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This was my intro post: http://www.dogforums.com/attention-all-new-members/196353-new-here-need-advice.html#post2162825

Our new fur-baby, Lyra, may be part Chow Chow, and this may be why she - according to her previous owners - practically house-trained herself. She's only had an accident inside once so far, and I think it was because she was really scared of thunder, and then my husband came home from work and knocked on the door during a thunderstorm. That said, she's TOO eager to go outside. She begs, whines/cries, and scratches at EVERY door in the house constantly. We presume she does this to go "see the bunnies" - we live in a mostly rural area and there are a lot of rabbits that frequent our and our neighbors' yards. When we do take her outside, she wants to walk around, look around, sniff the air, etc. She usually appears to have no interest in doing her business. We're having a very hard time distinguishing between urgent bathroom break-time and urgent bunny-watching time. It seems as though she "gets a bug up her butt" to go outside and there is no end to it. We can't figure out what is wrong. We take her on long walks when we can, but we do not have a fence or a doggy door, so she is not able to come and go as she pleases as she was able to at her previous house.
This dilemma frustrates and exhausts us. We are having difficulty seeing her side of this, other than "I want to go out so you have to take me, NOW." I'm sure there's some explanation and that somehow or another its our fault, it's just really hard to figure it out.

Here is some additional info:
We need to figure out a way to create a more consistent exercise regimen for her. We have been taking her on maybe one or two long walks a day. It's crazy hot here in Oklahoma right now, and we're both also badly out of shape :eek: , so we're trying to do the best we can but it's quite difficult at this time. We know we need to do better, but it's also a bit confusing. Should we schedule a noon bathroom break with a long walk every day, in addition to a long walk at another time during the early evening hours, and try to get into a routine like that? That sounds pretty doable, just a bit daunting in the heat and with the bugs. :eek:

As far as our outdoor area goes, the options for a dog we have researched are not currently financially possible. We have 2.5 acres, but to fence it all would cost somewhere around $10,000, and doing what we want by creating something like a 'dog run' that would be attached to our shed which would have an A/C and be converted into an awesome dog house, would cost at least $3,000 (it would be a space about 2500 sq ft, so not small by any means).
It's been awhile since we've looked into our options, as we had been planning on adding a dog to our family for awhile, so it's possible there is an option we haven't yet thought of.


Lyra is almost five years old and we've had her for approximately a month and a half.
We will probably get one of those mail-in DNA tests done once we're sure we are going to be keeping her.

We've taken her to the vet once because she wouldn't eat or drink and also had a weird cough/wheeze which may have just been reverse sneezing (this lasted for only one morning and then went away). She was tested for heartworm and is negative. She had a blood panel done and everything was normal. She had been very itchy, and the previous owners said that they had just treated her for fleas, but I know that some dogs can be allergic to flea saliva... the vet prescribed some steroids to help with the itching (which it has, tremendously) and a good side effect of the medicine was that it increased her appetite. We switched her food around the time that we got her, and then modified it again approximately two weeks ago. Her previous owners, while lovely people, bit off more than they could chew as far as pets were concerned, and had too many with not enough finances. The food they considered expensive was what we consider junk, and in addition Lyra wasn't very interested in it. She wouldn't eat it at all for awhile once we first took her home, and we had to add the wet version to the dry in order to get her interested in it at all. (Even the food we have her on now isn't what we would like to feed her, but the vet recommends this brand for both cats and dogs with sensitive skin, and prefers it to the more natural brands for some reason.)

