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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, after the loss of our lab last year, we are looking for a new dog. I am really interested in the Vizsla, but I know there are many other breeds out there, here is the criteria I would like to have in a dog- keep in mind that I am willing to invest some time into training with a professional trainer, but not over do it:

Large Dog (Over 65 pounds)

Good with children

Moderately Active (One that can do with 30 minutes of running 2-3 times a week)

Trainable

Good with other animals and small dogs (will not likely see them as prey and kill them)

Not a strong hunting or tracking instinct (Not likely to chase after something and cannot be stopped)

Good with strangers (not timid)

Not likely to bite

Short Haired

No special grooming needs

Not prone to too many diseases or other health problems

Doesn’t drool too much

Not a strong hunting or tracking instinct (Not likely to chase after something and cannot be stopped)

Non Aggressive

If anyone can help me out I would really appreciate it- this guy will be a member of our family for a long time, so I want to make sure that I find a good one ;)
 

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Well, the Vizsla IS short-haired.

Many of your requirements are a function of training and exercise more than the breed. (I'm not sure how you "overdo" training.) Some of them will depend on the quality of the breeder.

I spent time with Vizslas before I'd ever heard of Hungary. They are lovely, affectionate dogs. They are also energetic bird dogs with fairly high exercise demands. A 30-minute run 2-3 times each week would not cut it unless the Vizsla is comatose.

Is your heart set on a purebred? Are you wanting a pup? Would you consider another lab? If not, why not? (I ask because some of the things that people complain about with labs are amplified in Vizslas.)

Your dream dog may very well be a retired greyhound.
 

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Ron beat me to the reply, and a grayhound is a good idea for what you want and do not want in your new dog. The dog you are thinking about undoubtably is a very attractive breed and an eye catcher to me. But this one lady really had her hands full in obedience class with me. That dog is full of energy and reserved energy lol!! But if you had a lab and are determine, I am sure you can do it! Some of the things you are looking for all in one dog is near impossible to me. But you can compromise a little and make it work:)
 

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I think the collie suggestion and the retired racing greyhound suggestions are both very good ones. A Vizsla, based on your criteria, would be a very bad choice as they are both highly active dogs, and have a tenancy to chase prey and can be hard to control off leash without extra training.

I've never owned a collie, but I have known lots of them, and they are the sweetest, most gentle, laid back creatures I can imagine.

Also as a side note, I think most dogs in your size range (65lbs or more in weight, but without a number of potentially inherited health problems) are going to want something closer in the range of at least 30 minutes of exercise per day. If this is something you cannot do, you may have to be willing to compromise in other areas, but NEVER get a dog if you are not 100% certain that the dogs energy level matches yours. I promise you, if you do, it will be nothing but grief for both of you.
 

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I think the collie suggestion and the retired racing greyhound suggestions are both very good ones. A Vizsla, based on your criteria, would be a very bad choice as they are both highly active dogs, and have a tenancy to chase prey and can be hard to control off leash without extra training.
I've heard retired racing greys can also have a strong prey drive.
 

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I've heard retired racing greys can also have a strong prey drive.
They can, and that is true. My experience with them is that as long as they are adequately exercised and are well trained they listen very very well to their owners. My experiences with Vizslas is that you can have a bullhorn and a porterhouse and they don't give a damn about you if they are more interested in something else. This goes in particular for young Vizslas. I've seen two Vizslas (from different owners) attempt to literally scale a fence to go after a ball despite the owners doing everything to get the dogs attention. I have never seen a retired greyhound attempt, or even look like they are considering attempting, to do such a thing.

Now it should be considered most agencies that place retired greyhounds do not place them in households with cats, simply because they CAN have a prey drive, and there is no reason to tempt them all day long by having some feline flicking them in the face with their tail. :p However, the OP mentioned small dogs, and I know a couple families that have retired racing greys with smaller dogs with no problem. So I guess it depends on what the OP means by "other animals". If the dog is going to be passing smaller dogs or cats or whatever on walks, you likely won't have a problem, but if its going to be living in the house with a cat or ferret or something of that nature, then it may not be a good match.

Either way, its something that the OP should consider IMO, because it meets a number of the requirements they had.
 

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I don't understand... why weren't the dogs seperated based on size? (I'm not familiar with dog parks, save for the one that I seldom go to, where dogs are seperated based on size.)
Not all off-leash parks have a 'little dog' area. =(
 

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Greyhounds CAN live with cats and small animals if the right measures are taken, but they should still never be let offleash in an unfenced area. If you want a dog that will be reliably biddable when not on a leash, a greyhound is not for you.

I'm putting in a second vote for the Smooth Collie, but I just wanted to say that 30 minutes two or three times a week is not going to be enough for that breed. There are very, very few large breeds who would be happy with just a couple of 30 minute runs a week. Most require a couple of 30 minute walks a day, especially in their adolescence.
 

