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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
hey i have a 2.5 month old golden retriever puppy and he is not shy at all around other dogs. He gets veryy excited around every dog he approaches and jumps on them invading their space and i notice angers many dogs or scares small shy ones. I want him to be calm and respectful around other dogs not go crazy. Right now might not be such a problem but when he grows up i can see this becoming more difficult to deal with and best to train him as early as possible. Any advice much appreciated
 

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If you can find one, I would recommend a puppy socialization class at a training center and play dates with well behaved older dogs who know proper ways to correct and play. The best way for your puppy to learn how to properly greet and play with other dogs will be to get corrections (proper corrections, though) from other dogs so the puppy can see what is acceptable and what is not acceptable during play.

Despite Quill's quirks and over excitement issues -- and over excitement is a huge issue with him with people and used to be with dogs -- he greets and plays with every dog (from puppies to small dogs to dogs his size) amazingly and respects other dogs' warning signs if things do get too rough. We did weekly puppy play classes until he was about 6-7 months.
 

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I agree, try a puppy play group with professionals who know when a puppy needs some human intervention. It is totally normal for puppies to act that way. They're like toddlers and don't know social norms yet, but as they mature and grow they do learn how to properly behave around other dogs.
 

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Puppies need to learn how to communicate with other dogs, just like human children need to learn to talk. The only way is trial and error and, experience. Doggy day care, beginner obedience classes and, any other dog social events are great ways to allow your puppy to gain the experience he needs with other dogs.

All they know at first is people, they bounce, yip, get all excited to greet you and, you greet them in return with pets and laughs - they think that's how to communicate "happy to see you, I want to interact with you." to other dogs as well until they gain experience and learn better communication skills.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I agree, try a puppy play group with professionals who know when a puppy needs some human intervention. It is totally normal for puppies to act that way. They're like toddlers and don't know social norms yet, but as they mature and grow they do learn how to properly behave around other dogs.
If you can find one, I would recommend a puppy socialization class at a training center and play dates with well behaved older dogs who know proper ways to correct and play. The best way for your puppy to learn how to properly greet and play with other dogs will be to get corrections (proper corrections, though) from other dogs so the puppy can see what is acceptable and what is not acceptable during play.

Despite Quill's quirks and over excitement issues -- and over excitement is a huge issue with him with people and used to be with dogs -- he greets and plays with every dog (from puppies to small dogs to dogs his size) amazingly and respects other dogs' warning signs if things do get too rough. We did weekly puppy play classes until he was about 6-7 months.
thanks guys. hard finding in my area puppy play groups/socialization classes. what about taking him to an offleash dog park?not sure if be too much for him?
 

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An offleash dogpark is a gamble. Some people bring their unsocialized dogs to learn socialization, at the expense of everyone else. And, some folks don't understand and bring dogs that get over-excited or even aggressive when they see other dogs running.

You might visit the dog parks are various times, without your dog, to observe and interact with both dogs and owners. Many parks have informal groups that meet at the same time, and some of those groups may consist of knowledgeable, experienced owners. You'll be able to recognize the groups, and you can go meet and greet. If you feel like you're intruding, then you may have your answer, as far as this being a safe place for your puppy. But, if you are welcomed by warm people, who make you feel invited to join, you can explain your situation and concerns ... and may be further invited to bring your pup for socialization. Stay a while and observe how the dogs interact, and how the owners interact with [or ignore] their dogs ... Be alert that owners who hover and constantly correct may not be good with their dogs, just as owners who seem barely aware of their dogs and never raise their voices may not be bad.
 

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Puppies need to learn how to communicate with other dogs, just like human children need to learn to talk. The only way is trial and error and, experience. Doggy day care, beginner obedience classes and, any other dog social events are great ways to allow your puppy to gain the experience he needs with other dogs.

All they know at first is people, they bounce, yip, get all excited to greet you and, you greet them in return with pets and laughs - they think that's how to communicate "happy to see you, I want to interact with you." to other dogs as well until they gain experience and learn better communication skills.
An offleash dogpark is a gamble. Some people bring their unsocialized dogs to learn socialization, at the expense of everyone else. And, some folks don't understand and bring dogs that get over-excited or even aggressive when they see other dogs running.

You might visit the dog parks are various times, without your dog, to observe and interact with both dogs and owners. Many parks have informal groups that meet at the same time, and some of those groups may consist of knowledgeable, experienced owners. You'll be able to recognize the groups, and you can go meet and greet. If you feel like you're intruding, then you may have your answer, as far as this being a safe place for your puppy. But, if you are welcomed by warm people, who make you feel invited to join, you can explain your situation and concerns ... and may be further invited to bring your pup for socialization. Stay a while and observe how the dogs interact, and how the owners interact with [or ignore] their dogs ... Be alert that owners who hover and constantly correct may not be good with their dogs, just as owners who seem barely aware of their dogs and never raise their voices may not be bad.
thanks yeh best i stay away from offleash parks for now dont want to risk him getting hurt and try get him around friendly dogs. Another option someone mentioned is doggyday care. in 2 weeks Im actually leaving the country for 5 days, instead of leaving him with my parents i could leave him at a doggyday care. Is leaving him there for 5 days a good idea? or less days? worry he might feel abandoned or something

thanks
 

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Doggy Day Care is not overnight, for that you'll need a boarding kennel or, have your parents take him to day care each day. I know many city pups that go to day care everyday for their entire lives.

If you board him, make sure it's a reputable kennel and not one that just lets the dogs sit in a small pen or cage all day.
 

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Vet your daycares carefully, too. Some do a really great job at evaluating each pup individually and putting together small play groups based on personality and play style, supervise well, make sure the dogs have regular breaks to calm down as appropriate, are super conscientious about dogs having access to water (and shade/shelter if outside), medications if necessary, etc. Others just throw all the dogs together and don't intervene unless blood gets drawn, often because they're critically understaffed and one person is supposed to be watching 20+ animals. Most are somewhere in between. I'd definitely visit facilities and see if you can get a tour and talk to them about how they work before sending an impressionable young pup to one - just know you may not be able to actually go inside their play area to observe the dogs due to liability reasons.

Also, like most things, some dogs do great at daycare and some not so much. Some dogs find it stressful and overwhelming, and for others it just lets them practice being amped up and overstimulated all day, which can lead to difficulty relaxing at home and overexcitement around other dogs. Just keep an eye on your pup and evaluate how it works for him, personally!

I'd avoid any really tiny operations out of people's homes UNLESS they can prove they're fully insured to operate as a daycare, btw. This protects you if, dog forbid, anything happens to your dog in their care.

Have you checked on sites like Facebook or Meetup to see if you have any kind of "dog training" or "dog club" groups in your area? Or even in a nearby city? These are the kind of people who may be able to tell you where to go locally, or even offer a doggy playdate themselves.
 
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