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Discussion Starter #1

This is MONSTER, our 10 month (in picture) Boz Shepherd Pup. Cant tell you how great of a dog he is. Sweet, loving, intelligent, but will protect us from any threat.


Geisha, our new import Boz Shepherd. 18 month old female, and hopefully girlfriend of Monster.
Power and Presence do not come close to describing her. I am going to experiment with weight pulling,,, as opposed to us.

Three Boz in a first introduction Tail Sniff Off!!! Was a tense moment.
 

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Holy huge.. what do they weigh?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Geisha is 145-150 pounds. Monster is 125 pounds, but will grow and fill out much.

As a Breed, 150-250#, 31-38 inches for males, 100-160#, 29-33 inches for females.

Some get up to 39-41 inches tall.

My plans are to keep a good balance of height and weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
The Large Livestock Guardian dogs do not fill out until close to or after 2 years. In fact, it would be unhealthy to try to push them to do so. They put all of their energy into growing their structure at first. Pushing to much nutrition on them could increase incidence of bone or joint issues.

This is a mature male Boz Shepherd. 38.5 inches and 254 pounds.

Another Male, 33.5 inches 180#

You can see that although they fill out, they still maintain a WORKING WEIGHT. They have been bred for thousands of years to travel many hundreds of miles a year, run as fast as a wolf, and be able to fight most predators. These are far from the PETS that most of or dogs of today have become.
 

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Some dogs are just finicky. Delilah doesnt eat much either. She's a husky, but if it's human food she is all over it.
 

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Giant breeds are best grown lean. Allowing for extra weight puts added stress on their growing bones and joints. Add in that they're at a lanky, teen stage...you're gonna see more rib than most like.

Beautiful dogs! Please keep posting pictures, I'd love to see Monster when he's mature.
 

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wow. just wow.

I am sure you get a lot of "wheres the saddle" jokes and "holy WTF! IS THAT!" anyways, you would around my neighborhood.

I love them. Please tell me more and keep posting pictures!
 

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Yeah they are in fine weight for dogs their age and build. And seriously if you think that is too skinny, go take a look at true desert sighthounds.

Gorgeous dogs btw.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Wow, thanks for the interest!
The Boz Shepherds are a Landrace Regional Breed from the Northern stretches of the Urfa Mountains in South East Turkey,,,,that was a mouthfull!!!
Were bred as a Livestock Guardian, but also used as a Family and Village Guardian. The main difference between the Boz (and other Livestock Guardians) and most other Guarding or Protection breeds, is that their PREY DRIVE has been bred down. With this comes a reduced risk with small pets, children or family. A dog that is Submissive to their family, including the children. No need to "Maintain Dominance" over the dog as in many stronger temperment breeds.

As far as the RIBS, as all of the LGD breeds from Turkey, they carry some genetics from the sighthound. (One reason they have such a low incidence of hip issues). They can be fully muscled, fit, healthy, and still show some rib. Where My Kangals tend to stay well fleshed on the same diet, the Boz stay lean. Could be the historic emphasis on physical ability. The dogs accompany the shepherd with the flock for 200-600 miles every year through the mountains. Constantly exposed to the environmental extremes, poor nutrition, demanding work.

And yes, we get all the "How much does he eat, got a saddle, what is that, Great Dane or Mastiff Cross" We take the pups to our childrens ball games, and at time it gets hard to watch the game.

Two more examples of the Boz Shepherd. At a working or conditioned weight.

This is a Azawakh, from South Saharah. Is a sighthound used as a Livestock guardian. Although looking at near death, this dog is in a average condition for the breed in its native lands. Talk about ribs!!
 

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wow. just wow.

I am sure you get a lot of "wheres the saddle" jokes and "holy WTF! IS THAT!" anyways, you would around my neighborhood.

I love them. Please tell me more and keep posting pictures!
This!!!
Exactly what I was thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Everyone!

I admired these dogs on the internet for years. Thinking they were Kangals all the time. Wasn't until 6 years later that I finally found someone with the connections to (GET) some out of Turkey. As it is illegal to take them out of the country. So after a leap of faith and risk of wireing money overseas to someone I have never spoken with, I have my DREAM dogs.

Can see many more pictures at monstermalak.com.
Hope you enjoy them.
 

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I think you've given me a new breed to fall in love with.
I LOVE mastiff/molasser (I know there's a distinction but bear with me :D) breeds that aren't too squash-nosed or bulky looking. Your dogs are absolutely GORGEOUS.
Though the one with the red tasseled collar looks a bit scar-faced!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The three grown Boz Shepherds on the one post are over in Turkey. The white dog, Duman, is a hardworking Shepherd dog. He usually wears a iron collar with 4 inch spikes to help him with the fights with wolves. The fights with wolves are the reason for many of the scars.

The Boz Shepherds are hard working dogs in an environment where the weak are disposed of. Although it has its elements of cruelty, in a harsh environment full of poverty, the people have little choice. Effective dogs are elemental to their survival.

This harsh reality has created a tough dog, with unique abilities and qualities.
My kind of dog!
 
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