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Discussion Starter #1

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that would be about right, a few years ago my dog dakoda got parvo and my mom, I LOVE HER had a vet that saved him and took payments to pay it off ;).. he got it from roaming dog in the neighborhood!!!

now, y 2 dogs have had their parvo shots and everything up to date, and we do not take them anywhere where it we think is "questionable"...

i am glad your pup is ok and lived..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thank you. so am i. he is now 2 years old and happy and healthy!
 

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I agree 100%. A simple vaccine is so much better than the chance your pup would have fighting the parvo virus. I've seen too many puppies die from the disease and believe me it is just a terrible way for them to go. Certain breeds Pitbulls, Rotties, and Dobes are more susceptible to this disease than others.
 

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Parvo is transmitted feces to oral and it takes a VERY small amount to transfer. Plus it can live in an outdoor environment for up to a year.

Say a parvo dog has a bowel movement in some grass, a year later if an unvaccinated pup walks past that place they could get it by sniffing the ground or licking their paws later on. There doesn't even have to be an actual bowel movement. It could be enough for the dog with parvo to have sat down in an area.

That is why it's so important not to bring young pups in areas where other dogs have been. Adult dogs that have been vaccinated can get very mild cases of parvo and pass it around because the owners might not even realize they are sick. It's really not that dangerous to a vaccinated adult but to an unvaccinated or not fully vaccinated puppy it is not something you want to deal with.

Signs of parvo are loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting, and diarrhea that turns bloody. It also has a very distinct smell that once you smell it you will never forget.

The puppies that I've dealt with who have parvo (fosters brought in from shelters) often have the signs come on very quickly. They just lose their appetite out of nowhere and become very lethargic. As soon as I see those signs they get their behinds rushed into the e-vet. When caught early in a pup past 8 weeks of age there is up to 95% survivability. It has to be caught early though and treatment must start ASAP. There is no cure for parvo since it's a virus but they can be given IV fluids and medications to help with the vomiting and diarrhea.

If anyone ever suspects their puppy might have parvo it's very important to let the vet know as you head over. Often they will have the pup come in using a different entrance to avoid transmission to the other dogs at the vets.
 
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