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I just have to get this off my chest. I'm sure there are others out there that always hear from people, over and over, the same myths about their breed of dog! Most commonly, of course, you pit bull folks... but there are others too, I'm sure! I will start out with my NUMBER ONE pet peeve breed myth, about Chinese Cresteds that even some Crestie BREEDERS believe:
Myth: If you breed two Hairless Cresteds together, the puppies will be stillborn! You must always breed a Powderpuff to a Hairless to get live Hairless puppies.

Truth: This misconception is based from the fact that Chinese Cresteds have very unusual genetics. To put it simply, all Cresteds are heterozygous with the 'hairless' gene being an incomplete dominant. This is why they have hair on some parts of their body and none on others, because the dominant hairless gene only partially overrides the coated gene. To put it in a simpler image, Cresteds are basically 'coated dogs with large hairless patches'.

If you remember high school biology class, this genetic combo would be written out as: Hp (H = dominant hairless gene, and p = recessive powderpuff gene). What is TRUE is that the gene combination for HH (which has a 1 in 4 chance to occur whenever an egg is fertilized) results in no puppy being created at all.

The scientific term for this is a 'prenatal lethal' gene combination. The word 'lethal' confuses some people into thinking this means it kills the puppy, but this is wrong, it is simply a 'dud' combination that prevents a zygote from ever becoming a puppy. In dogs, that means the egg will be reabsorbed by the mother soon after fertilization. The term for a genetic defect that would cause stillborn puppies is 'congenital lethal'.
So, other breed folks! Do you always hear a common myth about your breed that many people seem to think is true?
 

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Not a breed I own (yet anyway), but growing up I always heard the Doberman myth. That their brains continue to grow and eventually they will go crazy and turn on their owner.
 

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Not a breed I own (yet anyway), but growing up I always heard the Doberman myth. That their brains continue to grow and eventually they will go crazy and turn on their owner.
in a way, this was true....it's not that their brains keep growing, it's that the "showlines" called for a sleeker head, not taking into account that the skull was "constructed" larger for a purpose.....just like w/ the Cavaliers....the smaller skull puts excessive pressure on the brain and thus causing pain thus causing, in the Dobe, aggression.....sorry folks, i don't have any thing to back this up other than the fact that i had talked w/ a vet that raised/showed big-headed Dobes about it.....he had done research on it himself.....
 

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I own an APBT....so the list of myths is a long one :D

so I will go w/one about my pug or pugs in general

"if a pug sneezes too hard there eyes could pop out"...now yes pugs can be prone to eye injury do to the eyes being they way they are...but they are not going to go flying out because of a sneeze :rolleyes:
 

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" you can't keep a heeler indoors"
"dachshunds can never be potty trained"

I've heard both of those sooooo many times. And my heeler lives inside, and the last time Max pooed in the house was bc I thought he was outside with us one morning, but he was left inside, and pood right by the door for me.
 

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Actually, I'm apt to believe the pug one. I've seen three pugs lose an eye. One got bumped by another dog in play (in the side, not the eye, and certainly not that hard), one jumped off the couch, and one got an overzealous correction on a choke chain.

All had an eyeball pop out.

Now, these were not what you would call good looking pugs. These were the pugs everyone thinks of when they go "oh, but they're sooo ugly." You know, the barely breathing, tongue doesn't fit in the mouth at all, eyes barely in the sockets they're bugged out so bad, etc, etc.

It wouldn't surprise me in the slightest to add a powerful sneeze to that list, particularly if the nasal passage was blocked up in some way and added back pressure into the ocular cavity.

Seen too many of them...
 

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Myth: Great Dane's only live 5 or 6 years

Fact: Wrong. The average lifespan for a well-bred Great Dane is actually 8-10 years with many dogs making it to 11, 12 or even 13 years of age. We've had 4 now and not one has lived less than 10.5 years.


If that myth keeps people away from the breed however, that would make me happy. Don't want them to become the next flavor of the decade.
 

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Actually, I'm apt to believe the pug one. I've seen three pugs lose an eye. One got bumped by another dog in play (in the side, not the eye, and certainly not that hard), one jumped off the couch, and one got an overzealous correction on a choke chain.

All had an eyeball pop out.

