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Me and my fiancé decided we needs a dog in our lives so I really thought rescuing a dog was the best option. We found a lab/boxer mix 7 week old puppy we fell in love with and took him home. Now he is 4 months old and we took him on his first trip to the dog park. We were most unkindly greeted by a man telling us we would t be allowed into the park. I immeadeatly showed him my licence for the park and told him im registered. He then told me they didn't allow pitbulls into the park. To me and my finace we never thought twice about what they told us he was at the shelter now we have a 4 month old pitbull mix who is shunned by the doggy community. This is my first dog I'm raisng on my own and we are really worried he will grow up and be mean. He's not aggressive now at all and I've been doing slot of research on how to keepthat from happening. I'm a very assertive person and our puppy (Hank) listens perfectly. This is just kind of a big let down that we have a dog that nobody wants around. Any input or comments will help our little pup is being shunned
 

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Your dog will NOT grow up to be mean based on his breed. He will grow to be who you shape him to be. Socialize him well and teach him his manners and give him lots of love and attention and you will have a wonderful dog. Breed has NOTHING do to with it. I have worked at a shelter for 2 years and have yet to meet a mean pit bull, rottweiler, doberman or other bully breed. I have met ONE aggressive shepherd, but after two months worth of socialization at the shelter, he became a sweetheart to everyone he met. The most common 'mean' dogs are Chihuahuas around these parts, and even then we've only seen 4 or 5 of them like that. Dogs are dogs, regardless of breed. Don't let anybody tell you otherwise.

Also, if you have your paperwork from the shelter stating he is lab/boxer, you should be allowed in, regardless of what some guy at the dog park says.
 

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It's actually not unusual for shelters to fudge with "boxer mix". Our local shelter used to not adopt out Pit Bulls and mixes, and a number got identified as boxer mixes if they were nice dogs that the staff wanted to get out. And it's still probably easier to get a "Boxer mix" adopted due to all the bad press that Pits get. That said, there's noting intrinsically wrong with Pit Bulls. They tend to be wonderful dogs with humans, sometimes less wonderful with other dogs, but that's not every dog. Love your puppy. Raise him to be a good dog and you'll have a good dog. As to the guy at the dog park, was he someone in authority or just a nasty old fart who wanted to tell others what to do. If he's the latter, I'd just ignore him and let him stew in his own juices.
 

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Post a picture.

We were lucky with Bryna. I SAW her parents, so I knew what she was, but when we took her to get her licensed, the lady almost registered as a Pit mix without even asking us. Granted, she did look Pit-ish as a pup, but she's definitely a boxer/lab mix.
 

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Me and my fiancé decided we needs a dog in our lives so I really thought rescuing a dog was the best option. We found a lab/boxer mix 7 week old puppy we fell in love with and took him home. Now he is 4 months old and we took him on his first trip to the dog park. We were most unkindly greeted by a man telling us we would t be allowed into the park. I immeadeatly showed him my licence for the park and told him im registered. He then told me they didn't allow pitbulls into the park..
Binkalette said:
Also, if you have your paperwork from the shelter stating he is lab/boxer, you should be allowed in, regardless of what some guy at the dog park says.
If this is a monitored dog park, Binkalette is unfortunately incorrect. If your park has BSL-type regulations, the dog park attendant DOES make those decisions. He/she is simply enforcing the regulations for the park.

Sometimes you can request an evaluation from your county/municipal dog control officer as to whether your dog should be categorized under the BSLs. If the officer issues an opinion that it does, however, you are going to be stuck with it - and AFAIK, you will also be listed as having that type of dog on your premises and be subject to whatever other regulations your locality may impose.

I don't like these kinds of regulations - I much prefer regulations based on the behavior of the specific dog and not on the breed or type of dog. But that does mean more work for the officials, and with all the government cutbacks, I'm not encouraged.

