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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am a lover of this breed. They are truly amazing dogs. It depresses me every time I look in the paper and see pitbull puppies $150. in my area there are roughly 5-15 adds in the paper every week for more puppies.

Please take time to read these facts.


Fact is "Pit Bulls" are currently the number one bred dog in the United States.

It is estimated that there is a current average of 3 million "Pit Bulls" living in the United States

Only 1 in every 600 Pit bulls will ever find a home, that means for every 1 pit bull adopted 599 are killed.

There are roughly 6-8 million dogs and cats in shelters around the united states. only 30% of dogs and 2-5% of cats are every reclaimed by their owners.

It is estimated 3-4 million dogs and cats are euthanized every year.

It is believed that at LEAST 1 million of those dogs are pit bulls.

In the large U.S city shelters. they find themselves with 40-60% pit bull population.

The national average is 33% pit bulls.

75% of shelters in the U.S policy is to euthanize any pit bull taken in by the shelter.

The euthanasia rate for pit bulls entering a shelter is estimated to be 93% meaning
only 7% of pit bulls taken in by a shelter will ever get homes. the other 93% are killed.

The next time you consider adopting a dog research this breed. they are truly an amazing breed. They are not for everyone but excel at agility , weight pulling, dock jumping and are a great active breed and family dog. maybe someday these numbers can change and this breed can stop being a victim of bad breeding and greed.

"The essential characteristics of the American Pit Bull Terrier are strength, confidence, and zest for life. This breed is eager to please and brimming over with enthusiasm. The American Pit Bull Terrier moves with a jaunty, confident attitude, conveying the impression that he expects any minute to see something new and exciting." - UKC breed standard
 

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I appreciate your love and support of the breed.

However, I think that people should really look at what they want in a dog before selecting a pit bull. They can be high energy. They can be dog aggressive. They can have high prey drive. It can be hard to get insurance when you own one. It can be very hard to rent if you have one. And finally but mostly, many people will openly hate on you when you chose one for a companion. You need to be able to handle the mistreatment of the ignorant.

I love the breed, but I wish there were fewer of them. They aren't for everyone, and if they were more rare and only in the hands of the people who really cared about them, they would stop making headlines.
 

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The APBT is not a breed for just the average joe schmo. The breed is already maligned by bad breeders/owners/people they don't need more of them owning them. So not everybody should consider adopting them.

I love this breed, and have a lot of respect for it, but probably could never own one. I might foster one, if I had the space and time. I will however continue to advocate/educate for them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I don't want to encourage EVERYONE to go adopt a pit bull they are not a dog for everyone but a lot of people looking for an active dog never even think of a pit bull as a possibility. No one should ever adopt any dog without doing proper research. I will adjust my post so this isn't implied ty.
 

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I whole-heartedly agree that the best thing that could happen to the breed is for people to STOP BREEDING THEM!!! The people who are serious about health testing, trialing, and are dedicated to the future of the breed can make all of the pit bulls that the world needs. Back yard breeders need to get out of the pit bull production business. The market was flooded years ago.

The dogs are paying for it.
 

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Then those BYBs/dog fighters will move on to other breeds, and there are some that are way worse than any pittie could ever be.

But I do agree I wish we could stop them from breeding, but we can't we can only educate the prospective owners.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
the back yard breeding is also producing random aggressive dogs which was never suppose to be in this breed at all. which in turn causes a lot of shelters to euthanize them on site. so not only is the market flooded , the bad breeding is effecting the breeds reputation. its a sad situation.
 

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And that's a lot of the issue, that people with no idea get them for the wrong reasons and bam, you have a mess before it's over with. Or those that get them because they WANT a "mean" dog and they let it, or even coerce it, to be such. Just like with any breed, there's a lot in the hands of the owner. Yes, different breeds tend to go different ways as far as personality, desires, workability, temperament, etc etc but an understanding, knowledgeable, caring owner can make a world of a difference. But when given the fact that generally speaking, they're a more aggressive breed and probably about as common as labs in one form or another, add that with bad or uneducated owners...and thus you have a breed generally known for negative news.

I think there's a solid chance my "husky/lab mix" is actually a "husky/pit mix" as you can see what could be some pit in his face, in person. And that's been the most common guess by other people as well, but the previous owner lived on-post here at Ft Hood and pits are a no-go so reasonable to believe that he'd been called a lab mix for that reason.
 

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Then those BYBs/dog fighters will move on to other breeds, and there are some that are way worse than any pittie could ever be.

But I do agree I wish we could stop them from breeding, but we can't we can only educate the prospective owners.
I don't think trainingjunkie was suggesting BSL of any sort when it comes to breeding. I took it as a general comment that the over breeding needs to stop.

But when given the fact that generally speaking, they're a more aggressive breed and probably about as common as labs in one form or another, add that with bad or uneducated owners...and thus you have a breed generally known for negative news.
Pits are not supposed to be aggressive, not with humans anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
any dominant breed can have aggressive issues. A husky is suppose to be ultra friendly dog but if their owner is weak and lets the dog rule the roost chances are even a Husky can become aggressive. Pits have a strong personality and they need a owner who is strong and is familiar with dogs. a unfamiliar dog owner might think growling over a bone, or a really jealous possessive dog is just the dogs personality but in truth that is how owners get bitten by their dogs. If your not stronger then your dog is you'll end up with problems. a dog is a dog and people try to treat them like humans. Pits like so many other breeds are not suppose to be aggressive at all but when it boils down too it, they are dogs and they have instincts and dogs are naturally pack animals who require stability.
 

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I promise that I didn't mean to suggest BSL. It doesn't work.

But the world needs a lot less pit bulls. Not my couch though! I think my couch always needs one more.



These are mine. Proof I'm not a hater...
 

