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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I have a 14 week old labradoodle showing signs fo what I can only guess is hip dysplasia. I am confused as he has been showing these signs since about 11 weeks, and everything Ive read says its too early for a pup to have hip dysplasia.

Background: I got this pup from what I cam to find out to be a dodgy breeder (long story), he has microphthalmia and when I rang the vet who did his original vaccinations with the breeder, I was told that the vet thought the breeder shouldn't be breeding and that there were congenital issues. This is what has made me worry about hip dysplasia.

Symptoms: sometimes has difficulty getting up, bunny hopping when tired, sometimes unable to go up or down stairs, hips swiveling (not sure of correct term, but sort of swinging from side to side), weakness in back legs.

We have a vet appointment anyways next week, but I'm worried now, and worried about he much or little I should be exercising him.

Does anyone have any insights? experience? advice? anything?

Thanks to anyone who has taken the time to read
 

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Hip dysplasia is characterized by a hip socket that doesn't fully fit/cover the ball of the femur head. Moderate hip dysplasia often doesn't show symptoms until the dog is mature, because the poor socket shape causes cartilage wear and inflammatory problems that get worse over time and use. But if it's severe enough, you can absolutely see symptoms in a young puppy, because the joint is barely functional at all. That might not be what it is! But unfortunately, you can't rule it out just because of his age.

My best advice is - if your vet does discover that this is dysplasia or another chronic issue - to ask for a reference to a reputable canine physiotherapist, rehab specialist, or chiropractor (depending on what's available in your area) and work with this specialists to create a customized plan of exercise and conditioning that will support your dog's needs and help keep him as comfortable as possible. It might have to wait until after initial treatment if your vet thinks he needs surgery or another procedure to improve his quality of life, but doing the right exercises (and avoiding the wrong ones) and keeping the dog lean can do a lot to improve pain and keep a dog with structural issues healthier for longer. You'd essentially be building extra muscle to help support the compromised joints. Just, seriously, do it with a professional. Just like with human rehab/physio, you can do more harm than good by experimenting with exercises that aren't right for him, or over-exercising, even in ways that are considered safe and healthy for other dogs.

Good luck, and I hope it's something you can get effective treatment for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your reply and advice, greatly appreciated!

Yes I will see what the vet says and the look Physio/ rehab/chiro.

Do you have any ideas of what else it might be?
 

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Sadly no, and it's against forum rules to speculate about something that hasn't been seen by a vet, since it could lead to dogs getting delayed veterinary care or the wrong treatment. But I do hope you get answers soon!
 

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It's something of a long shot, considering your location, but you can see if there is a vet near you that does PennHIP testing. The PennHIP x-rays for hip dysplasia uses a compressed view and a distraction view, as well as the usual extended view of the hip joints, and can be done as early as 16 weeks. AIS | PennHIP
 
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