Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It seems many dogs available for "adoption" on petfinder are really "for sale". forgive me if I'm wrong but a $400.00 "adoption" fee is outrageous for a puppy. If your trying to sell a dog just sell it don't hide behind a place like petfinder and make it seem as though the animal is adoptable when your just trying to make a few bucks...your just as bad as BYB's. JMHO !:mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,766 Posts
All petfinder does is link you to adoption agencies. Some rescues are better than others, and it's up to you to weed out the bad eggs.

But....$400 is not over-the-top for an adoption in some places. If the dog is spayed/neutered and fully vetted, it could be a really good bargain. In some areas, just a spay costs $400 or more. Almost all rescues put more than $400 into their animals, and some are more willing to take a loss than others are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,204 Posts
Think about it this way, That $400 includes Shots, Spay/neutering, health checkups, deworming, and the rest of that money goes for helping the next dog in need get the same.

Rescue groups do not make money off of their animals. They spend WAY more on them then that $400 normally.

I only paid $100 for my pup though... But the Dobermans I was looking at were $400 to $500 but they were all foster cared for, so I didn't mind the extra $$$ for something like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Petfinder is not just a site where you set up a username and password and TADA! you're up and running. You do have to be a legitimate rescue, shelter or veterinarian. All three of these must fax a letter of reference signed by their primary veterinarian (on his letterhead) confirming that he provides medical care for the pets in your rescue and adoption program. If you are a 501(c) you have to send in your IRS declaration letter and state certificate. If you are not, you have to send them your adoption contract and application. A human being contacts you once this is done and asks more questions. It's not a simple process.

Personally, I don't feel $400 is an exorbant adoption fee. Having been in rescue for more than 10 years, I can honestly say I have never fostered a dog that had expenses under this amount. Expenses including diagnostic testing, medication, surgical procedures, vaccinations, special diets, etc... The adoption fee is always considerably less than what a rescue spends.

Frankly, I have no problem spending $400 to adopt a pet that has been so exceptionally vetted and cared for and who would otherwise have been euthanized; and feel that if a potential adopter balks over the adoption fee, they aren't a good candidate for adopting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,284 Posts
$400 is still cheaper than what you'd pay anywhere else (a reputable place or not) for a puppy. And, as pointed out, that pup comes with a lot of perks attached.

Sure, there are bad rescues. Maybe this particular rescue is cashing in on their dogs, who are we to say? I'd compare that fee to the fees of other similar groups in your area. Take into account rescues that have a shelter vs. rescues that use foster care. There may be a difference in fee because of that.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
335 Posts
I'm just not certain how it can be all right for a rescue to charge $400 or more for a dog to be "adopted" (I'm sorry, I consider that to be a sale price) and yet hobby breeders are maligned for selling their dogs for what is also a loss to them. I see nothing wrong in a rescue using the word "sell;" in fact, I wish that more of them would, since the "adopt" as "good" frame of mind is an AR thing. It's one of those things that I wish would change in the dog/pet world.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I think it depends on the dog.
Our rat terrier we adopted for $300 but she was a puppy. Our lab that we just recently adopted was $400 and we think he's around 1.5 years old.

However, our lab Ryder came from Ohio as a stray and they transported him from a kill shelter to Ontario. Before his transport they vetted him and discovered he was heartworm positive. He then had to stay in a kennel for 2 months before travelling here to Ontario.

The rescue had to pay for his boarding, his heartworm test and care, vaccinations, neutering, etc. I know the final cost to get him to us was over $1200. I feel that I got a bargain as he is such a wonderful dog!!!!!!!!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,773 Posts
I don't think that 400$ is horrible depending on what care the dog has received. I also think IMO that its a moral issue w/me....I would rather give my money to someone who is helping the massive amounts of unwanted pets vs someone who is just adding to the problem because they think its fun to breed their pet or they want to make money.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
335 Posts
I would rather give my money to someone who is helping the massive amounts of unwanted pets vs someone who is just adding to the problem because they think its fun to breed their pet or they want to make money.
I agree that BYBs and "puppy mills" shouldn't be supported, but how do responsible hobby/show breeders fit into that equation?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
I don't pretend to know what most dogs cost but I have seen posts from people on this forum who say they purchased their dogs from reputable breeders for $400 or less.

I personally wouldn't pay that much for an adoption fee even if it included shots and s/n since those services are reasonably priced in my area. I think rescues and shelters are a good thing, but I do find it odd that prices and practices many find irresponsible in breeders are often considered perfectly acceptable for rescues and shelters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Petfinder is not just a site where you set up a username and password and TADA! you're up and running. You do have to be a legitimate rescue, shelter or veterinarian. All three of these must fax a letter of reference signed by their primary veterinarian (on his letterhead) confirming that he provides medical care for the pets in your rescue and adoption program. If you are a 501(c) you have to send in your IRS declaration letter and state certificate. If you are not, you have to send them your adoption contract and application. A human being contacts you once this is done and asks more questions. It's not a simple process.