She also has a few additional behavioral issues. She is very uneasy around strangers, to the point where she seems aggressive. She was nearly impossible to bring to the vet. She growled, barked, cried, snarled and just generally freaked out whenever either the vet or the assistant (both of whom were female - so it's not a fear of men) tried to get close to her. They weren't even able to get a temperature because she was so worked up. They recommend that we spend time socializing her, which will include bringing her to the vet frequently just to say hello. The obstacle here is that we live 20 minutes away from the nearest place to 'be social'. Also, if we are definitely keeping her, we will be bringing her to a different vet, because they offer better long-term plans and payment options that include free visits, annual dental, discounts, etc. The reason we went to this particular vet this time around was because we and our family have had positive experiences with them before, and for just a single emergency visit they seemed to be a more affordable option (seemed being the opportune word, as we ended up paying much more there than we would have if we had just started them on the plan at the other place).

Another behavioral issue is excessive barking, and I think this might have to do with her wariness of strangers. She perceives very slight disturbances outside to be threats (at least this is what appears to be the case) and will bark at the house and doors creaking/settling, at bugs hitting the windows, and at shadows shifting outside. When she finds something worthy of barking at, she will usually run to a window and will bark for approximately a two minute period, gradually winding down as she realizes that there is no reason to be alarmed.

We have our own behavioral issues as humans. We're not really sure how to tell her to stop barking, as we would like her to be alert in the case of an actual threat, but there are a lot of animals and insects out here, much more than there are human threats. We're not sure how to command her to stop, either, as we've read that just saying "no" is not ideal because it's not an actual specific command, but it's not a "leave it" issue, either, is it? Perhaps "hush"? And how loudly should we say it? We are also really bad about wanting to calm her, as I've read that what we perceive to be soothing can be perceived as rewarding to dogs.

It's hard to pick and choose which of these are the biggest and most pertinent issue. It's possible that last week she was having some digestion issues and thus asking to go out more often, as well. She did seem to be slightly irregular.

In addition to all this, we have the cat training/integration going on, so it's all quite overwhelming.
I apologize for the enormous post and thank you for reading it!
 

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That said, she's TOO eager to go outside. She begs, whines/cries, and scratches at EVERY door in the house constantly. We presume she does this to go "see the bunnies" - we live in a mostly rural area and there are a lot of rabbits that frequent our and our neighbors' yards. 1When we do take her outside, she wants to walk around, look around, sniff the air, etc. She usually appears to have no interest in doing her business. We're having a very hard time distinguishing between urgent bathroom break-time and urgent bunny-watching time. It seems as though she "gets a bug up her butt" to go outside and there is no end to it. We can't figure out what is wrong. 2We take her on long walks when we can, 3but we do not have a fence or a doggy door, so she is not able to come and go as she pleases as she was able to at her previous house.
1: Don't allow her to do that. Set a potty schedule for her and take her out consistently. Ask her to go potty and if she doesn't, take her back inside for a while. Don't allow her to go goof off during potty times.
2: I'm confused by this. Does this mean she does not get regular exercise? For this dog, I would be taking her on two walks a day, each about 45 minutes. Part of this restlessness in the house could be from lack of exercise.
3: This could also be it. She's used to being able to go in an out (which is not safe, by the way)


We need to figure out a way to create a more consistent exercise regimen for her. We have been taking her on maybe one or two long walks a day. It's crazy hot here in Oklahoma right now, and we're both also badly out of shape :eek: , so we're trying to do the best we can but it's quite difficult at this time. We know we need to do better, but it's also a bit confusing. Should we schedule a noon bathroom break with a long walk every day, in addition to a long walk at another time during the early evening hours, and try to get into a routine like that? That sounds pretty doable, just a bit daunting in the heat and with the bugs.
Okay, just got to this part. Depending on the heat, I would take her once in the morning, and once in the evening when it's cooler. In the mean time, work with her on training and playing games with her in the house that can work her mind. This is good exercise as well.
Something you could also do is rig up a pulley/trolley system in your yard and attach her to that with a secure harness and toss a ball around for her and let her get some of her bunny watching in. Supervise her, though.


Lyra is almost five years old and we've had her for approximately a month and a half.
We will probably get one of those mail-in DNA tests done once we're sure we are going to be keeping her.
They're unreliable. They're mostly for fun if you've got about $50 extra laying around.


