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Discussion Starter #1
Hello! I have been dealing with this rescue group, trying to work out something to get this little corgi mix pup, but now she has come down with parvo. They are treating her for it before I can meet her or anything but I'm concerned of long term damage from the disease. Does anyone know any long term effects parvo can cause? I know that the cardiac one can cause scars on the heart, and possible damages to the digestive tract with the intestinal parvo. That's about all I cloud find online (I did see a puppy get crippled from parvo on a vet show as well) so any information will be appreciated. I very much want to give this little sweety a home but I also want to know all the possible issues she might have. I'm not apposed to having a dog that needs a little extra care but if there will be lots of medical bills I couldn't do it just because of the money. so please help me! thank you for reading
 

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Long-term problems secondary to Parvovirus are really, really rare, so I don't think I would worry much about that particular problem. I have never heard of long-term damage to the digestive system, and this would be unlikely given the ability of the GI tract to heal quickly and replace cells as they are lost. Damage to the heart ("viral myocarditis") has been described but is so uncommon a problem that most vets will never get to see it. The real danger from Parvo is the acute one (dehydration, sepsis, death). With aggressive hospitalization the survival rate is very good and the vast, vast majority of dogs who get Parvo early in life (and live through it) go on to live fully normal lives.
 

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Are you thinking of distemper? That has terrible long term consequences. Parvo puppies usually heal up just fine, if they live.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you so much for your comment! I was not sure how common it was for them to have long term damage. The sites I checked out made it sound like these where typical for a dog to have after they were sick. oh! I read somewhere that they can carry the disease for the rest of their lives and that they could pass it on to other dogs later on in life. Also there was this one site that said that said that after a dog has had parvo their immune system could be no good. Do you know if these are true?
 

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I find all that very hard to believe. Parvo is deadly, don't get me wrong. Even with immediately, aggressive care, chances of survival are low, which is why vaccination is so important. But long term consequences are generally pretty rare. That's not to say this particular puppy will be fine. You'll have to wait and see.

As for carrying the disease and passing it on later in life, I've never heard of that. Parvo can live in the environment for a long, long time. If you've had parvo in your house or on your property, even with bleach treatment, you'd be well advised not to bring a puppy into the home or onto the property for several years. An already vaccinated dog would be fine.
 

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I actually don't know much about distemper, other than the virus can survive for years on a property that had animals affected by the disease and that its super contagious to many animals. I didn't know much about parvo till I heard that the rescue puppy had it, so I had to see what I might be dealing with. thank you for your answer though :)
 

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Even with immediately, aggressive care, chances of survival are low...
I think this remains one of the myths of veterinary medicine, often perpetuated by vets themselves. Parvo is certainly a very serious disease and requires aggressive treatment, but properly managed can have an excellent outcome. Previously on this board I published a link to an outpatent treatment protocol for Parvo from Colorado State University (http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/documents/parvo-outpatient-protocol-faq-companion-animal-studies.pdf). In the introduction to that protocol they note that the survival rate using this less expensive, "inferior" protocol was 80% compared to the standard of care protocol (hospitalization, IV fluids, injectable antibiotics, etc.) which had a survival of 90%. A number of the better critical care hospitals boast survival rates well in excess of 95%. Since the outpatient treatment produced a survival rate of 80% (with owners monitoring and giving medications) I hope that every vet could show better survival rates than that for hospitalized patients.

Amaryllis is correct that this virus is rather stable and once your environment is contaminated it will stay that way for quite some time, unless you can disinfect it effectively (difficult, except on solid surfaces).
 

