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Discussion Starter #1
My neighbour is one of the friendliest people you could ever meet. He’s in his early 50s with 4 young kids. A couple months ago, he got a husky puppy. She’s a beautiful dog, and I think anyone right for the breed would love her. That’s the problem.

It’s clear that my neighbour didn’t research the breed before they got her. Another case of: it’s a cool looking dog that will get me noticed. The family doesn’t do anything with her, they just throw her outside in the backyard for a couple hours a day. This ultimately results in her tearing up the backyard and digging holes, which they get mad at her for. Whenever the family is outside and playing and enjoying the weather, they never include the dog; she’s locked up in the backyard while they play in the front yard. I’ve never once seen them put a leash on her or ever take her for walks.

It seems like they overestimated how quick a dog can grow up and how demanding huskies are, since it seems like once she reached a certain size they rarely did anything with her. The novelty of having a puppy wore off. I feel bad for the dog, all she does is sit in the backyard and bark and howl, aggravating the other neighbours. I’m almost tempted to go over and offer to take their dog for walks and give her the physical and mental exercise she needs, as it’s not fair to her at all. Every time I’m out with our dogs she just watches us.

This is a perfect example why you need to look into the breed you’re interested in getting, and owning a dog in general. It’s not only you that suffers for the negligence, but for the dog as well.
 

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What a shame. I hate reading things like this. I guess it can't hurt to ask if you can walk her along with your own.
 

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I say it all the time.

If you want a dog to behave like a Labrador Retriever, then GET a Labrador Retriever!
 

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To be fair, I don't think breed is really the issue here. I don't think any dog would be happy with that kind of treatment.
 

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To be fair, I don't think breed is really the issue here. I don't think any dog would be happy with that kind of treatment.
Agree completely. No dog would be happy ignored and tossed out to fend for itself in the backyard everyday. A smaller dog might be less destructive but it would still be bored, likely would bark, still might tear up the yard.

And that INCLUDES Labs. Maybe an old Lab is relaxed but the Labs I know are far higher energy dogs than most people think they are.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Not saying breed’s really the issue, but it’s an important component to consider when deciding to get a dog. If you can’t dedicate the time/responsibility/commitment for a dog, don’t get a dog. Too many end up at shelters because of this.
 

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Breed IS an important consideration, but so is age...which I think is the biggest problem here. ANY puppy, as stated, is going to have issues being left in a yard and given minimal attention. However, adopting an older dog, they may not have had as much of an issue. I still don't think it is great for any dog to be left to its own devices, but a 5 y/o+ dog who is known to enjoy just hanging out and isn't high energy isn't going to be as bad as a young puppy of any breed.

So I would say researching both breeds you consider, and the amount of work a puppy takes. I was thoroughly prepared for a lot of work with a puppy and was STILL overwhelmed by how much work it was! And Quill was not a difficult puppy by any means.
 

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People who like their dogs for reasons unrelated to appearance are more likely to be tolerant of the dog and not banish it to the yard.

Which is to say if they wanted an active, bouncy, smart, did I mention active, dog, they might be more tolerant of it.

But yeah, it's a crappy life for any breed.
 
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