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I have a 5 month old bichon frise puppy. I just went through researching different companies. I went with Healthy Paws. I chose them because they were reasonable and had unlimited payouts. I chose 90% reimbursement with a $250 deductible. My monthly premium is $31.25.
 

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Thank you for your response. My little boy will be arriving in about 4weeks. Trying to get everything ready. He is a mini schnoodle. His name will be Kenny.
 

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I have PetPlan. Healthy Paws was almost double the monthly premium but age, size and breed make a big difference in cost.

I picked a bit higher deductable and lower percentage coverage because its for the big stuff, similar to car or house insurance.

Like much insurance, most people would end up around financially equal or better off just saving the premiums into an account. Except! Puppies can cost a lot of money very quickly with things like parvo or eating dangerous items. Then adult dogs tend to have fewer risks and then the costs ramp back up with older age joint injuries, cancers, etc.

I like the peace of mind to not worry about cost in an emergency.

PetPlan paid out with no trouble for a UTI, knee surgery (ccl tear, not emergency vet) and emergency vet care for Chester's sudden cancer diagnoses last year. I think premiums paid roughly equaled payouts in the end but it meant no huge cost at any one time and it meant that I did not debate taking him to a 24 hr specialist and ordering xrays and tests at midnight on a Saturday. It took me a while emotionally to submit the claims after his passing and the customer support woman helped me file them and refunded premiums back to his date of death. She said people had even taken a year to file a claim in those circumstances and it was not a problem (as long as insurance was valid when the costs occured of course)

I do recommend insurance and getting it early so there are no pre-existing conditions. I like a combo of a lower premium for a higher deductable combined with putting the difference between the premiums into a savings account. I think Eva's is about $35/month so its really just about 2 dinners out in a month or what I saved switching my cell phone plan to prepaid.
 

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Where's the health testing on parents?
Asking those kind of questions after someone's already gotten the puppy is useless and also mean-spirited. People make mistakes, or have different priorities than you do. Stop trying to ruin other people's puppies for them.
 

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Asking those kind of questions after someone's already gotten the puppy is useless and also mean-spirited. People make mistakes, or have different priorities than you do. Stop trying to ruin other people's puppies for them.
They don't have the puppy yet.

Anyway, I was going to say that, for me, not having insurance has saved us probably $10,000 so far. The most we've ever had to pay was $800 for an x-ray for one of our dogs. I'm in the 'I'd rather save the money to use in the unlikelyhood that something actually happens' camp. But with a puppy with no health history, I'm not sure.
 

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They don't have the puppy yet.

Anyway, I was going to say that, for me, not having insurance has saved us probably $10,000 so far. The most we've ever had to pay was $800 for an x-ray for one of our dogs. I'm in the 'I'd rather save the money to use in the unlikelyhood that something actually happens' camp. But with a puppy with no health history, I'm not sure.
I am assuming your estimating savings of $10k by not paying insurance premiums is because you have multiple dogs at a time? That definitely changes the math.

Since a savings account could be used to pay for any of ones' dogs medical needs, its almost like a mini-insurance pool itself. Spreading the risk by effectively paying yourself the premium amount each month but not being limited on drawing it out.

One dog is a bit hard to calculate what is financially better. I figure that depending on breed and plan chosen, it probably starts at about $25/month for a puppy. So for say, $1000-1200, one could insure a dog for his first three years of life. That gets you past the puppy disease risk stage (in a high parvo area I think everyone should insure) and up to the age where things like hip dysplasia can be tested for. If the dog tests clean of everything testable and has not shown a tendancy towards high risk behaviors like inappropriate eating stuff, then the math probably leans towards self insuring by saving. But if a dog has a lifetime condition by that age, it will be covered as it is not pre existing (read the fine print of course) and keeping insurance makes more sense
 

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I am assuming your estimating savings of $10k by not paying insurance premiums is because you have multiple dogs at a time? That definitely changes the math.

Since a savings account could be used to pay for any of ones' dogs medical needs, its almost like a mini-insurance pool itself. Spreading the risk by effectively paying yourself the premium amount each month but not being limited on drawing it out.

