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So I'm going to try and make this quick:
My family has a beagle (male, about 7-8)
We moved last year and are still in the process of setting up the house. We recently got a new couch for our living room and are soon going to begin to build the room as a central/guest area esp. since thanksgiving is coming up soon.
Here's the problem: Our beagle keeps trying to sleep on it. He has a skin condition. We checked with the vet. it's no more than an oily coat but it leaves quite the smell when left un checked. We are not able to bathe him often enough to remove the smell, since it comes back very quickly and it's really a toss up between wet dog and general smell. It is also connected with some sort of glands, the vet didn't really give us a lot of info, but we know that at times he REALLY leaves a bad smell wherever he goes. He doesn't seem to mind it and the vet says that it is not detrimental (to him).

The dog goes to doggy daycare twice a week. The lady who runs is very nice, but she lets him on her couch. We have dealt with our beagle (named Frisbee) trying to sleep on other pieces of furniture, and have usually been able to teach him not to go on them. Our last resort is to simply cover up the furniture, and then pile up misc. items on the furniture to prevent him from being able to climb up.
This doesn't seem to have really worked with this new couch. We kick him off and try several small methods that a trainer taught us to try and train him, but the next day he's back on it. We all are gone during most of the day, but he gets put in a crate for the first half before my dad comes home and lets him out and walks him. Usually when I get home from school (4 pm ish) I find him back on the couch. We have resorted to piling objects on top of it, but he usually just pushes them aside and tries to hide among them on the couch. We put more on, and now he has gravitated to the top portion of the couch.

At this point it's hard to imagine that he DOESN'T realize that he's not supposed to be there, but the dog mind is a mystery to me. Just today I caught him when I came home and pushed him off doing the usual "No. Bad dog." routine. (I know it's probably not a very effective method but after about a month or so you would think that he gets it) Not an hour later I go in to turn the heat up and he's back at it on top of the couch!

One issue in our family is that the dog had bonded strongly with my mom, but she does not want to take the hardline "NO" attitude. Preferring the "let's try and lure him down with a treat" method. And when she scolds him she does it in a more upbeat/happy voice, which I have read is not that good. "aw who's a bad doggy? you're a bad doggy! yes you are!" in a happy voice doesn't seem to be getting her anywhere. Whereas my dad and my "NO! BAD DOG! GET OFF!" doesn't seem to be getting anywhere either.

I realize now that this is very long and would like to thank anyone who takes the time to read it and give any advice. I can try and answer any questions that people have about our situation.

I know that we are doing something wrong, and would really just like some advice from people who might have had similar problems.

Thanks!
 

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First, have you taught the "off" command? If you are saying "No, bad dog" and just pushing him off, you aren't really teaching him a command. I recommend teaching the off command.

Second, getting on the couch is a "self-rewarding behavior," meaning that it's a reward to cuddle on the couch, it's cozy and he likes it. Dogs like to be rewarded. He is rewarding himself, because he likes getting up there. So, even though you push him off every time you catch him, it seems worth it to him because he likes the result of being on the couch.

Also, it's super hard to teach him not to get on the couch when you aren't there to redirect or remind him. When you see him there and tell him he's bad and push him off, he may make a connection, but it's probably not the connection you think. So, you think, I push him off every time, he must know he isn't supposed to be up there. But, HE'S not necessarily thinking.
 

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Does he have his own comfy place to sleep on?

I do think that dogs do know the difference between one furniture and another. We let our boy sleep on the bed but he can't go on the couch. Every time he goes on the couch, I'd lead him out if he doesn't get out with the "out" command. I don't need to redirect him, but then he is fine with finding somewhere else to lay down anyways (like the carpet). He actually understood the message since the very beginning, as we never really had to do much to reinforce the rule.

Maybe you can get him a comfy bed near the sofa, and then every time he tries to go to sofa, you redirect him to there. Maybe he is cold and so he liked the sofa?
Also, you might consider restricting the access to the sofa when you're not around.
 

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A few suggestions:

1. Block access to the couch when there is no one around to supervise the dog. This could be accomplished by crating, closing door to the room if possible, turning the couch around so the back of it faces the room, put a piece of plywood in front of the couch or some other way.

2. Teach "off". Use a food lure to get the dog off the couch. Let the dog back up. Use the lure again. Repeat until the dog understands the game. Now pretend to have the treat in your hand and lure with your hand. Give a treat after the dog has got off the couch. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Now add a cue. Say "off", lure with your hand, then give a treat. Repeat some more. When he has learned "off" don't ask him to go on the couch again.

3. Provide the dog with a super comfy place of his own next to the couch. A big plushy doggy bed should do. Make it the best place in the world. Feed tons of treats for being there. Lie there and cuddle with the dog (if the dog likes cuddling that is). Lure the dog there with treats, then fading to a hand signal, then add the cue "go to mat" as described in step 2.

4. If you made it this far, the dog should understand both "off" and "go to mat". You can now move him from one spot to another easily. Unsupervised, he will probably still go on the couch. Over time, if the mat is really reinforcing to the dog, I think that it can be his first choice of place to lie down.

Good luck!
 

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3. Provide the dog with a super comfy place of his own next to the couch. A big plushy doggy bed should do. Make it the best place in the world. Feed tons of treats for being there. Lie there and cuddle with the dog (if the dog likes cuddling that is). Lure the dog there with treats, then fading to a hand signal, then add the cue "go to mat" as described in step 2.
Quoting for emphasis.

Beagles love to burrow. They also love soft, cushy places to sleep, and they like being near their people. The couch accomplishes all of this. I've never successfully taught a dog to stay off the couch when I'm not there, but I only wanted Muggsy off the couch because the couch wasn't big enough for him and more than 1 other person, so it wasn't important to me.

So, you have two ways to go with this. Really, really work on training (not yelling no, that doesn't work) and get him his own bed and make that bed awesome, or buy something to put on the couch to keep his stink off of it when you aren't there to supervise. Either one works. Get him his own bed either way, though, if you're not going to allow him on the couch when you're there. Dogs deserve a cushy spot just as much as we do.

As to the smell, I'd get a second opinion from a vet and see if a groomer could help you out. It's obviously affecting him in that he's now being kicked off his favorite spot, so I'd say pursue treatment so it doesn't affect him.
 
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