Now, these were not what you would call good looking pugs. These were the pugs everyone thinks of when they go "oh, but they're sooo ugly." You know, the barely breathing, tongue doesn't fit in the mouth at all, eyes barely in the sockets they're bugged out so bad, etc, etc.

It wouldn't surprise me in the slightest to add a powerful sneeze to that list, particularly if the nasal passage was blocked up in some way and added back pressure into the ocular cavity.

Seen too many of them...
the part in bold would lead me to believe that these were not just "ugly pugs" but very very poorly bred pugs...which had genetic defects..not a normal healthy animal

how would a nasal passage get blocked up so bad that no air could escape?...unless it was being held shut?...unless the dog had some defect that was blocking ....but then again not a breed standard..

my pug sneezes all the time...happens when you have a short muzel and are close to the ground...her eyes don't go flying out


I would say that eyes popping out is the exception, not the rule...
 

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I hate ALL of those "average breed lifespan" stats. Barring serious illness, I've never met a dog that didn't exceed the "average" who was cared for with good food, proper veterinary care, exercise and love.

Overall, the majority of the dogs I know who have passed on are well over their lifespan. We've had two clients lose cats this week, one was 20 and one was 23. We lost a 14 year old lab and a 15 year old husky who is infirm but still doing well. I also know a 17 year old St Bernard (raw fed).

I think one of the greatest things I ever saw was a pair of yorkies - one was four, the other was 22 - and you couldn't tell the difference between them, other than the cateracts in the older one's eyes. The owners fed them whatever they ate (Senior owners, who cooked all food from scratch, ate a good diet - not like us young 'uns.. lol).

Life span averages should be re-evaluated in my opinion... although they don't even have a decent system in place to report medication/food/vaccination reactions, so reporting breed deaths and reasons would be next to impossible. :(

Sorry... off my soap box now. lol

the part in bold would lead me to believe that these were not just "ugly pugs" but very very poorly bred pugs...which had genetic defects..not a normal healthy animal
Oh, I completely agree... unfortunately, the poorly bred pugs far outnumber the well bred ones these days. :(

Personally, I love the little guys - we've rescued several of them, and they'll always hold a special place in our hearts. But the fact remains, it does happen. It doesn't make it a myth. It's like saying that all pugs are friendly. Not all of them are! Doesn't mean that "all pugs are friendly" is a myth. Just that it happens.

Sorry... didn't mean to step on any toes. Just sharing my personal experience with the breed during my stint as a vet assistant.
 

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Wow, I didn't know Danes could live that long. I think I will go out and buy one today. ;)
:D

I hate ALL of those "average breed lifespan" stats. Barring serious illness, I've never met a dog that didn't exceed the "average" who was cared for with good food, proper veterinary care, exercise and love.

Overall, the majority of the dogs I know who have passed on are well over their lifespan. We've had two clients lose cats this week, one was 20 and one was 23. We lost a 14 year old lab and a 15 year old husky who is infirm but still doing well. I also know a 17 year old St Bernard (raw fed).

I think one of the greatest things I ever saw was a pair of yorkies - one was four, the other was 22 - and you couldn't tell the difference between them, other than the cateracts in the older one's eyes. The owners fed them whatever they ate (Senior owners, who cooked all food from scratch, ate a good diet - not like us young 'uns.. lol).

Life span averages should be re-evaluated in my opinion... although they don't even have a decent system in place to report medication/food/vaccination reactions, so reporting breed deaths and reasons would be next to impossible. :(

Sorry... off my soap box now. lol
I completely agree with the bolded part. I've seen many people and places trumpeting only 6 year lifespans for the Great Dane and I can just only shake my head.

My breeder who our current Dane came from has a 14 year old in the household and she's still as active as ever and living life well.
 

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Oh, I completely agree... unfortunately, the poorly bred pugs far outnumber the well bred ones these days. :(

Personally, I love the little guys - we've rescued several of them, and they'll always hold a special place in our hearts. But the fact remains, it does happen. It doesn't make it a myth. It's like saying that all pugs are friendly. Not all of them are! Doesn't mean that "all pugs are friendly" is a myth. Just that it happens.

Sorry... didn't mean to step on any toes. Just sharing my personal experience with the breed during my stint as a vet assistant.
no toes stepped on :)......but I don't think this statment makes any sense?
 

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One thing that really bugs me is the idea that little dogs are harder to train than big dogs or less intelligent.
 
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