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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 7 month old puppy who suddenly lost food interest, he use to run and jump for the bowl now he’s all causal, sometimes not eating it all. Been to the vet, no issues coming up, he was been wormed in case it was that. He’s an Alaskan malamute so he eats a lot in a day. I have tried food toys and hand feeding him this does work but as I said it’s a lot of food so there is only so much I can get in toys and use for training. I checked the food and it’s new, in date so I’m not sure what’s happening. I changed his bowl, I tried the firm method of putting it down for 10-15 minutes and taking it away again then nothing to the next meal but that didn’t do all that much and it’s been a couple of weeks now of messing around. Any advice welcome, of if anyone has good supplements I could add in? I don’t want to go to crazy with this but he likes carrots so I tried that for example. Thanks!
 

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It could be because his adult teeth are setting, and his mouth is a bit tender. Also, if he's not neutered, his hormones are starting to kick in. Try soaking the kibble in water until it is softened a bit, and do the "set it down, walk away, and pick up any leftovers after 15 minutes" thing. This is a good article on it. Teaching Your Dog to Eat | Mind to Mind
 
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I had a dog that refused food about this age. The issue was the food. Something in it made my dog a bit sick.

I suggest you try a different food. I do not know what you are feeding, but at this point you need to dog to eat and to like it. I would get a small bag of something from the supermarket.. like Purina Dog Chow (oh yes.. I know it is not a great food) and just see if he will scarf that down. You may also be able to get sample bags of different foods to see if he is crazy about any of those (some pet product stores carry these).

I mostly feed a raw diet but my older dog started to back up on her raw food in the morning so I feed Tractor Supply 4 Health kibble in the AM to her. She gets raw at night and is doing well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks so much, okay I will give that a go. I had to change his food when he was much younger because it seemed to make him sick and then he was on special food for a little while but the other day he managed to eat some of my friends dog food and he ate it quickly and suddenly I thought maybe he wants something else? He normally eats everything so it’s very weird that suddenly he’s like I can take it or leave it. I have been thinking I would look into raw as he has had different problems with dry kibble since a young age.

I had a dog that refused food about this age. The issue was the food. Something in it made my dog a bit sick.

I suggest you try a different food. I do not know what you are feeding, but at this point you need to dog to eat and to like it. I would get a small bag of something from the supermarket.. like Purina Dog Chow (oh yes.. I know it is not a great food) and just see if he will scarf that down. You may also be able to get sample bags of different foods to see if he is crazy about any of those (some pet product stores carry these).

I mostly feed a raw diet but my older dog started to back up on her raw food in the morning so I feed Tractor Supply 4 Health kibble in the AM to her. She gets raw at night and is doing well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thank you I will take a look at this! He’s not neutered. We live in Norway and it’s not so easy to have dogs neutered. I think his adult teeth are mostly in but will give this a go! Thank you


It could be because his adult teeth are setting, and his mouth is a bit tender. Also, if he's not neutered, his hormones are starting to kick in. Try soaking the kibble in water until it is softened a bit, and do the "set it down, walk away, and pick up any leftovers after 15 minutes" thing. This is a good article on it. Teaching Your Dog to Eat | Mind to Mind
 

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7 months is still to young to think about neuturing. In places like norway, where its not the popular choice to alter your dog, there is actually less of a overpopulation issue :p .. isn't that interesting?

I'd switch the food, maybe add some food mixers into the mix. I'd also start joint supplement with such a large breed dog!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It’s very interesting I think! I’m from Ireland but live here in Norway and my brain is set to oh neuter because that’s what you are meant to do or are told to do but I actually think there is laws around it here in Norway! I think I wouldn’t neuter him yet anyway he’s too young but I may not neuter him at all, he’s a gorgeous boy with great Temperament so he could make some lovely puppies but that’s in a few years! We will try survive this puppy stage first haha

thank you for the tips!

7 months is still to young to think about neuturing. In places like norway, where its not the popular choice to alter your dog, there is actually less of a overpopulation issue :p .. isn't that interesting?

I'd switch the food, maybe add some food mixers into the mix. I'd also start joint supplement with such a large breed dog!
 

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Honestly it's more like a strong culture of spay/neuter being the norm happens more in areas with overpopulation problems, rather than the lack of a routine spay/neuter culture reduces overpopulation. As an American living in Norway, there's a lot of other cultural differences around dog husbandry and ownership that have a bigger effect on the lack of overpopulation than just spay/neutering being largely "only when medically necessary" here. It definitely proves that the reproductive status of domestic animals isn't the only or even main cause of overpopulation, however.

@RachelkimB have you tried softening his food with some warm water? This both makes it easier to eat if his gums/teeth are bothering him and make it a little more appetizing (ie stinky) for dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Very interesting to hear your thoughts. Thank you for the tip, I have tried warm water, it’s so hard to figure what his problem is with the food he once ate happily but he’s definitely not sick at least. I added some chicken in last night and he ate it then but I don’t want to go down that road really I would rather find food he eats and just eats it. Maybe I will look into raw food. It takes a bit of time I think to decide and research what’s the best options.
QUOTE="DaySleepers, post: 5301298, member: 39708"]
Honestly it's more like a strong culture of spay/neuter being the norm happens more in areas with overpopulation problems, rather than the lack of a routine spay/neuter culture reduces overpopulation. As an American living in Norway, there's a lot of other cultural differences around dog husbandry and ownership that have a bigger effect on the lack of overpopulation than just spay/neutering being largely "only when medically necessary" here. It definitely proves that the reproductive status of domestic animals isn't the only or even main cause of overpopulation, however.

@RachelkimB have you tried softening his food with some warm water? This both makes it easier to eat if his gums/teeth are bothering him and make it a little more appetizing (ie stinky) for dogs.
[/QUOTE]
 

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Yeah, at that point it might just be worth it to try a different food and see how he takes to it. My older dog did go off his food when he was a few months old and we just wound up never feeding that brand again and it was fine. I'd try that before doing a bunch of mix-ins personally, but different things wind up working for different dogs.

I've had good luck with Vom and Mush grinds. They tend to be a little too bony for my older dog and give him hard poos (he's prone to constipation), so he gets primarily kibble with some on the side, but my younger dog does really well on them and I use them as his primary diet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
yes agreed, adding in just seems to lead to more work. I will see what small bags of food I can get and give it a try. Thanks for your help.

QUOTE="DaySleepers, post: 5301304, member: 39708"]
Yeah, at that point it might just be worth it to try a different food and see how he takes to it. My older dog did go off his food when he was a few months old and we just wound up never feeding that brand again and it was fine. I'd try that before doing a bunch of mix-ins personally, but different things wind up working for different dogs.

I've had good luck with Vom and Mush grinds. They tend to be a little too bony for my older dog and give him hard poos (he's prone to constipation), so he gets primarily kibble with some on the side, but my younger dog does really well on them and I use them as his primary diet.
[/QUOTE]
 

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We pay a little more for the Easy Packs and the bags of little meatballs so we can just feed a few meatballs for their breakfast (smaller meal) and then the younger dog just gets a whole portion (~250g) from the Easy Pack for his dinner. Did the thing where we cut and portioned the rolls for a while and decided that the pre-portioned options were worth the convenience. Of course my boys are both small, nothing like feeding a malamute, so you'll probably want to buy the big blocks to make it economical. Still beats doing a homemade raw diet in terms of time, labor, and mental energy (just driving around to different stores to buy meats on sale and find a good variety of organs and raw meaty bones is a big commitment - been there, done that, happier sticking to the premade options for the time being), but a lot more of a pain than kibble.
 
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