(Even the food we have her on now isn't what we would like to feed her, but the vet recommends this brand for both cats and dogs with sensitive skin, and prefers it to the more natural brands for some reason.)
Is it something you have to buy from his office? Speaking honestly, vets will sometimes recommend a food they sell just to sell it...


She also has a few additional behavioral issues. She is very uneasy around strangers, to the point where she seems aggressive. She was nearly impossible to bring to the vet. She growled, barked, cried, snarled and just generally freaked out whenever either the vet or the assistant (both of whom were female - so it's not a fear of men) tried to get close to her. They weren't even able to get a temperature because she was so worked up. They recommend that we spend time socializing her, which will include bringing her to the vet frequently just to say hello. The obstacle here is that we live 20 minutes away from the nearest place to 'be social'.
If she is Chow, this could be considered normal. They are not an overly friendly dog, especially with strangers. For now, don't force any interaction on her. Socialization is good but pushing her into it is not. Just take her places you can, when you can, and make it a positive experience for her.
 

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Are you doing any actual training? Walks may tire her muscles but her brain is in overdrive because of her age and changing households. Use part of her dinner if she likes it enough and teach her stuff. Just giving her a kibble and praising her using her name is a good bonding exercise. Closing the kibble in a fist and only letting her have it once she stops mugging your fist is really good too. Sit, down, stay are other good ones of course. I did this plus actual clicker training for about half the dogs' meals twice a day for years. Really pays off.

I wouldn't let her just pace endlessly if that is what she is doing. Put a leash on her and have her lay at your feet for at least half an hour once a day. This is amazingly difficult for stressed out young dogs. When I did this with Sassy you could practically see her pushing herself down. When in the house close off rooms so she cannot explore away from you. Might help with the cat thing as well. No, will help. I don't have cats but kept prey crazy Sassy from ever hurting the bunny by keeping 2 doors between them at all times. Baby gates or hooks that let doors open enough for cats but not the dog are good ideas.

For the anxious wanting to go out? We went through this when I put a bell on the door. Max was delighted to have that signal and would ring the bell a couple minutes after he came back in the house. After a few days of that I just started only letting him out once an hour. For some reason that really helped and helped quite fast. I wouldn't want to count on house training carrying over from her previous home and take out new dogs often for the first week and slow down the second week to every couple hours and then try to do the morning, noon and evening walks.

When the dogs bark I notice and let them know I took care of the problem and thanks for letting me know about the leaves in the wind or that dog barking 3 houses away and get them away from where they were barking. Sometimes I take the collar, but always remove from the room and ask them to come in the house. Both dogs will yell several times a day but we only tolerate a few barks per episode. They are dogs and since the beginnings of human/canine association their job was to alert. Have a dog, going to get some barking. Sure don't like all that though.

Ginger has been here less than 3 weeks and I am not willing to let her in the back yard alone but Max is not happy not being allowed to use his dog door. I compromised by putting up the monster 4' tall exercise pen around the back door which is in a corner. Now the dogs can go in and out the door and have about an 8x8' spot to lounge around in the sun/shade. They had better not be pottying in there however! The pen is very heavy and on level concrete anchored at either end. Don't think either dog is that driven to test it, we will see. Any who, perhaps a temporary fence might work. Tall roll of fencing and spikes on the bottom to keep it from riding up so she cannot get underneath? Use something you can use in the future dog run perhaps.

