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Discussion Starter #1
What are your opinions on bike springers?

I've personally never used one, though I like the idea, I'm far too nervous to.
 

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I have one, but have yet to attach it to my bike. I plan to in the future though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You should post a thread on it when you do.
When my dog gets bigger I'd like to get one, I'm just a nervous ninny and I'm afraid of it breaking and my dog running off, or the bike tipping over from the pull (I'm a rather small person), or his tail or something getting caught in the chain if he gets to close, or any array of things that COULD go wrong. ><
 

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I had one a long time ago, with my first dog (a Lab). It worked well with her, although it does take a bit of training. The springy part absorbs the shock so the dog can't pull you over so easily. But it's best to have a bike that's adjusted so you can put both feet on the ground quickly if you have to. And the dog learns to lean away from the bike so there shouldn't be any tail/chain mishaps.I recommend using a harness so they don't learn to pull on their collars, and to reduce neck pressure. You should probably have a decent recall on your dog before you attempt this, in case he does get loose. But you could also have a regular leash (kept slack but not slack enough to catch on anything) on him for emergencies.

Unfortunately, when I got rid of my bike I forgot to take the connector thingie off, so I still have the springy part but no connector. I keep meaning to order a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I had one a long time ago, with my first dog (a Lab). It worked well with her, although it does take a bit of training. The springy part absorbs the shock so the dog can't pull you over so easily. But it's best to have a bike that's adjusted so you can put both feet on the ground quickly if you have to. And the dog learns to lean away from the bike so there shouldn't be any tail/chain mishaps.I recommend using a harness so they don't learn to pull on their collars, and to reduce neck pressure. You should probably have a decent recall on your dog before you attempt this, in case he does get loose. But you could also have a regular leash (kept slack but not slack enough to catch on anything) on him for emergencies.

Unfortunately, when I got rid of my bike I forgot to take the connector thingie off, so I still have the springy part but no connector. I keep meaning to order a new one.
That's what I saw some people doing (using a secondary leash). If I ever use one I think I'll order a sledding harness since they have the side D-rings so it doesn't pull the harness all wonky, either. I hadn't thought to lower the seat so my feet would touch the ground faster, though. That's a good idea. Lol.
 

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I have never bothered with a springer. My dog stays on the left side of my bike and the leash is in my left hand so I can brake with my right. Hundreds of miles later, I still don't feel a springer is necessary.

Since you're getting a husky, why not try out bikejoring, canicross, etc? There's already info floating around on DF from members that do it. I've started it with my dog. IMO, it's better than a normal bike ride. She has to use her brain(exhausting!), run, and pull my weight.
 
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