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I wrote this to a local rescue group but I'm gonna post here for ideas as well. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Oh, and for the record we all live in NJ near NY so closer resources would be best.



Hello, I'm hoping you might be able to help or at least point me in the right direction. A few months ago my in-laws adopted a pit-bull/lab mix. I warned them that this was not the dog for them since they have very little dog experience and wanted a calm easy dog. I suggested a retired greyhound but of course they didn't listen and adopted the dog anyway. I met the dog right after and he seemed very friendly, if untrained, and I had some hope it might work out. Well, for the first time in a few months we went over to their house. It is definitely not working out.

They have 3 children in the home ages 13, 11, and 9. The dog spent it's entire time stealing the kids' toys and then biting aggressively when anyone tried to take a toy away. If you touch the dog's collar it tries to bite. If you go near the dog it hides and shows aggression. It is definitely not an appropriate dog to have in a home with children and if it doesn't get out of there and into a dog savvy home where it can be taught some manners I fear it will be beyond trainable soon. That's the part that really has me upset. I worked with the dog a bit while I was there and I could see that it really is a sweet dog. It just needs an owner who has experience with the breeds' energy and this dogs dominant behavior. There is a good dog hiding inside behind all the resource guarding, it just needs some help to come out. I would love to be able to take the dog and work with it but I have young children of my own and for right now I think this is a dog that needs to be in an adult only household.

My in-laws and I have very different ideas on dogs. I'm a vet tech, love animals, and strongly believe that when you adopted a dog you are committing to the work that that pet will take. They, well, they just don't. They told me last night that it would be to much work to take the dog to a trainer and that they don't want to spend the money (argh!). They did mention that they thought they might have to give it up. I agree with that but I don't want to see this poor dog go to a kill shelter where it will have no chance. I want to be able to present them with some alternatives, such as a no-kill shelter or pit bull specific group that they might be able to surrender the dog too.

So the big question is, do you have any resources I can give them that might help? Names of groups they can call? Anything that can improves this dog's chances before they all run out?

I love pits and I do not want to see this dog become an example of a bad pit through no fault of it's own. It's definitely a case of bad owners but I don't know what to tell them to help get this dog out of there and into a better situation. Any help you can give at all would be highly appreciated!
 

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Does not sound like an appropriate dog for anyone to own, period. I do not like pitbull mixes that behave in that manner. Their behavior tends to be very unpredictable. Cross breeding them into other breeds that don't have the "human sound" bully temperament is only asking for trouble. They look alike to pitbulls in general and only further the damnation of the pitbull reputation. Especially if the dog was not socialized properly. Personally, I would put the dog down.

PB
 

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I was in a similar situation once when I lived in NC. My dogs (pits) unexpectedly got pregnant and had puppies. It was hard for me to get rid of the pups b/c I refused to give them to someone I didnt know and trust. I was afraid of having to take them to a pound or something like that. Luckily it never came to that. But, I was able to find a pit bull rescue society. I found it on google (like everything else). Have you tried googling "Pit Bull Rescue in NJ or NY" I'm sure you'll find something.
 

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While I don't like the situation for the family or the dog....I could not recommend putting down a dog with out being there to see it first hand......but I think STD is right on...I would check around your area for a bully rescue ....they may have some way of assisting the family:)
 

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Does not sound like an appropriate dog for anyone to own, period. I do not like pitbull mixes that behave in that manner. Their behavior tends to be very unpredictable. Cross breeding them into other breeds that don't have the "human sound" bully temperament is only asking for trouble. They look alike to pitbulls in general and only further the damnation of the pitbull reputation. Especially if the dog was not socialized properly. Personally, I would put the dog down.
I disagree with this completely...the dog doesn't sound unpredictable at all. He is resource guarding which isn't a big problem, the only problem is that he is in the wrong home to work on the problem. No dog breed is "human sound." Just because pitties like people doesn't mean they are human sound. Socialization plays a HUGE role. If you don't socialize a pitty, it is probably not going to be a social butterfly. Same with a lab, or any other breed for that matter.

And the type of guarding he has doesn't have to due with socialization or genetics. It has to due with lack of training, and lack of direct leadership.

The dog doesn't need to be put down, he just needs 5 minutes of training a day to realize things aren't going to be taken away from him.
 

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I disagree with this completely...the dog doesn't sound unpredictable at all. He is resource guarding which isn't a big problem, the only problem is that he is in the wrong home to work on the problem. No dog breed is "human sound." Just because pitties like people doesn't mean they are human sound. Socialization plays a HUGE role. If you don't socialize a pitty, it is probably not going to be a social butterfly. Same with a lab, or any other breed for that matter.
This type of behavior is plain unacceptable, period. Bully breeds have a natural affection toward humans. Fighting dogs are supposed to be naturally human affectionate/friendly. The dog is already a mixed pit bull breed, and frankly, I do not take kindly to them. They bully temperament is ruined when mixed with whatever the dog was crossed with.

My pit bulls do not come in contact with children often. I can count on three fingers how many times a child has touched them. I tell you what, they reacted as friendly as they ever could have. Just as many dogs who snap at children or people in general over something, there are just as many who don't with more "human sound temperaments."

By logic, bully breeds are the most human sound breeds because they were utilized as fighting dogs. Therefore, animal aggression rather than human aggression. I wouldn't blink twice if some strange child decided to hop over our gate and pull the tail of my dogs. It's a trait of breed even if you don't "socialize" it into them.

PB
 

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Having actually met the dog and spent some time working with him I can say that I do not believe that he needs to be put to sleep.

He is friendly and affectionate when you walk in and say hello. He sits nicely to be pet and is pretty outgoing. The problems only start when he has something that he views as valuable and you try to take it away. The thing is is that he is viewing everything as valuable and showing major resource guarding.

On the other hand, while he went for my hand the first time I went to grab his collar, after about 5 minutes of treating while reaching for his collar he let me grab it with no problem. The dog is smart, to smart to be with a family that isn't dog savvy.

That said, I have looked up local pit rescues and have so far turned up nothing except for the local shelters, which is exactly where I don't want him to go. The shelters around here aren't bad but he would do much better in a group that can offer him some training. If I can't find one it seems the only alternative is a shelter.

I really wish that I could work with him, but like I said I think he's going to need an adult only home while working through the resource issues and I have children. It's beating me up because it was right on the tip of my tongue the whole time to ask to take him home.

The search is still on for a place for him to go. Hopefully I'll see some responses to the e-mail I sent around soon.
 
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