Ginger had been with us for 22 hours when we took her to the vet due to horrible fleas. The vet tech couldn't take her temperature either and the vet didn't even try to listen to her heart or anything. Ginger wasn't snapping or growling but she was whipping her head around and dancing so she couldn't be handled. At that point in our relationship I hadn't handled her much but I could pick her up and give her scritches. I wouldn't decide your new dog is aggressive or reactive based on you being brand new to one another and she was horrible at the vet. Taking her with you as much as possible would be a good idea and pair human interactions with lots of really good cookies like boiled white meat chicken or deli meat. As well as getting her used to the idea that people are cookie machines handle her all over. Pinch her skin lightly all over, get her comfortable with pulling her feet at slightly odd angles gently move all her toes, look under her tail, brush her regularly, check those ears and mouth, hold her still in various ways. Not all at once, just move to more invasive handling as you and she feel comfortable. If she is leery of getting brushed then call it a nice grooming after stroking her with your hands for a minute and giving one actual stroke with the brush for instance. When you can take her to the vet and get her weighed, walk her through the parking lot, through the waiting room if there aren't other animals in there and whatever else you can think up.
 

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First off, mental exercise is every bit as important and helpful as physical exercise. Think of the last time that you had to do "paperwork" or take a test. Think about the last time you tried to file your own taxes. How tired were you afterward? It's the same for dogs. Look into toys that will stimulate their brains... A couple of good examples are Tug-A-Jug and the Buster Cube. The idea is to put a little bit of their kibble inside the toy and let them figure out how to get it out. The toys are reasonably inexpensive at $10-$15.

I am personally against things like "Doggy Doors". When you allow the dog to decide when they want to go outside, you are giving them a certain amount of "control" that is reserved for the Alpha Dog in the pack. No pack leader in nature will allow member dogs to make their own decisions about -anything-. If you are to be the leader in your home, decisions on when they go out and for what reason are up to you. Establish a feeding schedule and then build a schedule around that for when potty breaks are required. It won't take you long to figure them out if you haven't already.

When taking her out after she indicates needing to go out, do not let her wander around and do whatever she wants. Give her 2-3 minutes to do what she needs to do, then take her directly back in the house. No pomp, no circumstance. After coming back in, do not take her back outside for at least 10-15 minutes. And, it should be when YOU decide it's time.

If you're concerned about her messing in the house, use a crate for her. When you bring her back in after not going, put her in her crate so she won't mess and she'll just relax. Again, no pomp or circumstance here. It's not a punishment, it's part of the routine. If she goes outside and goes, she gets to come in a have a bit of free roaming. If she doesn't go, she goes in her crate.

For being outside, you can do a number of things:

- Use a long lead (50') that she can just drag. Go out with her, interact with her, play with her. But, don't leave her out there unattended. A portion of that lead should always being within reach if you're playing with her, and you can grab it easily if she tries to run.
- Fence a portion of the yard. This would be something to consider if you need to leave her outside for longer periods unattended and/or you need to let her out at night and want to keep animals away.
- Electric Fence for some of the yard. Same idea as above, but nothing to look at for you. The downside is that it doesn't keep animals out.
- Use a training collar to train her in the exact same way that electric fence works, except you provide the feedback instead of the wire in the ground.

Generally, you don't want her outside unless she's supervised, and NEVER use a dog run (it's actually dangerous for the dog - they can break their neck, and I've seen it happen to a family member's dog).
 

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I am personally against things like "Doggy Doors". When you allow the dog to decide when they want to go outside, you are giving them a certain amount of "control" that is reserved for the Alpha Dog in the pack. No pack leader in nature will allow member dogs to make their own decisions about -anything-. If you are to be the leader in your home, decisions on when they go out and for what reason are up to you. Establish a feeding schedule and then build a schedule around that for when potty breaks are required. It won't take you long to figure them out if you haven't already.

When taking her out after she indicates needing to go out, do not let her wander around and do whatever she wants. Give her 2-3 minutes to do what she needs to do, then take her directly back in the house. No pomp, no circumstance. After coming back in, do not take her back outside for at least 10-15 minutes. And, it should be when YOU decide it's time.

