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Hi, I don't have any dog experience yet. But plaining to own a standard Bernedoodle. This is going to be
my first dog breed. But I am still little confuse as this is relatively a new dog breed. Anyone here having the
experience of Bernedoodle? Please let me know, Are these dogs are good for the families? I am waiting for some
sincere advices.
 

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Bernedoodles aren't really a dog breed, per se....they're a mix. Because they are a mix and the don't have a standard like officially recognized breeds, it can be difficult to determine what their temperament and final appearance is going to be. Personally, most -doodles I've met have been rather hyper unless they were advanced seniors, but again, there's no standard so there's probably a wide variety.

You should also thoroughly research any breeder you want to purchase from, as Bernedoodles are a "designer dog" and there are many breeders who would rather pump out numerous on-trend litters a year with little regard for temperament or health so they can make as much money as possible. That's true for any breed, of course, but it seems to occur more often with the doodles.
 

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As mentioned, they aren't an actual breed, but a crossbred. A first generation cross will be 50% Bernese Mountain Dog and 50% Poodle. Sometimes a first generation cross will be back-crossed to either a Berner or Poodle. Be prepared to do some heavy-duty grooming, since crossing XYZ breed to a Poodle does not automatically mean the resulting pups won't shed, and coat upkeep (brushing, combing, bathing, and possibly clipping) is important.

Also mentioned is health. Both Berners and Poodles can have some serious health problems. Breeders should be testing for issues in both parent breeds.

These are the recommended tests for Berners:
These are the recommended tests for Standard Poodles:
  • Hip Dysplasia (One of the following)
    OFA Evaluation
    PennHIP Evaluation
  • Eye Examination
    Eye Examination by a boarded ACVO Ophthalmologist
  • Health Elective (One of the following tests) (One of the following)
    OFA Thyroid evaluation from an approved laboratory
    OFA SA Evaluation from an approved dermapathologist
    Congenital Cardiac Exam
    Advanced Cardiac Exam
    Basic Cardiac Exam
 
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Along with what others have said, they are kind of a crapshoot when it comes to health and temperament depending on the breeder and how much they actually know about breeding other than throwing two dogs together.

The few I have met are okay, decent dogs. They are not considered a breed, just a mix of two breeds. They started off very cute as puppies, but those pretty tan points faded from the poodle genes as they grew, so keep that in mind for some of them. You could always look into parti colored Standard Poodles, keep it in a "doodle" hair cut and honestly nobody would know the difference.

If you decided to get one.. keep something very important in mind. They are going to be expensive outside of just buying the dog.

These dogs absolutely need groomed from a very young age (as in, a decent breeder should already be socializing to grooming and have done a "puppy groom" before even sending home at 8 or so weeks) until they are old and gray. They will need training to tolerate this. They will need to go to the groomer every 6 weeks minimum (unless you plan to keep very short) and brushed several times a week with a good slicker and comb. Doodle prices to be groomed are pretty high. They are high maintenance dogs to groom. Think $75-$150, maybe even more. (depending on location, size of dog, coat etc) per adult coat groom. Maybe you already knew this, but I find a lot of doodle owners had no idea and plenty of bad breeders give very bad info in this area. :)
 

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Your chances of getting a well bred "Bernerdoodle" are very, very low. It's rare for good breeders to allow their dogs to be used in doodle crosses. Good breeding is especially important with Berners because they as a breed have a mountain of serious congenital health problems, so if you want a healthy dog, you need to get a Berner from someone who is assiduously researching their bloodlines and selecting for health and longevity.

My advice would be to decide whether you like Poodles or Berners more, and then get the one you like better. Or get a different breed that typically has the traits you like about Berners and Poodles.

If you're willing to roll the genetic craps shoot by getting a doodle from a crappy breeder, you might as well get a shelter dog, feel good about saving a life, and save yourself a thousand bucks or more on the purchase price. You can put that cash in a savings account for possible future vet bills or training or whatever.
 

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Atlas: Blue APBT , Archie: APBT/lab mix, Shadow: GS/hound mix, Hector: Retriever mix
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The only advice I will give here is to research this mixed breed a good bit before purchasing. I will be honest and tell you that I hear alot of bad things about all of the "doodle" dogs.

They are very trendy dogs at the moment, so the Vets offices and groomers see them frequently. I have a very good friend who is a Vet tech and she says she honestly hates to see any "doodle" dog coming Lol! They tend to be very, very hyper, hard to train, unruly and can be snappy. I have been told the same by a groomer. You can also look through pet forums and see many pet owners posting about training difficulties with these dogs.

That said ......I am in no way advising you not to get one. I have always had APBTs ( pitbulls) and Chihuahuas.....both of which have reps for being aggressive.....I've personally never had any issues with any of mine. Just be aware of personality traits that are common with the breed of dog you purchase, so you are prepared for any issues that may arise. Also, be prepared for the grooming, care costs and health issues associated with the breed.

If your heart is set on this type pup.....I say go for it! :)
 
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