potty words. And, if you find there are absolutely no accidents or close calls when you're home, and taking her out every 1-2 hours, try every 2-3 hours.

One big thing with potty training is keeping them in your sight at all times. That way, you can see any signs of her having to go, being agitated, sniffing excessively, partial squatting, circling, etc. AND, if you always have her in your sight, and you see her start to go, you can interrupt her, and rush her out, thus no accident.

It's all about preventing, and managing, so you don't even give her the chance to have an accident (when you're home, at least). And, as she gets better, you can start giving her a bit more freedom in the house.
 
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