If you're concerned about her messing in the house, use a crate for her. When you bring her back in after not going, put her in her crate so she won't mess and she'll just relax. Again, no pomp or circumstance here. It's not a punishment, it's part of the routine. If she goes outside and goes, she gets to come in a have a bit of free roaming. If she doesn't go, she goes in her crate.
I can tell you right now you are not going to be popular around here lol... Human-dog dominance does not exist. Dominance theory has been debunked. Potty breaks are not about someone having control over the dog to a point where they decided whether or not the dog can/cannot pee -- it's about teaching the dog where/when it is appropriate to go, and putting her on a schedule so that her body can also get used to this same schedule. It's not at all about being the "alpha dog".
 

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I am personally against things like "Doggy Doors". When you allow the dog to decide when they want to go outside, you are giving them a certain amount of "control" that is reserved for the Alpha Dog in the pack. No pack leader in nature will allow member dogs to make their own decisions about -anything-. If you are to be the leader in your home, decisions on when they go out and for what reason are up to you
I hate to break it to you, but dog -> human dominance does not exist. Despite whatever you've heard on TV, science has disproven "alpha" and "pack theory" with dogs for years. Dogs aren't wolves, and we aren't dogs. Wolves don't even work that way.

My suggestion would be that you educate yourself a little bit before giving out misinformation.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
1: Don't allow her to do that. Set a potty schedule for her and take her out consistently. Ask her to go potty and if she doesn't, take her back inside for a while. Don't allow her to go goof off during potty times.
2: I'm confused by this. Does this mean she does not get regular exercise? For this dog, I would be taking her on two walks a day, each about 45 minutes. Part of this restlessness in the house could be from lack of exercise.
3: This could also be it. She's used to being able to go in an out (which is not safe, by the way)



Okay, just got to this part. Depending on the heat, I would take her once in the morning, and once in the evening when it's cooler. In the mean time, work with her on training and playing games with her in the house that can work her mind. This is good exercise as well.
Something you could also do is rig up a pulley/trolley system in your yard and attach her to that with a secure harness and toss a ball around for her and let her get some of her bunny watching in. Supervise her, though.
I've never looked up a pulley/trolley system before, so now I will have to do so. When she sees a bunny, she doesn't just want to watch it, she wants to GO FOR IT, so we'd wonder and worry about the strength of the system - whether it would be strong enough or too strong. We wouldn't want her to get loose and we wouldn't want her to hurt herself. I don't know how much force they can withstand, but when she 'goes for it' she is able to nearly pull herself free from us. She also gnaws on her leash when she does this, so we'd definitely want it to be something sturdy, but our main concern would be her hurting herself by going 'all out' while harnessed and ending up hurting herself.


They're unreliable. They're mostly for fun if you've got about $50 extra laying around.




Is it something you have to buy from his office? Speaking honestly, vets will sometimes recommend a food they sell just to sell it...
We go through Banfield, which is inside Petsmart, and they do not make anything off of food sold there, at least not directly.



[QUTOE]If she is Chow, this could be considered normal. They are not an overly friendly dog, especially with strangers. For now, don't force any interaction on her. Socialization is good but pushing her into it is not. Just take her places you can, when you can, and make it a positive experience for her.[/QUOTE]

When we first looked up Chow information, we found similar information. The vet we took her to recently insisted that we socialize her, for fear that she would hurt someone. I believe that had I not been there to restrain her, she would have attacked and bitten the vet and tech. We appreciate the sense of security this gives us while we are at home, but do not want something to happen in public or unprovoked, especially if it means that she would then have to be "punished" by law.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Are you doing any actual training? Walks may tire her muscles but her brain is in overdrive because of her age and changing households. Use part of her dinner if she likes it enough and teach her stuff. Just giving her a kibble and praising her using her name is a good bonding exercise. Closing the kibble in a fist and only letting her have it once she stops mugging your fist is really good too. Sit, down, stay are other good ones of course. I did this plus actual clicker training for about half the dogs' meals twice a day for years. Really pays off.
Unfortunately she's a very picky eater. She will only very rarely eat her kibble dry - we usually have to mix it with the wet version of the same brand food. I don't know how possible this is with wet food.