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any dominant breed can have aggressive issues. A husky is suppose to be ultra friendly dog but if their owner is weak and lets the dog rule the roost chances are even a Husky can become aggressive. Pits have a strong personality and they need a owner who is strong and is familiar with dogs. a unfamiliar dog owner might think growling over a bone, or a really jealous possessive dog is just the dogs personality but in truth that is how owners get bitten by their dogs. If your not stronger then your dog is you'll end up with problems. a dog is a dog and people try to treat them like humans. Pits like so many other breeds are not suppose to be aggressive at all but when it boils down too it, they are dogs and they have instincts and dogs are naturally pack animals who require stability.
No no.. this is not true. There are not "dominant" breeds (what are they dominating?) and any dog needs an owner that understands the breed and dogs in general. I don't know what "being stronger" than your dog refers to, but I successfully run a house of six (including a Pit mix) without any of this hierarchy jazz.
 

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And I don't think I said anything about BSL either, or that trainingjunkie implied it.
 

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any dominant breed can have aggressive issues. A husky is suppose to be ultra friendly dog but if their owner is weak and lets the dog rule the roost chances are even a Husky can become aggressive. Pits have a strong personality and they need a owner who is strong and is familiar with dogs. a unfamiliar dog owner might think growling over a bone, or a really jealous possessive dog is just the dogs personality but in truth that is how owners get bitten by their dogs. If your not stronger then your dog is you'll end up with problems. a dog is a dog and people try to treat them like humans. Pits like so many other breeds are not suppose to be aggressive at all but when it boils down too it, they are dogs and they have instincts and dogs are naturally pack animals who require stability.
There is NO such thing as a dominant breed. Some breeds are more independent in nature because their job requires independent thinking, some are more human oriented as their jobs demanded they follow commands closely and needed to be more easily trained. Knowing the jobs involved in developing a breed can help a person train a dog, but the whole 'dominance' thing is pure BUNK.
 

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While I appreciate your advocacy for the breed, do yourself a favor. Before you publically make posts, statements or even say anything publically, make SURE you have your facts straight.

Some of Your data is way way off.


Please take time to read these facts.


Fact is "Pit Bulls" are currently the number one bred dog in the United States.

It is estimated that there is a current average of 3 million "Pit Bulls" living in the United States

Only 1 in every 600 Pit bulls will ever find a home, that means for every 1 pit bull adopted 599 are killed.
While I agree pit bulls are the most common breed in the US. ASPCA does as well. But we don't know for sure. The data is nearly impossible to obtain. But more on this in a minute.

At 3 million dogs, that does not even put the breed in the top three. A more accurate figure would be closer to 8 million dogs. But because the data from some sources is impossible to compile, it could be off a couple of million dogs either way.

Your one in 600 is woefully innaccurate. The math just does not add up.

Using your figure of three million, if only one in 600 finds a home, there would only be 5000 dogs in pet homes. 3,000,000/600= 5000. There are about there are more than twice that amount of pit bulls in the County alone.

There are roughly 6-8 million dogs and cats in shelters around the united states. only 30% of dogs and 2-5% of cats are every reclaimed by their owners.

It is estimated 3-4 million dogs and cats are euthanized every year.

It is believed that at LEAST 1 million of those dogs are pit bulls.

In the large U.S city shelters. they find themselves with 40-60% pit bull population.

The national average is 33% pit bulls.

75% of shelters in the U.S policy is to euthanize any pit bull taken in by the shelter.

The euthanasia rate for pit bulls entering a shelter is estimated to be 93% meaning
only 7% of pit bulls taken in by a shelter will ever get homes. the other 93% are killed.
The figures above are guesses not estimates. There is no sort of uniform reporting for shelters from state to state. That is something that NAIA and state associations like the FAKC are working to change.

IF you are going to be an advocate, be dang sure your facts are straight. You will get picked apart otherwise.

The
 

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I appreciate your love and support of the breed.

However, I think that people should really look at what they want in a dog before selecting a pit bull. They can be high energy. They can be dog aggressive. They can have high prey drive. It can be hard to get insurance when you own one. It can be very hard to rent if you have one. And finally but mostly, many people will openly hate on you when you chose one for a companion. You need to be able to handle the mistreatment of the ignorant.

I love the breed, but I wish there were fewer of them. They aren't for everyone, and if they were more rare and only in the hands of the people who really cared about them, they would stop making headlines.
Well said. I agree on all counts.

As a dog sport enthusiast, I just wanted to add that while pit bulls are excellent at weight pulling (Nubs from this board being an excellent example), I believe other breeds are better suited to agility, dock diving, and other dog sports. Particularly when looking into competition, it pays to have a dog that is friendly and comfortable around other dogs. I understand that many pit bulls are great with other dogs, but this goes against what they were bred for, and is therefore not the majority.
 

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Well said. I agree on all counts.

As a dog sport enthusiast, I just wanted to add that while pit bulls are excellent at weight pulling (Nubs from this board being an excellent example), I believe other breeds are better suited to agility, dock diving, and other dog sports. Particularly when looking into competition, it pays to have a dog that is friendly and comfortable around other dogs. I understand that many pit bulls are great with other dogs, but this goes against what they were bred for, and is therefore not the majority.
I don't think you actually mean "better suited (to these activities)" - I think what you mean is that other breeds are 'more responsive to the usual teaching methods for these activities'. And that is certainly a fact. Which is why you rarely see these kinds of dogs at the higher levels of these activities.

However, this doesn't mean that they can't do them. It does mean that you will have to train them using different methods at times, be ready to 'think outside the box' during training, and be prepared for a possibly longer training period.

Here's a video of a "pit bull" showing in Rally-O:





And here's one of a "pit bull" showing in Open Obedience:


 
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