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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
First time posting, I'd heard about the site so I figured "why not?".
So it's in the title. I have 3 dogs (two of which do not live with me, the one that does is a 9 yr old Cocker) and I am seriously considering getting a Samoyed, but I am really wondering if that is the right thing to do. My rationale is this:
1) Being a student is time consuming. I am a professional trainer and have trained over 200 dogs, and have worked in the behavior modification department with dozens of dogs at my local animal shelter, and as a trainer I understand the amount of time that needs to be put into daily walks, romps, runs, socializing, and training. My potential Samoyed would be looking to get his/her CGC by 6 months, my own ability willing. Competition and Rally would soon follow.
2) It's a big deal getting a puppy! This is an animal that will be with me for at least 12 years, and will be under some stress when I go to vet school and take him/her with me and beyond. It's an honor and responsibility being a dog owner, and I wonder if I can do it.
3) Potential stress for my Cocker. Ravi (the Cocker) has several medical issues, and when my Golden and Aussie come down to visit during breaks and the summer, I feel that Ravi feels less important due to the other dogs getting a lot of attention and goes after his paws and ears even more because of it (a big medical no-no for him). A new puppy could quite possibly bring about the same stress levels in him, regardless of my spending extra alone time with Ravi to let him know how loved he is.

This would be the first dog that is actually MINE. The Golden and Aussie are my moms, and the Cocker is my dads. He'd get brushed every day/every other day, and would want to get into dog packing on some trails once a week.

Can a student do it? Or would someone in my position be giving this amazing animal less than what they deserve?

Thanks,
Groucho
 

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I don't suggest that any student take on a dog like a samoyed. I'm sorry to have to tell you that, but you'll be amazed at how much effort a puppy really is. If you want one, get an adult.

Samoyeds are a really cool breed and I actually know a few people who have them. I would get a dog from Polar Mist if I were still interested. She's an excellent breeder and she's on the West Coast. Gorgeous dogs. In Canada, I'd get a dog from Celtic Frost. <3 They also do sledding with their dogs.

Sammies are a very interesting breed and don't really calm down until they're older, like maybe five or so. They're clowns and while they are more biddable then most of the artic breeds, they're not biddable like a herding dog.

They need an astounding amount of exercise to really get tired. Far more then an average dog.

Although, they are one of the few non-herding group dogs that can hold a herding title <3 <3 Again, love these dogs.

Make sure your breeder does health testing and shows. Not many people do anything with samoyeds but show them these days, unfortunately. Heart issues are cropping up in the breed, and while they are generally well structured, you don't want anyone breeding a square dog. Samoyeds are supposed to be longer in the back and thus have a rectangular look about them.

I love the biscuit colored sammies <3 <3 <3

Samoyeds take alot of work to train. You have to be *very* patient, because they seem to think that everything is hilarious. One of the things I really liked about them, honestly. Some sammies can be not-so-patient with other dogs and some sammies can be very shy. Make sure your breeder is honest with you about temperament issues in their lines.

I'll have one, one day. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ah, of course.
So the amount of time needed to dedicate to the dog (especially as a puppy) would vastly exceed the amount of available time a full time student has?
50% of me completely agrees while the other 50% is the arrogant twenty-something who thinks he can do anything :p...
Part of what makes me drawn to Sammies is their goofy nature AND how gentle you must be. With my 3 dogs I don't even have an "ah-ah" that I use for them; I'm 110% positive.
Now, if I were to get a Sammie in early May when school just got out, it would give me an entire summer to be with it, day in and day out, leading up to the next semester in August. I would be looking for early/mid afternoon classes, giving me the entire day to study and be with the puppy.
Is the verdict still the same? Not nearly enough time? If so, fair enough.
Thanks,
Groucho
 

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I'm really happy you're coming here to ask for opinions before you get the puppy. With that said, something in me says that if you're asking, you already know the answer. It's obvious that you have a level head and that you're experienced with animals, but you've pointed out three negatives/hardships to getting a puppy and you're pretty spot on with all of them.
 

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Awww! I can tell you really want a puppy. But, can you afford 1500.00 for a puppy? They're a VERY expensive breed and that 1500.00 is a pet quality puppy, not one that you would show. I know, because I almost got one, but backed out because I realized they were too much dog for me at that time.

Samoyeds are a really high energy breed. They won't suddenly grow up in a summer and they don't care if you have seven classes and a part time job. ;-) And quite frankly, puppies are EASY compared to an adolescent samoyed. That's when they really need lots of training and attention.

Adolescent samoyeds go through a phase where they forget everything you have taught them. They also go through a fear period at this time, and require extensive socialization.

Plus, realistically, where are you going to be in five years? Are you going to be able to find a job immediately out of college and care for yourself and a dog? What about if you have to get a job while taking classes? Then where would that leave your dog? What if you can't find housing that you can afford that will allow you to have pets?

What if you have a serious emergency and your sammy bloats (very common, unfortunately)? How will you pay for it?

How will you pay for dog food? How much time will you have for training classes? Those will be at least $90.00 a class, and I suggest every dog owner go through at least two basic obedience classes.

Dogs are alot of work and they're very very expensive. You should wait until you're out of college and have a better life plan before you introduce something that requires so much responsibility. :)
 

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I'm a little worried about the Cocker. I assume he chews and digs at himself in reaction to stress? My mom had a poodle like that. I think a puppy may be a lot of stress for such a dog, leading to far worse chewing. An adolescent dog may be even worse.
 

