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My husband and I just recently got a puppy. This puppy is only 10 months old, and by recently I mean we have had him for three or four months already. We finally got him potty trained but now we are having a real big problem with him chewing up EVERYTHING! He has multiple toys and raw hide bones to chew on. He chooses to chew our outside furniture cushions, he tore the screen out of our screen door, and not to mention the multiple holes he has dug outside in our yard! He has plenty of water outside with plenty of shade. He doesn't spend that long outside either. He is costing us way too much stress! We don't know what to do. Somebody please help us.
Also, we have a real problem with him jumping up on our one year old son and others. If we cant get something done, we may have to get rid of him. We don't want to get rid of our "furbaby" but we just don't know what else to do. Thanks in advance!! :wave:
 

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Sounds like he's not getting enough exercise (this could be physical or mental) if it's an intelligent dog breed then maybe they aren't getting enough mental stimulation and digging holes in the yard is because he's bored and not being supervised. Remember your dog is still a puppy even if he's like 70 pounds, what breed is he? Also if he's jumping give him a conflicting command like sit (this way he has to sit and won't jump)
 

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At ten months old, as kcomstoc mentioned, it's likely the puppy needs more physical exercise as well as mental stimulation. A dog that is worn out, both physically and mentally, is less likely to engage in nuisance behaviors like digging and chewing.

For now, I'd add in more exercise as well as some mental stimulation, like games or training. I'd also restrict the puppy's access to anything that you don't want destroyed. Crates and ex-pens can be your best friends until a puppy has settled down into adulthood. If the puppy is unsupervised, why let it get to things it can destroy and get into trouble? I definitely would not leave a puppy that age in the backyard unsupervised. He's bored out there and finding ways to entertain himself...he doesn't know that furniture is not a great chew toy and that digging holes is not a great way to entertain himself.

Jumping, again, I would try to not give him the opportunity to jump on the 1 year old. Separate them if you can't be right there to supervise and perhaps back up to having the dog on leash when they do interact until you can work on training the dog to sit or do a down when they meet. I tend to teach my dog(s) that very small children (and cats) are simply a distraction they are to ignore. I do this by keeping them on leash and giving them treats when they ignore the cat or small child. At the same time, I teach the child how to properly interact with the dog. And never, ever, ever leave a child that young unsupervised with any dog, no matter how gentle. Children than age lack the physical coordination to be gentle with a dog and accidents can happen.

A training class could really help here. It would help wear out your dog mentally as well as give you some advice and tools to use outside of class. I'd look for a trainer outside of the usual big box stores who trains locally and participates in dog sports and try to get recommendations. :)
 

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Thanks to you both. Taylor is a lab retriever mix. He's very hyper. When he does try to jump on someone, I do give him the "sit, stay" command. He does well for a little while but then his hyperactivity gets the best of him and it seems he can't help himself.
 

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Okay you're not listening to the other posters that provided you great advice. The fact that the you would consider giving up a puppy for well acting like a PUPPY is outrageous,. They told you the dog needs more exercise and stimulation and your reply was that you practice sit and stay? WALK the dog and run the dog. HE needs 2 45 minute walks PER DAY Also, can you take him to doggie day care one or two days a week? that will help drain energy. If he's being "HYPER " ask yourself if you're doing your job as a pet owner and IF you are than crate him with something to calm down for a few minutes and speaking of crate, you it while you're away and the dog is along. GET INTO A ROUTINE. If you need more help PM me and I will help you resolve this issue.
 

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when you said :" it seems he can't help himself. :" it's a very true statement .. he can't at this moment help himself .. it takes time to build longer focus and attention span... the fact that he sits at all in an excitable moment ,, is that your training is getting through and he is wanting to do as you ask... but hard to contain himself for a longer time so your on the right track give it time and experience for the pup... if he gets up (put the people on pause with a smile) walk your puppy away and come back with a sit.. (smile at the people and resume) puppys always have excess energy they don't know what to do with themselves.. let a puppy shake that energy off a little so they can refocus on the task and accomplish it, if you need for him to sit for an over extended time...
 

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Okay you're not listening to the other posters that provided you great advice. The fact that the you would consider giving up a puppy for well acting like a PUPPY is outrageous,. They told you the dog needs more exercise and stimulation and your reply was that you practice sit and stay? WALK the dog and run the dog. HE needs 2 45 minute walks PER DAY Also, can you take him to doggie day care one or two days a week? that will help drain energy. If he's being "HYPER " ask yourself if you're doing your job as a pet owner and IF you are than crate him with something to calm down for a few minutes and speaking of crate, you it while you're away and the dog is along. GET INTO A ROUTINE. If you need more help PM me and I will help you resolve this issue.
??????
This is the OP's first post here...
 

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@wespom- it seems that you have either misread my post or something. We do take our dog for walks, we do play with our pup. The reason I posted this thread was for advice of what I could do MORE of! I don't WANT to get rid of my puppy. However, if I can't get him to quit jumping on my son or being destructive I am going to have no other choice. My landlord is not happy about him being so destructive. Especially since he is rearing our screens out if our doors. He is crate trained. He goes into his crate at bedtime an when he's being excessively hyper.
Again, thanks for all the great advice. We will be sure to extend his walks and play more "fetch".
 

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Teach him things too. Look up some puzzle games and toys for dogs, train him things. Mental exercise is equally important as physical exercise.
 

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puzzle toys are great for mental stimulation and will get him to think which will tire him out...also maybe mix up the fetch by throwing the ball and then when he brings it back give him a command like sit, stay, lay down and things like that and when he does them say good boy and throw the ball. Physically and mentally draining him. Labs are really difficult dogs (energy department) until about 2 months and they can be nippy and bitty until that age too (sometimes even older). I agree on keeping the child and dog separated as much as possible a lab with a child is just asking for trouble...they can accidentally nip the child (it would be an accident) and then you blame the dog and it gets put in a shelter for just being a lab puppy. :D just be careful and don't leave them alone together even for a second.
 

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I wish I could tell everyone that getting a puppy is no different than having a toddler in the house. I would never leave my toddler unsupervised. Same goes for a puppy. Even now that my dog is 7, there are moments in every day (predictable because I know this dog!) when she has to get her ya-yas out and if we're not supervising her, she will make her own fun. :)

The good news is that most dogs grow out of the destructive phase if you handle it well. No harsh reprimands--that will just get him to do it when you're not looking vs. right in front of you. Keep up the supervision, trade up if he's going after something he shouldn't, use Grannix bitter apple spray on the things he goes to repeatedly, and teach simple commands like "Leave It!" and "Drop it!" so that you can get him to leave something alone or drop it on command. "Give it to me" is also useful, e.g. if the dog picks up a shoe to chew, give the command and reward/replace with something else he might want. Supervision, redirection, and lots of repetition really do work to get rid of destructive behavior.

free online training text has lots of info at www.dogstardaily.com
 
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