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Honestly, virtually all of those requirements are training related (which is needed with all breeds) and temperament (which you can find in all breeds). Large dog, no shedding, and doesn't drool much are the only breed specific requirements you mentioned. I would go to shelters and meet individual dogs. You can easily find a large adult dog that doesn't shed or drool and has all the temperament characteristics you're looking for. The rest is entirely based on training.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you to everyone who replied. We currently have a chihuahua- against a dog of that size, he doesn't stand a chance. We have a medium sized yard, probably about 1/4 acre. I would love to find a rescue that fits the bill, however this dog is not only for me, and the other family members are really wanting to get a puppy- which is harder to find in a rescue. Shedding is a concern. I live in San Diego- does anyone know of any dogs out there that meet some of these criteria and need a home? A purebred is not important. There will be someone home with it at all times.
 

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A retired racing greyhound is a good suggestion, I'd only caution you if you have small children; I've heard that greys have pretty thin skin and a delicate frame (relative for a dog of their size of course), and rough housing kids can injure the dog (though I'm sure that's true of any dog in a rough enough situation). I'd suggest a standard poodle personally...they seem to meet a lot of your requirements. But I also think you could do well to go to the local shelter and adopt an older dog.

Large Dog (Over 65 pounds): Standard poodles vary from 45-70 lbs in males, though I've seen larger.

Good with children: A lot of this depends on early socialization, but all of the standards I've known have been kind, affectionate dogs.

Moderately Active (One that can do with 30 minutes of running 2-3 times a week): I don't think you're going to find many large dogs with this low an exercise requirement. (But a retired racer does fit the bill here) Most people I've talked to seem to exercise their poodle for about an hour a day of walking.

Trainable: Standard poodles are some of the smartest, most trainable dogs you'll come across. Just don't let them get bored...

Good with other animals and small dogs (will not likely see them as prey and kill them) Standard poodles were originally bred as water retrievers and flushers of birds, they don't have a high prey drive.

Not a strong hunting or tracking instinct (Not likely to chase after something and cannot be stopped) Not really a tracker or a hunter.

Good with strangers (not timid) All of the standards I've seen have been extremely charismatic dogs, though I know a lot of that depends on the owner.

Not likely to bite

Short Haired: The poodle's short curly coat doesn't really shed, and can be shaved down.

No special grooming needs: The tradition poodle look isn't a requirement, many of the people I know who own them just opt for the easy short shave.

Not prone to too many diseases or other health problems: Can be prone to epilepsy.

Doesn’t drool too much: They don't in my experience.

Not a strong hunting or tracking instinct (Not likely to chase after something and cannot be stopped)

Non Aggressive
 

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I'm so sorry to dump this in here but there are no perfect breeds, but a lot of perfect dogs sprinkled here and there in all breeds. These perfect dogs when whelped get lucky and they end up with perfect owners who love and raise/work them properly to bring out the perfection.
Good Luck
 

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I'm so sorry to dump this in here but there are no perfect breeds, but a lot of perfect dogs sprinkled here and there in all breeds. These perfect dogs when whelped get lucky and they end up with perfect owners who love and raise/work them properly to bring out the perfection.
Good Luck
I agree. I have a cocker spaniel that I picked up at the local shelter. He is 1.5 yrs old so he's still a young dog yet he doesn't seem to have the high energy that cocker spaniels usually have which makes him perfect for me. If I was the type to run 5 miles a day, he would not be the best dog.
 

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Greyhounds are couch potatoes in my experience (judging from my friend's dogs). Also, hers get along great with the cats (they have shown no want to chase hers and are confused when one cat will get upset and swat at them). The rescue she got them from was willing to let her take potential ones in and see how well they did with the cats (as with any breed, individuals vary).

And yes, you haev to look at the individual dog too. Not sure how good example my dog is cause she's not pure but I'm pretty sure she's 75% husky and if she had true husky energy levels I'd be in super amounts of trouble (and she's not an escape artist either and will stay in the yard and I can take her to off leash dog parks and not worry she'll run off on me and not come back). She's 75% husky but aside from the easily bored thing she seems to only retain the good traits (good with other dogs and people, very friendly, very cute, open to new experiences and liking to go places, goofball). I mean she even gets along with my cats and considers them her pals (and huskys are notorious for prey drive. I know the rescue around here pretty much just flat out says no homes with cats for their huskys).

You could try going to rescues especially ones that foster, they could better tell you the temperment and energy requirements of each individual dog (if you can get family members to get over the want a puppy. I'll tell you one thing, you want a puppy you are going to hvae to do more excercise than a few times a week with any breed, least of the size you want, maybe toy breed puppies might be happy with what you request. Puppies are a *lot* of work).
 
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