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so i have a malamute mix, she just turned 2 on the 16th. for the past month or two every time i accidently leave my bedroom door open and my roommates let her out of the cage she goes into my room and chews my $400 down blanket and duvet. it is getting out of hand, i hate coming home to a room full of feathers. she has raw bones cooked bones big, small, and flavored raw hides, and her toys on the ground always yet she chooses to go eat my blanket. usually when i yell at her good she feels pretty bad and learns her lesson but she wont stop doing this, and a couple of times i have lost my temper and got a little rough (never hitting though). what can i do besides the obvious thing and shut my door? i dont wanna spray with no chew spray as i have to sleep with it.

oh and i do take her out for atleast 30 min 5 days a week now, which seems enough for the day as she runs in DEEP snow and always passes out for the day after the work out
 

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Maybe this is a stupid question but...is she only outside for a total of 30 mins a day (including potty breaks) or she is exercised for 30 min (not including potty breaks)?
 

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well usually she is out exercised for 1 hour, but at the least its 30 min, and potty breaks would add on to another 20 min or so. i live in an apartment so i have to take her out, cant just let her out into the yard.
 

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so i have a malamute mix, she just turned 2 on the 16th. for the past month or two every time i accidently leave my bedroom door open and my roommates let her out of the cage she goes into my room and chews my $400 down blanket and duvet. it is getting out of hand, i hate coming home to a room full of feathers. she has raw bones cooked bones big, small, and flavored raw hides, and her toys on the ground always yet she chooses to go eat my blanket. usually when i yell at her good she feels pretty bad and learns her lesson but she wont stop doing this, and a couple of times i have lost my temper and got a little rough (never hitting though). what can i do besides the obvious thing and shut my door? i dont wanna spray with no chew spray as i have to sleep with it.

oh and i do take her out for atleast 30 min 5 days a week now, which seems enough for the day as she runs in DEEP snow and always passes out for the day after the work out
NEVER feed cooked bones. Cooked bones splinter and can wreak havoc on a dog's throat and intestines. Also, I highly suggest exercising her more. Malamutes are northern dogs that require a lot of exercise, like at least an hour or two every day. Without her exercise requirements being met, she could become destructive, anxious, and have just too much excess energy.

If she won't stop doing this, then clearly she didn't "learn" her lesson. All you did was make her feel bad from getting yelled at. Yelling does nothing for a dog but make them scared of you. They will also just try to hide their behavior instead of stopping it. Always use positive reinforcement. I think the best thing to do for now is just get her some more exercise. Potty breaks do not count as exercise, and neither does just walking or hanging out in the yard. They need to run and work their muscles. There are a lot of malamute and northern breed owners on here that could help you out.
 

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If she won't stop doing this, then clearly she didn't "learn" her lesson. All you did was make her feel bad from getting yelled at. Yelling does nothing for a dog but make them scared of you. They will also just try to hide their behavior instead of stopping it. Always use positive reinforcement. I think the best thing to do for now is just get her some more exercise. Potty breaks do not count as exercise, and neither does just walking or hanging out in the yard. They need to run and work their muscles. There are a lot of malamute and northern breed owners on here that could help you out.
I second this!
I also, wanted to add that maybe she's just bored. When my dog is bored and wants attention or wants to go for a walk he picks up things that he knows he shouldn't have. It actually works for him immediately because I as soon as I try to get the sock (or hat, shoe, etc.) from him he takes off and we end up running back and forth through the house. He never chews on it though, just holds it in his mouth. It's just his way of letting me know it's play time! I understand not being able to just let them out. It sounds like she already knows she's not supposed to do it - that's why she does it when you're not home. And unless you catch her in the act you can't dish out too much discipline the matter. Maybe get her some toys that keep her busy and engage her mind that you can give her when you're not home. I really think if you step up the exercise and get some toys that will keep her busy it will help immensely.
 

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usually when i yell at her good she feels pretty bad and learns her lesson but she wont stop doing this,
Yelling at her doesn't teach her anything other than to be afraid of you. And since she does it again and again, why would you think she's learned her lesson?

and a couple of times i have lost my temper and got a little rough (never hitting though).
Then what is it that you do to her when you lose your temper?


what can i do besides the obvious thing and shut my door?
oh and i do take her out for at least 30 min 5 days a week now, which seems enough for the day as she runs in DEEP snow and always passes out for the day after the work out
Keep your door shut. Take her out MULTIPLE TIMES A DAY, EVERY DAY - that means 7 days a week. Spend time playing with her in and out of the house - this is separate from walking her. Buy her some brain games. A bored dog is a destructive dog.
 