One dog is a bit hard to calculate what is financially better. I figure that depending on breed and plan chosen, it probably starts at about $25/month for a puppy. So for say, $1000-1200, one could insure a dog for his first three years of life. That gets you past the puppy disease risk stage (in a high parvo area I think everyone should insure) and up to the age where things like hip dysplasia can be tested for. If the dog tests clean of everything testable and has not shown a tendancy towards high risk behaviors like inappropriate eating stuff, then the math probably leans towards self insuring by saving. But if a dog has a lifetime condition by that age, it will be covered as it is not pre existing (read the fine print of course) and keeping insurance makes more sense
Well, I was mostly talking about my almost 15yo dog, that we got at 8 weeks. Remember that insurance cost goes up as the dog gets older too. Consumer Report did a study and found that it was actually cheaper not to have insurance most of the time, even if your pet requires an expensive surgery (except Healthy Paws, where people saved $1000 after 12 years - again, that's because they actually decided to treat their 12yo dog for cancer, while I wouldn't put my dog through at that age in the first place). But anyway, premiums alone were $6000 and the dog wasn't even 12yo yet (and that's with Healthy Paws, others are worse).

I mean, I looked into insuring my newf at 1yo and it was like $80 a month with crazy deductibles. That's just nuts.
 

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From a broke college kid's perspective, insurance is invaluable to me. My dog is 15lbs, mixed breed, and almost 4 years old. He has been insured since the day I got him at 5 months old with no pre-existing conditions. I originally had ASPCA insurance because they pay for routine exams and the like, but switched when he was about a year old to Healthy Paws for more bang for my buck (no payout limits was a big factor). I pay ~$40 a month, a little less, for 90% coverage with a $100 deductible. I've considered increasing the deductible/lowering coverage to cut costs, but it really only saves me a couple bucks a month and I like the peace of mind.

I'm really really big on peace of mind, having grown up with parents who never were able to afford anything beyond the most basic care for their dogs and having to put down dogs that could have been saved if not for financial restrictions. I'm in college and work part time, so the savings that I have, while substantial for my age/situation, would be depleted really easily by so much as a night or two at an emergency vet. So his insurance costs me less than $500 per year, and if I didn't have it I probably wouldn't feel comfortable until I had at least $5000 in an account for vet emergencies alone (not including what I need for other emergencies). Saving that kind of money would take me quite some time, if I stopped going out and being a 20something year old and didn't go on vacation, and would take me even longer if I continued my current lifestyle.

I know that larger dogs are quite more expensive and insurance could be cost prohibitive as a monthly expense, especially if you have more than one. But at the same time, vet care in an emergency will also be more expensive, so you just have to think of it the same way as any size dog - can I afford an emergency/reasonable care? And if so, no need for insurance. But if not, IMO, it's necessary.

I'm more than happy to pay the $500 a year and know my dog is covered no matter what, that I only have to pay $100 and then 10% of whatever the bill is. I will never have to opt out of a treatment for financial reasons. To me, for my situation, this is the only responsible way to own a dog. So it definitely varies. I think if you can afford to reasonably care for your dog in an emergency (lets say, dog gets loose at 9pm on a Saturday and hit by a car and fractures hip/leg) or some type of treatable illness, then insurance probably isn't necessary. But for some people, me for example, I think it's the only reasonable thing to do.
 

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There are really only 2 circumstances for which I would get pet insurance:
1. If you have a breed with well-known health issues and are expecting to be spending a lot on vet visits.
2. If you are not in a financial position to be able to afford the cost of an emergency vet visit (surgery, etc.)

Other than those 2 things, it's generally cheaper not to get insurance. A lot of people just put that money into a separate account for their pets instead of spending it on insurance.

Personally if I did have pet insurance for my dogs (ages 6 and 4) I would have spent at least $3500 so far with nothing to show for it (they often don't cover routine exams, etc. anyway). The most I've ever spent at the vet was last year - about $400 for an x-ray.
 
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