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Hello,
I have a 11 month old Siberian husky,
She is still very much a puppy but is very well behaved & usually listens.
I have begun to encounter a problem with begging.
The problem isn't a problem at home, where I just send her away & thats fine.
The problem is when we go to my husbands mothers house for dinner.
We are very close with his family, & visit often.
To start, they have 2 other dogs who eat from the table,
They sit there & bark for food & get the food.
I don't allow such behaviour.
I have tried my hardest to let everyone know not to feed my dog at the table.
& to my knowledge she isnt being fed there.
But she is putting her head on the table, licking things.
I want to know what I am supposed to do?
Should I sit in the other room with her while we eat?
Christmas is around the corner & that means there's going to be a giant table with lots of places for her to try & beg, while other dogs are being fed..

I really dont know what to do!!!
Someone please help!

She used to just run around & play while the other dogs begged & had no idea what was going on at the table.
 

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Do you have a crate that you could bring with, and crate her during dinner? Or can you put her in another room with a frozen peanut butter stuffed Kong, or Antler, so she can be occupied during dinner? Or leave her at home?

The good news is that dogs learn things in relation to situations/locations. She won't necessarily pick up begging at the table, if she never gets anything at your home, and only sees it at your parents.

You could also teach her a "go to your bed" command, or go lay down command, and have her get away from the table when eating.
 

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The good news is that dogs learn things in relation to situations/locations. She won't necessarily pick up begging at the table, if she never gets anything at your home, and only sees it at your parents.
This is true. Dogs don't beg for food from me because it doesn't work. Our collie, Teddy, used to beg from my husband and kids only, because it did work. When the family was eating dinner together, Teddy did not beg (probably because I was there). When my husband ate alone at the table, Teddy would bark at him until my husband finished eating and gave him his plate. My husband was well trained by the dog. Luckily, Teddy had a cast iron stomach and no allergies.

If your dog is allowed to beg at your parents' house, just be sure you and your family do not feed her. I would also use the off command to keep her head off the table. Actually, in this case, I would crate my dog in another room (out of sight of the table), give her a bully stick to chew on, if she didn't whine, howl, and bark the entire time.

If her crate behavior was nerve-wracking, I'd stick with the dog's immediate family not feeding her and the off command. At that point, I'd treat it like a visit to Grandma, like when kids get candy and lots of sweet and chips and soda that they don't get at home. Kids look forward to those visits, but they don't expect nutritional or behavioral standards to deteriorate at home, especially when their parents don't allow that.

I'd also feed the dog before I went there, if it is a dog who won't eat any and all food offered, hungry or not.
 

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They sure do learn from individuals. My dogs were trained by me to stay out of the kitchen when I asked, whether it be cooking or eating.

Just last evening I looked across the table....... clear to the other end at the captain's chair and realized that seeing my little dog Leeo perched on the chair.... sitting quietly and very proper was so normal that I had to remind myself this WAS NOT ALLOWED! I then looked at my Dad and he was snickering with a crumb of food he was placing in front of my little Leeo.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't bring her to your mother-in-law's house anymore. It's her house, so what she does with her own dogs isn't in your control, but if your dog is picking up bad habits there, I'd leave her at home. Chances are, if she's exhibiting begging behavior and your mother-in-law table-feeds her own dogs, she is getting treats from the table, but that's just a guess. If going there is a big part of your life, consider bringing her crate and keeping her in it while people are eating. Or outside, if that's an option.
 

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They sure do learn from individuals. My dogs were trained by me to stay out of the kitchen when I asked, whether it be cooking or eating.

Just last evening I looked across the table....... clear to the other end at the captain's chair and realized that seeing my little dog Leeo perched on the chair.... sitting quietly and very proper was so normal that I had to remind myself this WAS NOT ALLOWED! I then looked at my Dad and he was snickering with a crumb of food he was placing in front of my little Leeo.
This would honestly aggravate the crap out of me. A dog that you're training gets extremely confused when other people countermand your rules. You can spend months training your dog to a certain set of rules, only to lose a lot of ground when someone else gives in and lets the dog do whatever. My cousin lives with us, and I've had to have multiple conversations with her about hugging and petting the dogs when they jump up in greeting. When five 50-70 lb dogs start jumping on you, it isn't fun, and I've been training them to greet me calmly for several weeks with a lot of success. I finally had to get a bit aggressive about it (with my cousin). People often don't have any concept of how 'just this once' can really screw up your training. Dogs don't generalize well, so if they are occasionally reinforced for doing something you don't like, chances are they will never stop it. Now, I own my house so it's easier for me to lay down the law (not sure about your living arrangements and didn't want to assume), but if you have a frank talk with your dad and let him know why this causes you problems, hopefully he'll understand and go along with your rules.
 
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