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I second this!
I also, wanted to add that maybe she's just bored. When my dog is bored and wants attention or wants to go for a walk he picks up things that he knows he shouldn't have. It actually works for him immediately because I as soon as I try to get the sock (or hat, shoe, etc.) from him he takes off and we end up running back and forth through the house. He never chews on it though, just holds it in his mouth. It's just his way of letting me know it's play time! I understand not being able to just let them out. It sounds like she already knows she's not supposed to do it - that's why she does it when you're not home. And unless you catch her in the act you can't dish out too much discipline the matter. Maybe get her some toys that keep her busy and engage her mind that you can give her when you're not home. I really think if you step up the exercise and get some toys that will keep her busy it will help immensely.
this is what i feel shes doing. when i didnt have a cage for her and she was under 1 yr. i would video tape her to see what shed do during the day. well it looked like shed just get bored and pull at something then go "ooo that was kind of fun" and do it again. and when im home she always gets her stuff animals and shoves them in my face till i play with her. as far as toys to keep her busy i usually give her a kong ball full of frozen penut butter or yogurt when i put her in the cage but im not rich and i just got an injury preventing me from doing most my job so im going to be poor for a while, i cant afford all those games and such for her.
its winter for me so on my days off i can always take her out, specially now that im injured i can take her on hikes with me instead of going to the mountain, but when im at work i work from before sun up to after sun down, thus me being gone for a long time and my roommates let her out of the cage, one of them is injured and cannot work at all so shes out all day with him and this is when the problems happen. during the summer though i go fishing every day for about 2 hours so she gets tons of exercise and i never have problems.
 

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this is what i feel shes doing. when i didnt have a cage for her and she was under 1 yr. i would video tape her to see what shed do during the day. well it looked like shed just get bored and pull at something then go "ooo that was kind of fun" and do it again. and when im home she always gets her stuff animals and shoves them in my face till i play with her. as far as toys to keep her busy i usually give her a kong ball full of frozen penut butter or yogurt when i put her in the cage but im not rich and i just got an injury preventing me from doing most my job so im going to be poor for a while, i cant afford all those games and such for her.
its winter for me so on my days off i can always take her out, specially now that im injured i can take her on hikes with me instead of going to the mountain, but when im at work i work from before sun up to after sun down, thus me being gone for a long time and my roommates let her out of the cage, one of them is injured and cannot work at all so shes out all day with him and this is when the problems happen. during the summer though i go fishing every day for about 2 hours so she gets tons of exercise and i never have problems.
This sort of confuses me, if you are fishing, then how is she getting her exercise?
 

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Cooked bones splinter and can wreak havoc on a dog's throat and intestines. Also, I highly suggest exercising her more. Malamutes are northern dogs that require a lot of exercise, like at least an hour or two every day.
This is the second time you have copy and pasted what I wrote… why?
 

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its winter for me so on my days off i can always take her out, specially now that im injured i can take her on hikes with me instead of going to the mountain, but when im at work i work from before sun up to after sun down, thus me being gone for a long time and my roommates let her out of the cage, one of them is injured and cannot work at all so shes out all day with him and this is when the problems happen. during the summer though i go fishing every day for about 2 hours so she gets tons of exercise and i never have problems.
Oook. Couple of things. If you are gone at work for that long the roommate should be letting her out. She should not have to stay in the crate all day long. I understand not being able to afford certain things. We all run into financial trouble at some point in life. The only suggestion I have left for you is to keep your door shut until you have the time and resources to better address the issue.
 

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this is what i feel shes doing. when i didnt have a cage for her and she was under 1 yr. i would video tape her to see what shed do during the day. well it looked like shed just get bored and pull at something then go "ooo that was kind of fun" and do it again. and when im home she always gets her stuff animals and shoves them in my face till i play with her. as far as toys to keep her busy i usually give her a kong ball full of frozen penut butter or yogurt when i put her in the cage but im not rich and i just got an injury preventing me from doing most my job so im going to be poor for a while, i cant afford all those games and such for her.
its winter for me so on my days off i can always take her out, specially now that im injured i can take her on hikes with me instead of going to the mountain, but when im at work i work from before sun up to after sun down, thus me being gone for a long time and my roommates let her out of the cage, one of them is injured and cannot work at all so shes out all day with him and this is when the problems happen. during the summer though i go fishing every day for about 2 hours so she gets tons of exercise and i never have problems.
Well, there you go. When your dog isn't getting exercised, she's got too much energy, she's bored and she gets into things. That's totally normal, and not her fault. The only person who can fix this is you, by exercising her more. 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week isn't nearly enough exercise for a northern breed. My low energy dog gets over an hour a day of exercise.