I wouldn't let her just pace endlessly if that is what she is doing. Put a leash on her and have her lay at your feet for at least half an hour once a day. This is amazingly difficult for stressed out young dogs. When I did this with Sassy you could practically see her pushing herself down. When in the house close off rooms so she cannot explore away from you. Might help with the cat thing as well. No, will help. I don't have cats but kept prey crazy Sassy from ever hurting the bunny by keeping 2 doors between them at all times. Baby gates or hooks that let doors open enough for cats but not the dog are good ideas.
She seems to be relatively calm, perhaps even sad, most of the time. It's usually around a certain time of day that she gets this 'sixth sense', starts staring out the windows and realizes there are bunnies out there, and then starts begging to go out. We built our own gate/door with slots in it, so the cats and the dog can sniff and see each other through it, but cannot actually get to each other. We don't have rooms that she can get into without supervision, either.

For the anxious wanting to go out? We went through this when I put a bell on the door. Max was delighted to have that signal and would ring the bell a couple minutes after he came back in the house. After a few days of that I just started only letting him out once an hour. For some reason that really helped and helped quite fast. I wouldn't want to count on house training carrying over from her previous home and take out new dogs often for the first week and slow down the second week to every couple hours and then try to do the morning, noon and evening walks.

When the dogs bark I notice and let them know I took care of the problem and thanks for letting me know about the leaves in the wind or that dog barking 3 houses away and get them away from where they were barking. Sometimes I take the collar, but always remove from the room and ask them to come in the house. Both dogs will yell several times a day but we only tolerate a few barks per episode. They are dogs and since the beginnings of human/canine association their job was to alert. Have a dog, going to get some barking. Sure don't like all that though.

Ginger has been here less than 3 weeks and I am not willing to let her in the back yard alone but Max is not happy not being allowed to use his dog door. I compromised by putting up the monster 4' tall exercise pen around the back door which is in a corner. Now the dogs can go in and out the door and have about an 8x8' spot to lounge around in the sun/shade. They had better not be pottying in there however! The pen is very heavy and on level concrete anchored at either end. Don't think either dog is that driven to test it, we will see. Any who, perhaps a temporary fence might work. Tall roll of fencing and spikes on the bottom to keep it from riding up so she cannot get underneath? Use something you can use in the future dog run perhaps.
At her previous home she had jumped a six ft privacy fence, so we're not very eager to try temporary solutions like that, but I will look into it.

Ginger had been with us for 22 hours when we took her to the vet due to horrible fleas. The vet tech couldn't take her temperature either and the vet didn't even try to listen to her heart or anything. Ginger wasn't snapping or growling but she was whipping her head around and dancing so she couldn't be handled. At that point in our relationship I hadn't handled her much but I could pick her up and give her scritches. I wouldn't decide your new dog is aggressive or reactive based on you being brand new to one another and she was horrible at the vet. Taking her with you as much as possible would be a good idea and pair human interactions with lots of really good cookies like boiled white meat chicken or deli meat. As well as getting her used to the idea that people are cookie machines handle her all over. Pinch her skin lightly all over, get her comfortable with pulling her feet at slightly odd angles gently move all her toes, look under her tail, brush her regularly, check those ears and mouth, hold her still in various ways. Not all at once, just move to more invasive handling as you and she feel comfortable. If she is leery of getting brushed then call it a nice grooming after stroking her with your hands for a minute and giving one actual stroke with the brush for instance. When you can take her to the vet and get her weighed, walk her through the parking lot, through the waiting room if there aren't other animals in there and whatever else you can think up.
At the time that we took her to the vet I think that she was already comfortable with us. She tried using me as a shield, "hugging me", and jumping into my lap at the vet's. She seemed scared and seeking my protection. I'm not really sure what the reason behind that behavior is.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
First off, mental exercise is every bit as important and helpful as physical exercise. Think of the last time that you had to do "paperwork" or take a test. Think about the last time you tried to file your own taxes. How tired were you afterward? It's the same for dogs. Look into toys that will stimulate their brains... A couple of good examples are Tug-A-Jug and the Buster Cube. The idea is to put a little bit of their kibble inside the toy and let them figure out how to get it out. The toys are reasonably inexpensive at $10-$15.
We are going to try something like that or a Kong soon.

