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I was on another dog forum and got blasted over there because I said some dogs should stay out side.I believe I'm right.Trust me,you don't want coon hounds in your home.Anyway I have a large dog,although she's a puppy right now. She will be a very large dog.A Great Pyreness/Golden Retriever mix.Even though she is house broken,or close to it,she loves it outside and don't want to come back in. I believe it's because she has a very thick coat,it's almost like that of a polar bear.Even inside she stays by the garge door in the kitchen.My wife says that's because it's the coolest place in the house.I might leave her outside in the summer time,except when it rains. Am I wrong for keeping her outside? The back yard is very shaded.
 

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It's not a matter of how physically comfortable they are out there... dogs are social creatures and need to be part of the family. Children love to play outdoors too and often don't want to come back in from playing but that doesn't mean they should live out there!
 

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Well if I had to keep one outside I would have a concrete slab then a 4 ft by 15 ft kennel run 9 gage. I would then roof it for shade. That would at least protect the dog and he would be where I could find him when needed. Of course if I had him outside why would I need him.
 

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My two older dogs (a Lab and a Lab mix) were outside dogs until this winter. They like it outside, but they like being inside with their people even more. We never had any problems with them outside like barking, bordeom digging, aggression, etc., and they are well trained, well groomed, and well cared for. However, now that we have started letting them in we hear about it if they come to the back door and we are quick enough to let them in to their bed! lol And they aren't even "inside" inside dogs...they stay in our back hallway and laundry room. (That being said, we live on ten acres in the country...it has become more populated in recent years, but we used to be surrounded on three sides by fields and on the other side by a wooded area with a creek, miles away from any main roads. The dogs had run of our ten acres and the fields surrounding our house (another ten acre lot, and two fourty acre lots), and would also go swimming in the creek at any opportunity. When we weren't home and at night we would kennel them in a 10'x20' dog run.)

If she was my dog, I'd let her stay out as long as she wants (if she is safely contained, has shelter, water, and a heated source or cool spot, depending on the weather). Bring her in during bad weather or whenever she wants back in, and if she wants out just let her stay out. She'll let you know when she's had enough outside time and wants to be back in with her family.
 

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Thought about bringing her in at night, also if you had a dogy door then she could come and go at will. I am sure she will come in at times especially if you feed her in the house.
 

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My dogs are kind of a hybrid of inside/outside dogs. They spend their days outside while I"m at work. I get home, change and we go for a walk outside. Then they're either inside or outside in the evening depending on whether I'm home or not.
 

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People go a bit overboard with the "Inside dogs only!" thing sometimes, I think. Dogs ARE social animals yes, but that doesn't mean they need (or want, usually) to be with you 24/7. When someone says they have an outdoor dog it immediately conjures up images of some neglected, bored animal...and while this is true in some cases, it is possible to have a well adjusted, trained pet that doesn't live in the house. And yeah, I've meant plenty of dogs that much MUCH prefer to be outside rather then cooped up in the house.

IMO, if you're willing to go outside yourself and provide the stimulation, care, protection, etc. that any indoor animal would get - then I really don't see what the problem is. Dogs are animals...it's not like forcing a child to live outside. They can thrive in that environment just as they can thrive indoors.

Now would I have an outdoor dog? Probably not...but that's a personal choice. I think it's perfectly possible to have an outdoor dog that receives the same love and attention and indoor dog might.

One matter to consider though, is that you really need a secure yard. Really secure. Not just for escapes, but for theft prevention. In some areas it's not uncommon to have pets go missing from yards or kennels.
 

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If a dog has sufficient opportunities to socialize with his humans, staying outdoors is not a problem. "Sufficient" has different meaning for different dogs. A typical Golden retriever is going to be inside at least as much as he is outside. Hounds tend to be a bit more autonomous. If the dog has the company of other dogs, they will do even better. Beyond that, proper housing is the next most important requirement. A place to get out of the cold, a place to get out of the direct sun and rain, a constant supply of fresh water, and proper sanitation are must-have items. The best of both worlds is a roomy kennel/run with a dog door, so the pooch can come in and out at will.
 

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I have no problem with outside dogs at all, as long as they're given daily training, exercise, socialization and "people time"!

My girl Willow is an almost completely outdoor dog - we built her a 16' x 16' kennel on our back deck, that has a full roof with ceiling fan. It opens into our garage and shares one side with the house, so there is one completely closed wall to protect her from the elements. There are also 2 igloo doghouses inside, filled with fresh straw every couple of days. We also have benches built into the deck so it's comfortable for me to sit out there and read in the summer, just hanging out with my dogs.

