Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello Dog Forums :wave: My name is Kitty Katt...aka KittKatt :wink: I've been lurking for a while and I'm learning a lot, so I feel very confident about getting/adopting a dog soon.

I'm currently about to graduate from college, and in about a year I'll be moving out of my house and going to grad school, so I'm looking for a companion to keep me company and take this next stage of life with me.

I've researched a lot of breeds, and I'm really fond of medium sized dogs. I don't like delicate excessively fragile pooches ( I hate my bff's maltese with a passion). I LOVE Corgis, but I'm scared that their too much for a first timer like me. I also really like Samoyeds, but in addition to the grooming, I'm moving to Texas and I don't want my baby to overheat. I was hopping you all could pick a great breed for someone like me!

I guess it really boils down to:
  • My favorite breeds are : Pems, Cardigans, Samoyeds, Pharoh Hounds, Airedales, Shelties, Greyhounds
  • I'm going to be living in an apartment
  • I would prefer an all weather dog because I travel between TX and NY
  • I'm a artist, but I am fairly active. However I need I dog that has maybe a medium activity level
  • I really don't a lot of grooming. Brushing twice a week is really the max for me
  • I'm really quiet and easy going. I like to workout/go for a walk, then relax and read.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,900 Posts
Corgis sound like a match, an airedale as well if you are willing to work with the adolescent.... (not sure "all weather dog" describes Pharoh hounds or greyhounds but they could wear a sweater)... I think there are a fair number of airedale rescues (there is one that advertises in our local paper) and you could get a young dog out of the the puppy stage if that is easier for your lifestyle....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,257 Posts
I think a greyhound sounds like a nice fit. For NY weather, get a coat and boots. My godfather had greyhounds for years. They were all rescues off the track at a few years old (great time to get a dog) and all nice with people. They loved to zoom around the backyard so you would want to have someplace to them to run once a week or so, but they were otherwise relaxed in the house and nice on a leash.
Grooming was very very minimal, just wipe off any muddy feet and bathe on a few times per year.

A plus on greyhounds is that they are fairly easy to find via rescue as young adults.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
Samoyeds handle heat surprisingly well. I know someone who lives in Texas who has a Sam and also Labs. The Samoyed suffers less in the heat than her black lab. But then her dog was intact and did not have that huge spay/neuter coat that Sams can get.

Corgis are also great dogs, why do you think they would be too much? They can be a bit of a challenge but I think they can be fine for a first time owner if they are motivated and willing to attend training classes etc. Samoyeds fall in the same category in my opinion, can be a handful but fine for first time owners if they put in the time and effort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'm really nervous because I've never had a pet before. My sister had gerbils and a hamster that I would occasionally play with, but since I wanted a dog and would not budge on the matter, my parents never allowed me pets. I'm really nervous about it.

I've also heard a lot of conflicting information between Pems and Cardigans. I would really like a mellow but independent dog who can handle being home when I have gallery stuff, but one who still has the energy to do stuff with me when I want (longer jogs and walks, sit in my studio with me, occasional beach/hike).

What makes me nervous is that the breeds I like are ones who are good for first timers IF they put in the extra training effort. But since training will be a HUGE learning curve for me having never done it before, I don't want to overwhelm myself and possibly confuse my pooch. When people tell me a breed like a pitbull, akita, or malamute is more of a "challenge" I get a better picture of what to infer from that than a corgi.

I'm also open to different breeds, so if you have suggestions, that's great to. ( I don't like goldens or labs though)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,674 Posts
My thoughts/concerns...

I'd go with an adult dog. Grad school can be very time consuming (I know from experience; I'm an ABD), and puppies require constant supervision and training. You can't jog with a puppy. You will also get a better idea of the dog's temperament if you start with an adult dog. You have better odds of ending up with a dog with an "off switch."

How do you plan on traveling back and forth between NY and TX? If it's flying, check airline requirements for when dogs can travel. Only very small dogs can fly in the cabin, and you don't want a dog in cargo in extreme weather (or maybe at all...) - TX summers, NY winters for example. Will your parents welcome the dog when you're visiting?

I'd highly recommend waiting until at least your second semester in grad school before acquiring a dog so you really have an idea of what your life will be like, and how much time you will really have to devote to a dog.

I have a dachshund mix. I think he's super :p He's medium sized. I got him from the SPCA.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, I don't actually want a puppy. It's my first dog so I'm not ready for that type of commitment. I forgot to mention that! I wanted a young/adult dog.

In terms of traveling, I suppose I would be flying, but I could also be driving too. it's not very often. Probably for Christmas/major holidays. My parents would be happy for me to bring my pup. They're only objection to me not having a dog was not having to pick up the slack when I was young. As an adult, their opinion is more like "As long as I have nothing to do with it". They like dogs, they just don't want to do more than pet/hang out with one...kinda like their grandchildren. I have family in Texas, so I might just be driving though