Individuals can list on Petfinder. That's where we found Molly. There's a place for rescue groups and individuals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Individuals can list on Petfinder. That's where we found Molly. There's a place for rescue groups and individuals.
I was referring to the main search for pets in which you do have to be a legitimate rescue, not the classified ads section in which anyone can post.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
A family may not have $400.00 for an adoption fee, that doesn't mean they're not a good candidate. What, only people with money can adopt, thats what your saying. If fosters are spending more than what is asked for an adoption fee, money does not seem to be an issue with them so why not give them to a deserving, caring family. I didn't mean to make it sound like such a blanket statement, I'm sure there are a few who have good intentions.

"I got a bargain, but he was a baby, $400.00 is still cheaper than, I don't mind paying, they're dobermans"...these are all key words and phrases you use for making a purchase...but you say your adopting, well what is it? Are you adopting or buying? But, But, But. These sites need to be monitored more closely. With today's economy it doesn't surprise me some will use petfinder as a venue for making money.


Can someone explain this please? Who is making money here?

Learn more about joining Petfinder to increase your adoption rate, and tap into our free network of expert resources and partnerships!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
A family may not have $400.00 for an adoption fee, that doesn't mean they're not a good candidate. What, only people with money can adopt, thats what your saying.
If a family cannot afford the adoption fee, they cannot afford the dog. So yes, only people with money can adopt. Money for food, flea/tick prevention, regular vet visits, unexpected vet visits, etc. These things could easily add up to more than $400 in no time.

It reminds me of when I worked on real estate closings and one purchaser couldn't close because they didn't have $500 to pay their closing costs. Sorry, but if you can't afford to pay $500 to buy a house, how are you going to pay to maintain the house? Same thing with the dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,766 Posts
I would like to foster, please tell me how to get started.
It's not hard....just contact your rescue/shelter of choice and tell them you want to foster for them. They'll have you fill out an application and probably do a home check (to make sure you don't have live electric wires or venomous snakes lying about :p ). If one rescue/shelter turns you down or they say they don't need foster homes, contact another agency.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
335 Posts
If a family cannot afford the adoption fee, they cannot afford the dog. So yes, only people with money can adopt. Money for food, flea/tick prevention, regular vet visits, unexpected vet visits, etc. These things could easily add up to more than $400 in no time.
I rarely have $400 sitting around that I can spare for the purchase of a purebred animal, let alone a mixed breed from a shelter. The last time I purchased a dog, the breeder let me pay over time, $100/month until the dog was paid off. I received the papers from her with the penultimate payment. I'm not saying that it's the ideal way of doing things, but if breeders are willing to work with people, then why are rescues and shelters unwilling to do so?

As far as other expenses go, it is an unusual event indeed for a person to need to pay $400 at one time for any of the things you mention. A person might be able to purchase pet insurance or wellness plans to assist them with their medical bills and there is Credit Care for some people as well. People can also save money over the lifetime of their pet to assist with emergency costs. To say that a person should not get a pet simply because s/he does not have a large lump sum of money to begin with seems a bit unreasonable, don't you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
but I do find it odd that prices and practices many find irresponsible in breeders are often considered perfectly acceptable for rescues and shelters.
why? what's odd?

breeders are out for 1 thing. bling.

shelters and resues are out to help the dogs, not just the one you're adopting, but many, many others.

i paid 350 for bismarck, and am going to donate (through work) another 500 to help with costs.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,273 Posts
As far as other expenses go, it is an unusual event indeed for a person to need to pay $400 at one time for any of the things you mention.
Spirtsong did mention unexpected vet visits, and those can easily add up to $400 or more. I had two unexpected vet visits in the first year I had Kuma, and each totalled to over $300, and most vet clinics do not offer payment plans. I agree, if you can't afford to pay the adoption fee, you likely can't afford to take care of a dog. Anyone can save up $400 over time to pay for the dog, the long term care is the truly expensive part, and it's the unexpected costs that will kill you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,766 Posts
I do find it odd that prices and practices many find irresponsible in breeders are often considered perfectly acceptable for rescues and shelters.
What practices do you have in mind? Although I've seen some pretty bad city shelters, they're not usually the ones that charge a lot. The rescues and decent shelters I know of don't have any really questionable practices. And prices.....I think $1500 for a mixed-breed dog from Petland is ridiculous. $400 for a fully vetted rescue dog, not so bad.
IAs far as other expenses go, it is an unusual event indeed for a person to need to pay $400 at one time for any of the things you mention.
I dunno....even though vet care costs in my area are very reasonable, spaying and everything related to it could easily cost $400 altogether. Especially if it's a large dog, or an older dog that needed bloodwork before surgery.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top