Also, yelling at a dog after the fact does absolutely nothing. She has no idea what you're yelling at her for, all she learns is that when you come home and look in your bedroom, you get mad. From her perspective, bedrooms make you mad.

And, a dog has no idea what a duvet cover costs. A $400 duvet cover is exactly the same as a sock to her.
 

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A recurring theme that I see over and over again on this site is "If your dog is chewing, he's bored. Get him more exercise."

If I've read that once, I've read it a hundred times. And this advice always strikes me as being #1 over-simplistic, and #2 not entirely logical. The implication is that unless your dog is worn out, they'll get bored, and if they're bored, they'll chew. And that's not right.

I very rarely have chewing issues with either of my dogs, one of which is a malamute. And both of them get only "modest" amounts of exercise. So why don't they chew? They aren't worn out. By this board's definition, they must therefore be bored. But yet they still focus their chewing efforts on their toys and rawhides. So there has to be something else in play here. The equation has got to be more complex than "not enough exercise = chewing".

The Humane Society says this about chewing:

"Adult dogs may engage in destructive chewing for any number of reasons. In order to deal with the behavior, you must first determine why your dog is chewing—and remember, he's not doing it to spite you. Possible reasons for destructive chewing include:

As a puppy, he wasn't taught what to chew and what not to chew.
He's bored.
He suffers from separation anxiety.
His behavior is fear-related.
He wants attention."

Source = http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/destructive_chewing.html

Yes, boredom is on the list. But notice all of the other potential causes of chewing listed. More exercise is not always the answer.
 

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upfromtheashes: The OP admits the dog's only getting 30 minutes of exercise 5 times a week. I'd say that lack of exercise is definitely the problem here.
 

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I think the best thing to do for now is just get her some more exercise. Potty breaks do not count as exercise, and neither does just walking or hanging out in the yard. They need to run and work their muscles.


I think the best thing to do for now is just get her some more exercise. Potty breaks do not count as exercise, and neither does just walking or hanging out in the yard. They need to run and work their muscles.
Please don't just copy and paste what I have already said. You already did this to three other people as well.
 

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A recurring theme that I see over and over again on this site is "If your dog is chewing, he's bored. Get him more exercise."

If I've read that once, I've read it a hundred times. And this advice always strikes me as being #1 over-simplistic, and #2 not entirely logical. The implication is that unless your dog is worn out, they'll get bored, and if they're bored, they'll chew. And that's not right.

I very rarely have chewing issues with either of my dogs, one of which is a malamute. And both of them get only "modest" amounts of exercise. So why don't they chew? They aren't worn out. By this board's definition, they must therefore be bored. But yet they still focus their chewing efforts on their toys and rawhides. So there has to be something else in play here. The equation has got to be more complex than "not enough exercise = chewing".

The Humane Society says this about chewing:

"Adult dogs may engage in destructive chewing for any number of reasons. In order to deal with the behavior, you must first determine why your dog is chewing—and remember, he's not doing it to spite you. Possible reasons for destructive chewing include:

As a puppy, he wasn't taught what to chew and what not to chew.
He's bored.
He suffers from separation anxiety.
His behavior is fear-related.
He wants attention."

Source = http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/destructive_chewing.html

Yes, boredom is on the list. But notice all of the other potential causes of chewing listed. More exercise is not always the answer.
Exercise will help boredom by tiring them out. Exercise will also help separation anxiety (a bit) by releasing endorphins, which helps to relieve stress. Exercise will also help if it's fear related, for the same reason (helping with stress and anxiety).
Exercise will even help if it's a training or attention issue, as a tired dog has less energy to be destructive.

So, more exercise will definitely be a plus, and will most likely improve (and not hurt) the situation. Maybe saying "it's boredom" is a bit of a generalization; maybe it would be better to say "it's lack of exercise." Because "lack of exercise" could contribute to all of the issues on the humane society list. And, by the way, the Humane Society is not the end all and be all of dog training, so using them for reference for dog training is not a very strong reference.

In my opinion, it's like going to a doctor. If you tell your doctor the situation, your doctor will offer a diagnosis based on what you've said (and any subsequent tests he/she orders). With the OP's own info, the dog is obviously UNDER exercised. So, it's a fair assumption that adding exercise will help, not hurt.

Dogs are different. I have one dog that will do anything to get a hold of a shoe. Another of my dogs couldn't care less about shoes. You could offer him a shoe for dinner, and he wouldn't take it. They have different interests. So, if your dogs are under exercised, and don't chew, that could simply be that your dogs aren't big into chewing. My Harper isn't. He just never chewed anything up. Not even toys. Well, he does go after tissues. But, he eats those, it's not a chewing thing.
 
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