We came to this decision over several months of "negotiating" to figure out the situation that would be best for her. First of all, we found that Willow absolutely panics whenever she's crated. She will hurt herself trying to escape, or work herself to exhaustion. We've been working on her with this for 6 months, but it's clear she had a previous traumatic experience in a crate - she simply hasn't improved much. Added to this is the fact that although we were told she was good with cats, this is clearly not the case - her prey drive is incredible. So, she can't be given free run of the house unsupervised.

So, to keep her safely contained when she can't be supervised, we built her the kennel. She adores being outside, so I really think this is the best arrangement for her. When we previously tried to set her up in her own "room", she ate through the wall and molding, dug up the entire carpet and pad (and scraped through part of the subfloor) and tore up her paws doing it. The kennel outdoors is the way she obviously prefers it, as she doesn't try to escape or get destructive.

Of course, I spend tons of time with Willow every day - and most days she is actually indoors with me for the majority of the morning and early afternoon - I simply give the cats free run of the upstairs and keep Willow downstairs with me. We also exercise every day in the form of hiking, backpacking, and scootering. While in the kennel, she has plenty of chewtoys, Kongs, etc., and enjoys watching the wildlife all around. We live on the edge of a wildlife refuge and have no nearby neighbors, so it's peaceful and quiet for her.

Having a friend for her also really helps - Bandit keeps her company often during the day when I can't, and they are best buddies. :) Because he's very trustworthy with the cats, and crate trained, he does get more "inside time" than Willow, and sleeps crated inside at night.

So in summary, here are my keys to successful outdoor dog ownership:

1. Daily attention and affection
2. Daily exercise
3. Daily training
4. Canine companionship
5. Secure facility with protection from the elements
6. Strict flea and heartworm prevention regimen

Keep in mind, though, that it also depends on the breed, and your goals for the dog. Traditionally, working sled dogs are kept outdoors, and my goal is to scooter and sled with my two. The acclimation to outdoor temps is crucial for these dogs to be able to run in the cold of winter and the warm weather of summer.
 

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Susie being a Bernese cross gets too hot in the house in the summertime. She was raised inside but when she was around a year old, she made it obvious that she would prefer to sleep outside in her dog house. She lets me know when the winter comes, that she wants to come in and she sleeps indoors. She goes everywhere with me and does Agility so gets lots of attention plus I am usually outdoors most of the time in the summer. I ride my horse a lot from springtime when the snow goes, till fall. Susie goes for miles with me when I am riding. When it is too hot for her to go with me in the Van, she quite happily stays at home outside. She has a fenced in one acre to wander around on, dig holes and be a dog. Most of the big dogs in my area are not only outside dogs but are allowed to roam free everywhere, a lot of them getting hit on the roads, that I do not agree with.
 

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My Aussie loves being outdoors & he gets warm easily too - always likes lying in the coolest spot when indoors.
When I'm at home, he lets me know when he wants out & when he wants back in - he spends most of the time outdoors.
I think if a dog wants to be outdoors, along as he's safe & not being a nuisance to neighbors that might complain or causing any problem, let him be outdoors.
I do have a dog run that's partially coved with plywood & has a dog house in it that I keep him in if I'm gone from home for a few hours, rather than keeping him indoors when the weather's nice.
 

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Dogs ARE social animals yes, but that doesn't mean they need (or want, usually) to be with you 24/7. When someone says they have an outdoor dog it immediately conjures up images of some neglected, bored animal...and while this is true in some cases, it is possible to have a well adjusted, trained pet that doesn't live in the house. And yeah, I've meant plenty of dogs that much MUCH prefer to be outside rather then cooped up in the house.

IMO, if you're willing to go outside yourself and provide the stimulation, care, protection, etc. that any indoor animal would get - then I really don't see what the problem is. Dogs are animals...it's not like forcing a child to live outside.
I know, I was asking for that. ;) Sorry for posting my knee-jerk reaction. I know that many dogs thrive in an outdoor environment (my own LOOOOOVE being outdoors and spend hours playing outside)... the problem I have with a dog who "lives" out there (including sleeping outdoors etc.) is that it's too easy to fall into an "out of sight, out of mind" thing.

When I was growing up, our Lab was an "outdoor dog." I trusted my parents to know what they were doing, and I just grew up thinking large dogs lived outdoors. She NEVER came into the house. She spent every waking minute in our back yard (granted, it was a huge back yard that was properly fenced).

The problem was that on some days she got a lot of good interaction, but most days, it was just too easy to forget about her. When we would come home from school, she would greet us so gleefully as though we were rescuing her from a deserted island. That happy greeting actually made me sad... because it made me feel as though her life was awful all those long hours outside with no interaction. And truth be told, I'm sure it WAS awful. A dog needs plenty of exercise every day, but a dog doesn't need 14+ hours of exercise a day... so why make him stay out there all that time?

