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I am not a vet. Please do continue to explore this with your vet, or get a second opinion if your vet is not being as responsive as you'd like.

I'd say, as Lillith has, that the first few videos (and the incontinence) are consistent with seizures and post-seizure behavior. Seizures can be a symptom of an underlying ailment, like poisoning, brain tumors, or blood sugar regulation issues, but it's also pretty common for dogs to just have idiopathic epilepsy. (Worth noting: sometimes dogs that have idiopathic epileptic episodes as puppies grow out of them.) If it were my puppy, I would want a complete physical including blood work and possibly scans to eliminate other common causes of seizures, and if those were ruled out, then would explore epilepsy treatment options. There are various preventative meds and intervention meds and they each have their pros and cons. What's needed depends on the severity/frequency of the seizures and the dog's individual response to the various options. Good news is, the meds don't tend to be very expensive.

Physical wobbliness after a seizure is typical - it's called the "post-ictal" phase (the three main phases of a seizure are pre-ictal, ictus, and post-ictal) and the person or dog is typically tired, confused, disoriented, uncoordinated, agitated, etc.

Honestly, I agree with Lillith: the zoomies videos you posted look like pretty ordinary puppy zoomies to me. They might be uncharacteristically over-the-top for YOUR pup, if you have a more mellow baby, but they'd have been mild for my most recent psycho puppy. Since zoomies tend to happen when a dog is overstimulated and/or overtired, it wouldn't surprise me that a pup might have big zoomies followed by completely crashing to a sound sleep when coming out of the post-itctal phase of a seizure episode, since seizures are stressful and exhausting. Totally worth showing to a vet and discussing, and might be the result of the a seizure episode, but maybe not indicative of disorder itself, if that makes sense.
 
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