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I have a 4 months cow dog / bird dog mix. She is overly excited and gets totally out of control. We got her at 6 weeks and started leaving her alone from the start to avoid separation anxiety. However, when ever we leave the house or momma comes home or she sees my son in law, she totally loses it and she starts in with this loud, high pitched whine. Momma has to go into the closed bedroom to get dressed and put on her shoes, or the dog keeps climbing on her. When she, or me, leaves the house, she attacks the door and lets out with that high pitched whine. She does quickly quiet after we leave. Last night my son in law came over and she set in. We placed her in her crate and eventually had to cover it with a sheet. Smokey then quieted down. She just gets out of control and is almost impossible to calm her down. Momma can do it somewhat, but she starts in almost before you can praise her for being quiet. They took her for an hour walk, came home and she started in again. She is not happy until she is climbing over Momma or Tony.
 

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She needs more stimulation through training and through training she needs to understand boundaries. All dogs need training and this one does as well. You have two high energy breeds and insufficient mental activity. As you note, an hour walk did not even nick the surface of her energy level.

When you are there, she needs a job.. and before she can have a job she needs training such as sit, down, go to mat or bed and so forth. Boundaries are sitting and waiting to come out of the crate (even when you have the door open) sitting and waiting to go out doors on a walk or to pee/poop, going to her bed or mat when told, sitting or lying down and waiting before eating. In fact, this dog would not eat from a bowel.. she would have to do something to earn every piece of food she gets.

Jumping all over you is a boundary issue. When a dog jumps, most people back up which invites jumping. Instead, step into her space and then give her something to do (like sit or down). When she gets something correct be sure to have a party and make it the best thing ever.

You need to mark the correct behaviors and reward them. I use YES to mark a correct behavior and then I give a piece of food. The object is to show the dog what you want and to make them want to do it.

I suggest you google Karen Pryor and see what she has to offer in the area of clicker training (she uses a clicker to mark correct behavior instead of YES). Once you understand that, I would look at 101 things to do with a box.. as the games there are mentally stimulating and mental work will tire a dog out.
 

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As above, this dog needs a job, cow/bird dog, I assume some sort of herding breed/hunting dog mix, sooooooo if she's a good one she's going to need you to keep her busy. Make training fun for both of you and you will both enjoy doing it and it becomes the highlight of the day. Once she understands that, saying sit, she'll slam her butt to the floor & look at you with expectation, then reward. She will likely enjoy structured games. Structured means you are in control, not a free for all. So you play tug, but she will sit for permission to play tug. There is so much out there on youtube (some truly awful stuff but also some pure gold).
If she's what she looks like, then training should be a combination of action and control. Sit, wait, tug (or chase a tossed treat). Down stay then you call her and she comes at you like rocket. Control in that she gets to you and doesn't knock you down, something called a flip finish is fun for dogs.
Training can't be expressed or explained or described in a few paragraphs, but yep, training, make sure it's fun. People argue about how to train all the time, but if it's fun for both of you, and she's not making life un-fun for others, you are on the right track. If you can't afford a trainer, there are free resources out there but you'll need to do your own research and make your own decisions, and there is some truly awful people giving advice and also some saints giving you pure gold. Navigating that is an adventure in itself.
Your dog will likely also enjoy controlled fetch games, not just tossing the ball, but working some obedience for the glorious event of a tossed ball. Again, that's a long road, but if it's fun, you'll both enjoy the journey.
 

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At four months old this behavior is not at all surprising. He's a mix of a cow dog and a bird dog, both of which can be highly excitable and incredibly vocal.

My dog is an Aussie/Collie mix (excitable and vocal), and he often jumped all over us, whined, barked, and made all sorts of noises when we would come home after a few hours away. The dog is overexcited and wants your attention. She cannot control her emotions, especially at this age.

So, ignore the dog. The dog gets ZERO attention until she is quiet. I crossed my arms and kept turning away from my dog until all of his paws were on the floor and he was quiet. Only then did I offer attention. He would usually get excited again when I was going to give attention and try to jump up, so I turned away again and waited for calm. This has to be consistent over quite a long period of time, usually a few months. It will most certainly get better, but as young dogs do, they will have brain farts or new people will make them excited again, so they'll need a reminder.

The dog will eventually learn that she gets no attention until she behaves politely. She can still be excited, but jumping up and being out of control is not acceptable.

I would also suggest that she goes in the crate when you leave. This will keep her from attacking the door when you leave, and from mobbing you when you return. It is perfectly fine to use the crate as a tool to manage your dog when you can't supervise or simply need a moment!
 
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