I also am not planning on getting a dog right when i get there, because I'd love to explore wherever I wind up living without responsibility. My plan is to move first, and then check out the shelters, rescues, and breeders after I've been there a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
Greyhounds are great first dogs. Vet I work for has owned 12 of them. He had his first when while still in med school. If you want a dog that I quite, clean, and likes to hang out with you a greyhound fits. They are not a dog that can be trusted off leash ever and do not learn tricks very easily. But they are gentle and sweet. The ones that are placed in homes from the rescues are mostly been there done that dogs. Since they are shipped and handled so often at the track they are very tolerant of most things. Here is a link to a greyhound forum.... http://forum.greytalk.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
Out of the breeds you mentioned, I think a greyhound would be the best choice by far. Low to medium energy as long as they have regular running time, capable of the basics and some fun trick training, but they don't NEED it the way a Corgi would. Used to crate travel from the track. Loves their family and friendly enough to strangers. I have never in all of my years of working with animals, met a greyhound that I wouldn't want to take home with me. That is, as long as you realize that there is an adjustment period from track living to pet living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,946 Posts
What makes me nervous is that the breeds I like are ones who are good for first timers IF they put in the extra training effort. But since training will be a HUGE learning curve for me having never done it before, I don't want to overwhelm myself and possibly confuse my pooch. When people tell me a breed like a pitbull, akita, or malamute is more of a "challenge" I get a better picture of what to infer from that than a corgi.
In my experience, dedication is all it really takes. I wouldn't be too scared of owning a corgi as a first dog if your lifestyle is suitable for that breed. If you're dedicated to meeting the dog's needs and to training it well, then nothing will stop you.

My first dog is a high drive border collie mix, definitely not what most people would recommend for a first-time owner. I certainly didn't know what I was doing when I got her. Right off the bat, we enrolled in a basic obedience class, I made sure she got plenty of exercise, and we worked on basic training and impulse control several times a day. It wasn't long before I could see that the training was having a positive effect on her behavior. Five years later, she's the perfect dog for me. We learned everything together, which has made our bond unshakable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,194 Posts
I wouldn't worry too much about corgi's being too much dog for you. The ones I have met were not particularly hard to care for or crazy or anything. If you're willing to put in the work and attend training classes, you'll be fine. The instructors will show you what to do and how to get started. I would suggest meeting some corgis to see if the personality fits you - while I don't think they're too much dog, you might find that the personality is not exactly what you're looking for (or you might find out they're perfect). The pems and the cardis have quite different personalities, so you'll need to see which one fits you better.

I do agree with the others that a greyhound sounds like a fantastic choice for you and it's easy to find adults in rescue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,018 Posts
I think people over-exaggerate some to be honest. I've known a lot of corgis and none were particularly difficult. They are funny dogs and a little harder in temperament than other breeds, moderately driven. I like them if it weren't for the short legs.

I've had a lot of shelties so if you have questions about them, ask away! They're good dogs with an adaptable energy level. THey do bark a lot and shed though. Very sweet dogs though can be timid depending on the line. The sports bred ones can be real firecrackers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I really do love greys. My aunt has a retired grey named ghost and he's great. A gentleman. Once you come in her home, he escorts you around the house and sits beside you while you visit with her. She's told me their skin tears really easily though and they can be accident prone. Does anyone know about their injury tendencies?

Also does anyone know about American Eskimos? I went to the shelter today and I saw 4 year old sweetheart name Garnette. She walked straight up to me and walked beside me while I looked around. Very good with the other dogs and cats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,900 Posts
I really do love greys. My aunt has a retired grey named ghost and he's great. A gentleman. Once you come in her home, he escorts you around the house and sits beside you while you visit with her. She's told me their skin tears really easily though and they can be accident prone. Does anyone know about their injury tendencies?

Also does anyone know about American Eskimos? I went to the shelter today and I saw 4 year old sweetheart name Garnette. She walked straight up to me and walked beside me while I looked around. Very good with the other dogs and cats.
I think Garnette could be a great fit for you! Eskies have good energy level ( I think its Gingerkid who has Snowball) and at 4 years old she should be settled and calm, maybe need a freshening on obedience, and I havent heard that the coat is too too much work.... not anymore than a sheltie I would think ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Honestly Berner, I would have loved to just taken her home, but I can't afford or take in a dog right now. I wish I could because Garnette was just a peach. I think I might volunteer at the shelter on my off days because she's just precious and there was also a great German/Lab mix named Kixx who was a dear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,366 Posts
Snap up that GSD/Lab mix quickly! They're the perfect dog .... just look at Shep, my avatar :)

I suggest a rescued 2 - 5 yo Lab or Lab mix. Frequently the rescue organization can help you find one that fits your lifestyle. You can look locally, or wait until you move to Texas. If TAMU, DFW, or UT, you'll have a great selection to choose from, as well as good resources around campus to help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I would, but I can't get the dog now. I was just at the shelter because a retired teacher I had in elementary school wanted to help me.

I am going to UT and I'll definitely look up my choices when I get there. But just checking out online ads for shelters in the Austin area got me all excited.

This weekend I dogsat my old teachers Eskie/Pom mix Mica and she was SOOO FLUFFY. She didn't shed on me too bad either. She was very quiet and cuddle right up next to me while I did my sketches and worked on papers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,986 Posts
If you get an adult dog, you can speak with the foster/rescue for a good match. We are first time dog owners and made this clear when we adopted Jewel. We had similiar needs to yours (wanted medium energy, medium sized, low grooming, etc). They were able to suggest a good match for us and she is a perfect fit. I personally would never want a puppy because I love the idea of knowing what I am getting, not having to toilet train, and also saving an adult dog. I think as long as you communicate with the rescue organization, you shouldn't have any issues. We were scared and it worked out very well for us and was kind of a breeze. Good luck!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top