I am personally against things like "Doggy Doors". When you allow the dog to decide when they want to go outside, you are giving them a certain amount of "control" that is reserved for the Alpha Dog in the pack. No pack leader in nature will allow member dogs to make their own decisions about -anything-. If you are to be the leader in your home, decisions on when they go out and for what reason are up to you. Establish a feeding schedule and then build a schedule around that for when potty breaks are required. It won't take you long to figure them out if you haven't already.

When taking her out after she indicates needing to go out, do not let her wander around and do whatever she wants. Give her 2-3 minutes to do what she needs to do, then take her directly back in the house. No pomp, no circumstance. After coming back in, do not take her back outside for at least 10-15 minutes. And, it should be when YOU decide it's time.

If you're concerned about her messing in the house, use a crate for her. When you bring her back in after not going, put her in her crate so she won't mess and she'll just relax. Again, no pomp or circumstance here. It's not a punishment, it's part of the routine. If she goes outside and goes, she gets to come in a have a bit of free roaming. If she doesn't go, she goes in her crate.
She, in what I've read to be typical Chow behavior, abhors the very thought of messing inside. She house-trained herself but she does also have a crate that we use at night and we've tried using it to calm her as well, but she doesn't really like it in there. She will, very mournfully, enter her crate but only after giving us some extremely pathetic looks and putting up a great deal of passive resistance to entering it.

For being outside, you can do a number of things:

- Use a long lead (50') that she can just drag. Go out with her, interact with her, play with her. But, don't leave her out there unattended. A portion of that lead should always being within reach if you're playing with her, and you can grab it easily if she tries to run.
- Fence a portion of the yard. This would be something to consider if you need to leave her outside for longer periods unattended and/or you need to let her out at night and want to keep animals away.
- Electric Fence for some of the yard. Same idea as above, but nothing to look at for you. The downside is that it doesn't keep animals out.
- Use a training collar to train her in the exact same way that electric fence works, except you provide the feedback instead of the wire in the ground.

Generally, you don't want her outside unless she's supervised, and NEVER use a dog run (it's actually dangerous for the dog - they can break their neck, and I've seen it happen to a family member's dog).
What we mean by 'dog run' is a fenced area, similar to a kennel. There would be fence creating a square against the side of the house and encompassing the shed, creating an approximately 2500 sq ft enclosure for her to [hopefully safely] observe the outdoors. We haven't actually started working on this yet. Are you referring to the pulley system? I imagine that if that were attached to a neck collar it would be unsafe, but if it were attached to a body harness it would be more safe, but would still require supervision.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you to everyone for your responses! I greatly appreciate any and all help given.
We may be going through some training with an actual trainer sometime soon, but finances are an issue and at-home training is extremely expensive. We're not sure yet if public training is a viable option.
 

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Thank you to everyone for your responses! I greatly appreciate any and all help given.
We may be going through some training with an actual trainer sometime soon, but finances are an issue and at-home training is extremely expensive. We're not sure yet if public training is a viable option.
If you do training with a trainer, look for someone who does positive reinforcement! If you want to do some work at home, look up Kikopup on Youtube. You can train almost anything if you find a motivator for her. Does she like toys? Does she like a special treat? Try cheese, hot dog, chicken, dried liver, anything dog friendly that can be cut up into teeny tiny pieces. Balls, tugs, flirt poles are good toys to try. Find what she likes and work with her! :)
 
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