When dogs spend time just "hanging out" around humans, they learn so much more than only being exposed to 30 minutes of allotted affection time and 2 hours of walks per day. I'm constantly amazed at my dogs' vocabulary... what they understand... how they pick up on nonverbal communication... etc. It's because they are around us so much of the time. My poor dog growing up didn't have that opportunity. Sure, she could sit, come, heel, etc. But she missed out on being part of the family. And now that I have mostly-indoor dogs, I realize how much WE missed out.

BTW, I'm not referring to a situation where a doggy door is available that leads to a fenced yard or kennel. IMO that's the ideal situation... if the dog wants to stay outside 10 hours one day or only 2, that's the dog's decision and I'm 100% okay with that. But I don't believe a dog can thrive spending 100% of his time outdoors, not unless the humans are spending many hours every day out with the dog.
 

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My oldest dog is an inside outside dog he comes in when he wants but he mostly wants to be outside he has a dog door so he can come and go as he pleases. BUT I have had coon dogs in the house they were no different that having any other dog in the house and these were hunting dogs. And a great pyrenees/Saint Bernard mix inside and they hated being outside. I don't think size should determine whether a dog should be inside or outside.

I think it can work though as long as the dogs is not just thrown outside and left on his own and never walked or trained. I don't like it but it isn't my place to judge people on where they keep their dogs as long as they are cared for.
 

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So in summary, here are my keys to successful outdoor dog ownership:

1. Daily attention and affection
2. Daily exercise
3. Daily training
4. Canine companionship
5. Secure facility with protection from the elements
6. Strict flea and heartworm prevention regimen
Pardon me, but those keys also apply to indoor dog ownership.

1 to 4 are general rules in dog ownership regardless of the dog being an outside/inside kind.
5 does apply to outside dogs
And 6... i would apply 6 even if i had inside dogs because i must walk them sooner or later, during walks they can get fleas or heartworm.
 

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Pardon me, but those keys also apply to indoor dog ownership.
Yeah, but owners of exclusively outdoor dogs are more likely (IME) to forgo those important responsibilites of dog ownership. Out of sight, out of mind.

I do take issue with the OP's assertion that "some dogs SHOULD stay outside". I'm sure lots of people have indoor coonhounds. Coonhounds are not common around here, but the few I do know are housedogs. I don't think breed determines which dogs should come inside.

However, I do think some dogs can be perfectly happy as outdoor dogs, provided they're properly cared for and given enough attention. And thick-coated dogs do get hot in the house in the winters, and prefer to be outside. BUT....she'll really want to be inside in the air conditioning in the summer! Try being outside in that heat with a fur coat on.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
My Aussie loves being outdoors & he gets warm easily too - always likes lying in the coolest spot when indoors.
When I'm at home, he lets me know when he wants out & when he wants back in - he spends most of the time outdoors.
I think if a dog wants to be outdoors, along as he's safe & not being a nuisance to neighbors that might complain or causing any problem, let him be outdoors.
I do have a dog run that's partially coved with plywood & has a dog house in it that I keep him in if I'm gone from home for a few hours, rather than keeping him indoors when the weather's nice.
This is what I'm talking about.There are times when I need to run errands,and can't be there for her.I'm saying I don't plan to keep her outside forever.BUT,if she feels she wants to stay outside,I'll let her.It's what she wants to do.But I also like the compnionship when she's around.
 

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This is what I'm talking about. There are times when I need to run errands, and can't be there for her. I'm saying I don't plan to keep her outside forever. BUT, if she feels she wants to stay outside, I'll let her. It's what she wants to do. But I also like the companionship when she's around.
See, I don't consider a dog that hangs out outside only when he/she wants to to be an "outdoor" dog. My post was referring to people who make their dogs stay outdoors at all times (all day and all night) except if it's a freezing or rainy night. My dogs hang out outside when they feel like it but they are indoor dogs... they eat and sleep in our home and spend most of their time with the family, not locked outside. It sounds like you're describing what I would consider indoor dogs too.
 

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Of course it is ok for them. Being inside is ok for them after all. I have some outdoor dogs myself. If a flock guardian was kept indoors then they couldn't be keeping the flock safe simultaneously.
 

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My Uncle had a large lab mix when I was younger, that was an outdoor dog - he simply was never allowed in the house. They had a doggy door in the garage where he had a bed & was fed & it opened into a large chain link fenced back yard where they also kept a dog house for him.
He was a very loved & very well cared for dog - a great dog. He did get a lot of attention & went hunting & on a lot of family outings.
 
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