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Have you considered contacting a Samoyed rescue and offering to foster a dog? That's a good way to find out if it's the right dog for you and if it isn't then you just wait for someone else to adopt it.
 

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Have you considered contacting a Samoyed rescue and offering to foster a dog? That's a good way to find out if it's the right dog for you and if it isn't then you just wait for someone else to adopt it.
That's a great idea! That way you could see your Cocker's reaction, too. And, if it doesn't work out, you've still done a wonderful thing for a dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The question pertaining to my Cocker: it is all medication/allergies/response to medication. It sucks for him, so I just do my best to keep his mind OFF of his paws (belly rubbin', walks, etc.).
As far as training classes or food go, I am fortunate enough to have 1) a fairly wealthy family and 2) a friend who happens to be a Blue Buffalo representative, classes and dog food are literally no issue for me, of which I am very thankful for. I have spoken with me mum, and she is willing to tack down anywhere from 2-3k for a Samoyed. For me, monetary issues are nonexistent, it all comes down to the TIME. Do I have the time to give this animal the care and attention it deserves? This lady I met had a Border Collie who was the bane of her existence. He chewed everything and was driving her insane. I find out he gets MAYBE 1 walk per week, and almost never sees other dogs. A Border Collie. I would never hit anyone, but that just pisses me off to no end, and swear to Odin that I will never come anywhere NEAR to the way those kinds of owners treat other sentient beings.
This Samoyed rescue idea... interests me... I shall do some research.
Thanks,
Groucho
 

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I had 2 dogs in school, one of which came to me as a 6 month old puppy. I am a firm believer that rather than any particular set of circumstances automatically being bad for a dog or puppy, it is the person that matters. If you are dedicated and motivated enough to figure out a way to make it work and follow through with it, I think almost any situation can work. You just have to honestly assess if you are or not.
 

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Hi everyone! My husband and I planning to get Samoyed. We love to have Samoyed. We also know it's needs time and patience with them. Just now we are hoping to have baby and it might be twins if God permits it. Is Samoyed is good outdoor? We have small apartment, no backyard, so we will need him/her to go outside to walk,run, excercise,play outdoor often. We have the will and want just scared in someways if we have twins will we manage to take good care of Samoyed on this situation. If we have him/her around 2 1/2 or 3 months and try to have regular routine. Will they be good? Hows your experience with yours? Is it good for us now to get Samoyed or better for now to get smaller and a bit less of attention for grooming who shed less so we can have time to walk and everything with the dog?
 

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Baby puppies can be overwhelming. Baby humans can be overwhelming. Both at the same time... well, you couldn't pay me enough....

I'm a bit confused, though. You ask if they do well outdoors, but then say you live in a small apartment with no yard. If you don't have a yard, then the dog will be spending the majority of their time inside.

Are you currently expecting, or are the human babies sometime in the future? Which would come first, the baby puppy or the baby humans? Samoyed are fairly large dogs, and a rambunctious teenage puppy can accidentally step on or knock down a small human. Another thing to consider if that baby puppies put their mouths on everything (and I do mean everything...). Baby puppy teeth making contact with human skin while playing hurts!
 

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Hi @LeoRose, thank you for for response. would like to know how Samoyed behave outside.. on walks, around people, animals... I know it depends on their training but generally is Samoyed easy to walk with or they tend to pull the leash, run and play. Just to have idea 😊
 

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Hi @LeoRose, thank you for for response. would like to know how Samoyed behave outside.. on walks, around people, animals... I know it depends on their training but generally is Samoyed easy to walk with or they tend to pull the leash, run and play. Just to have idea 😊
Like most spitz type dogs, they can be very independent, with a fairly high prey drive. They are not super biddable dogs, like some of the herding or sporting breeds. Training needs to be positive and consistent. NO off leash activities outside of a safely enclosed area until they have a good recall (as in, you can call them and they will come 99% of the time in any situation).

One other thing to mention is the grooming. As a double coated breed, they will shed. Copiously. It's even worse during the spring, when they "blow" their undercoat. Normally, they would need a thorough brushing at least once a week. When blowing their coat, they might need to be groomed several times a day to remove loose coat and prevent mats.
 

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Ok.....I was a Mechanical Engineering major. I recall the pressures of studying, classes, labs, projects while balancing part-time jobs. Classes, labs, commuting, cooking, work, cleaning, sleeping..........consumed much of the day. As a graduating senior I was operating on about 4 hours sleep each day.

The nutshell question is really not based on your desire or experience, but rather based on your time.

How much time do you dedicate to studies? How much time in class? How much time for sleeping? How much time for celebrations? How much time for cooking, clean up, household chores? How much time for commuting? How much time for your professional dog training? It all adds up. Remember, the day is finite in length.

Frankly, IMHO. You would be much wiser to hold until after graduation. Then you will have some loose time. But possibly not much, because at that point you may be beginning a new job, have a girl/boyfriend, fiance', spouse or baby on the way....... Life has a tendency to FUBAR all the best plans.

My ultimate point. Consider not only your available time today, but also the available time in your near future.
 

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Knute, it took me a minute to realize that you were talking to the OP, who hasn't been on since 2012, and not the new poster who revived the thread.
 

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Nuts........sorry. I wasn't paying attention to the post dates. I also made the mistake of not reading the entire exchange.

Nevermind.
:(


Got sucked into a Zombie Thread.....back from the dead
 
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