To me and my finace we never thought twice about what they told us he was at the shelter now we have a 4 month old pitbull mix who is shunned by the doggy community. This is my first dog I'm raisng on my own and we are really worried he will grow up and be mean. He's not aggressive now at all and I've been doing slot of research on how to keepthat from happening. I'm a very assertive person and our puppy (Hank) listens perfectly. This is just kind of a big let down that we have a dog that nobody wants around. Any input or comments will help our little pup is being shunned

Please do NOT be discouraged. Even if your dog is actually a bully-type, he can be a good pet with the proper training.

I would suggest that you and your dog be enrolled in a pet obedience class and that you work to take the CGC test. At our school, we have trained registered APBTs, AmStaffs, American Bulldogs, and other "bully breeds" to pass the CGC test. Also mixed breed bully-types. So it can be done.

Even after training, it is important that you continue to work with your dog to maintain the training and to keep him occupied.

Finally, if you have access to it - and when he is old enough - I would suggest that you have your dog temperament-tested by a recognized organization such as the ATTS.

Even if he is a bully-type, some local BSLs do allow for an exception if the dog has those certifications. But even if not, the training will be a positive experience for your dog - and for you.
 

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DON'T let the term "Pit Bull" intimidate you, nor the reactions of other ignorant people bother you. Take him to some puppy classes, and be consistent with his training. Do your research on the breed. Be a responsible, caring owner. Bring him around as many people as you can and socialize him. But above all, love your dog unconditionally. If you do all these things, he'll turn out just fine and you won't have a thing to worry about :)
 

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Pit bulls are great, loving dogs that are great with people, kids, and generally other animals too. Definitely take a class or two (or 10!) with him and socialize him with lots of people of all ages and sizes along with all dogs that you can. You'll end up with a wonderful dog and you'll wonder how you ever did without.
 

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Pit Bulls can sometimes (I've been told) exhibit dog aggression, but then so can absolutely any dog you get. Pit Bulls are very human-friendly. They do not, without abuse and neglect, become human-aggressive. Unfortunately, there is a lot of bias against Pit Bulls, because people would rather let the media do their thinking for them. In England and Ireland, there are wholesale bans on Pit Bulls, despite quite a lot of research showing that breed-specific bans don't work. Don't worry about your buddy. He will doubtlessly love you forever. At around 18 months, dogs come into their maturity. Since he's a rescue and already fixed, this shouldn't make a lot of difference, but if he does growl at another dog, just calmly walk away, and start LAT (look at that) training. You can look it up, but it's basically where you give treats to a dog just for looking at something that causes them stress. You have to start at a distance and progress, but I won't go into that here. You likely will never need it. I had a Border Collie become dog aggressive at 18 months or so (I had him fixed after a year old), and LAT training had him walking happily past dogs in a few weeks. Seriously, you will likely never have an issue.

Edit - the only thing I'll say is that, as your dog reaches maturity, realize that Pit Bulls are very robust dogs that require proper exercise. My Aussies were driving me nuts, until I did research and found that the exercise I was giving them wasn't enough. More fetch, and some puzzle toys, along with a few minutes' training here and there, and the problem was solved.
 

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Considering that I just met a woman and her daughter whose lives were saved from a fire by their pit bull.... a very lovable and adorable pit bull... then tell all those naysayers to stuff it. Besides, your pup might have a variety of breeds and may or may not have any pit bull in him.
I have met nasty dogs of a variety of breeds- GSDs, St Bernards!, Boxers, and yes, pits. All of them were untrained, borderline neglected (left in yard all day, no walks, no socializing etc. Food and water only).
And I have met sweet and friendly pits etc. Whose owners love them and socialize them and train them and care for them.

The only caution I would have is to watch for possible dog aggression as even well trained and well socialized pit bulls can have DA. Which is not the same as human aggression and really isn't that big of deal if you properly manage your dog. Some of our resident pit bull experts can tell you more as my knowledge of the breed is mostly second hard (as I don't own one)
Personally, I'm not a fan of dog parks anyway as too many people bring dogs that aren't suited to the park and it leads to trouble.

You may want to look into your local laws, your insurance etc for any breed restrictions as a just in case. Even pure bred dogs of other breeds can be mistaken for pit bulls by the average joe and that can lead to hassles that you want to be prepared for.
 
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