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I think this remains one of the myths of veterinary medicine, often perpetuated by vets themselves. Don't get me wrong, Parvo is a very serious disease and requires aggressive treatment. Previously on this board I published a link to an outpatent treatment protocol for Parvo from Colorado State University (http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/documents/parvo-outpatient-protocol-faq-companion-animal-studies.pdf). In the introduction to that protocol they note that the survival rate using this less expensive, "inferior" protocol was 80% compared to the standard of care protocol (hospitalization, IV fluids, injectable antibiotics, etc.) which had a survival of 90%. A number of the better critical care hospitals boast survival rates well in excess of 95%. Since the outpatient treatment produced a survival rate of 80% (with owners monitoring and giving medications) I hope that every vet could show better survival rates than that for hospitalized patients.
You know, this is strange because I've read those stats and I don't disbelieve them,.-

My experience with foster pups with parvo was, even with hospital care and immediate treatment (from like punky and first throw up or loose stool), we had literally two puppies out of something like 26 survive. Whole litters broke, and it was over a span of a decade, a decade ago. It still makes me wonder what the heck was going on, though I know at least part of the more recent problems we've had with parvo in the area is that it's a particularly virulent, mutated strain (like fine to dead from blood loss within 24 hours).

That said, the survivors didn't have any lingering issues at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
oh wow, that's pretty bad, though I guess that's how I heard it before I really looked up anything. I guess all I can really do is wait and see how it goes for her. Thank you for your comment CptJack
 

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My experience with foster pups with parvo was, even with hospital care and immediate treatment (from like punky and first throw up or loose stool), we had literally two puppies out of something like 26 survive...I know at least part of the more recent problems we've had with parvo in the area is that it's a particularly virulent, mutated strain (like fine to dead from blood loss within 24 hours).
Parvo treatment has come a long way over the past few years, and although there is a lot of finesse to treating it properly, the supplies and tools are found in every veterinary hospital: IV fluids, properly selected antibiotics, feeding support, etc. In our hospital every Parvo dog is checked every day for electrolytes, white blood cell count, and albumin/total protein levels. Blood glucose (sugar) levels are checked at least twice daily. Patients are checked twice daily for body weight, and are assessed every 6 hours for hydration status and blood pressure. These little touches really help to boost survival because we catch small problems before they escalate.
I just returned from a critical care conference, with one of the lectures being devoted to IV fluid therapy. The instructor polled the class as to their choice(s) of antibiotics and also how they determined a fluid rate for treating Parvo. 65% of the attendees (all of which were practicing veterinarians) made poor selections for antibiotics and 85% made inadequate fluid choices. So sometimes I think the problem isn't the technology available for treating this disease; it is the level of knowledge of how to produce the best outcome...
I agree that from year to year there are certainly changes in the specific types of Parvo that are seen, and both the number of cases seen and the mortality periodically worsens. I suspect that this is related to the specific virulence of the strain making the rounds at that time.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great news!! The little sweety is out of the hospital and doing fantastic! Running around and bugging her foster siblings :) she won't be able to be adopted out for about 3-4 weeks due to being contagious but sounds like shes going to be alright! thank you guys for your help, and feel free to keep posting, I really find your information very helpful. Knowledge is our best weapon to prevent or conquer disease :)
 

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RE: "A number of the better critical care hospitals boast survival rates well in excess of 95%. Since the outpatient treatment produced a survival rate of 80% (with owners monitoring and giving medications) I hope that every vet could show better survival rates than that for hospitalized patients."

Amazing!!! Great to know. As you suggest, even 10 years ago, there was little chance of survival. And, many of us older than 40, remember when a puppy with parvo or distemper was an immediate death sentence. Thanks!
 

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I had a parvo puppy. Poor thing was only 8 weeks old and it was a nightmare but thankfully she pulled through. Was at the vets for 3 days/night and then they let her come home but still on antibiotics and was only eating baby food at the time. Total recovery was about a month post vet stay, took that long for her to have normal stools. She is now almost 8 years old and doing great!
 

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I had a parvo puppy. Poor thing was only 8 weeks old and it was a nightmare but thankfully she pulled through. Was at the vets for 3 days/night and then they let her come home but still on antibiotics and was only eating baby food at the time. Total recovery was about a month post vet stay, took that long for her to have normal stools. She is now almost 8 years old and doing great!
Thank you! I'm so happy to hear from someone that has had first hand experience with a parvo puppy that got better with no after effects. thank you for your comment it makes me feel more at ease about trying to get this puppy :)
 
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