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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Or, in plainer words, 'removing the ovaries' vs 'removing the ovaries AND uterus'.

Here are two studies talking about the benefits of this (much less invasive) type of spay (ovariectomy): Study 1 and Study 2.

It sounds like a win-win... less invasive and (I would assume) quicker recovery time for the dog. I've heard arguments against ovariectomy, but those studies seem to show that there is actually not a higher chance of health complications because of it.

Ovariohysterectomy is the most common type of spay in the U.S., but I would hope that knowledge of the alternative could help people make the choice for the other surgery if it was appropriate for their dog.
 

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Problem is, in the States, it's rare and the vets who do ovariectomies charge a LOT, making the procedure cost-prohibitive for the majority of pet owners. I guess in other countries it's the norm. I have no preference one way or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Problem is, in the States, it's rare and the vets who do ovariectomies charge a LOT, making the procedure cost-prohibitive for the majority of pet owners. I guess in other countries it's the norm. I have no preference one way or the other.
Why would it cost more to to a less invasive surgery? Just because it's not done as often? :confused:
 

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Why would it cost more to to a less invasive surgery? Just because it's not done as often? :confused:
I believe because the actual procedure is different, and using laser instead of cutting. Much like laparoscopic surgical procedures for humans being a less invasive, but more expensive procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)

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The only concern I would have about not taking the uterus is for future possible pyometra. I'll have to take a good look at the links you posted when I have a chance to read them...
 

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Very nice Pai, I've already decided that I will have a vasectomy done to Yoshi and now when I get my female I will insure she keeps her ovaries! I live near a large vet college so I shouldn't have issues getting either done. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Yeah, but if she keeps her ovaries won't she still go into heat? And attract males.....it could become a quality-of-life issue. Being hounded (LOL) by males every time she steps outside for 2 months a year (1/6 of her life!) would be a pain.

My mom says that whenever her childhood dogs went into heat, there would be 50 males milling around their house. Nowadays, of course, the leash laws are better and more dogs are neutered, but it's still something to think about. Especially in cities, especially if you have to go to a dog park.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It would require an owner to be familiar with their dogs' cycles, yea. A full spay is the most convenient choice, but I'm sure there are some owners who wouldn't mind the bit of extra work. It would all depend on the person's lifestyle and comfort level about the whole thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bumping this old thread to mention that the AVMA will be presenting a lecture on different methods of spaying at their upcoming annual meeting. For a vet's thoughts on this issue, check out this article.

Shorter surgery time and fewer complications were reported when ONLY the ovaries were removed in dogs (this is the common practice in Europe, when it's done at all). Apparently, there is resistance to changing the 'way it's always been done' in the states, but hopefully the AVMA presentation can get more people thinking about it.
 
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