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I am dealing with the same issue with my 5-month-old border collie pup. Oh, how I hope she grows out of this well before she is 1 year old!

Our trainer suggested having tiny bits of treats to distract her. It's hard. Some days it feels like I'm rewarding her for biting. But the idea is this: Distract with food. Get her into a "sit" or "down." Then treat her for the sit or down -- not the biting. Unfortunately, I do not wear the treat bag 24/7. Maybe I should.

My girl is very mouthy. She used to put her mouth on me every time I'd try to pet her. A few weeks ago, I started to treat & pet, treat & pet, treat & pet and now she's much better about being touched. In fact, I've since learned that she loves a good belly scratch and enjoys being scratched behind her ears. Though I think she just tolerates me stroking her back and other parts of her body. The real nipping problem comes when she's amped up. She gets so excited that she doesn't just mouth, she nips. Sometimes hard enough to break the skin. This happens when it's time to come back inside after a rousing game of fetch. Happens sometimes, not always, when I try to take something from her that she doesn't want to give up. And it happens when she's really tired and I'm trying to get her into her crate (she sometimes goes willing, but sometimes doesn't). It feels aggressive to my hands and arms, but I know that in her mind she's just initiating play in her own little border collie way.

While I've raised two other dogs from puppy stage over the past 25 years, I'm a complete NOVICE to the mechanics and psychology of dog training. Hopefully, someone with lots of experience and training will come by and answer your question. In the meantime, I would suggest keeping the foster GSD separate from your household pets. And keep lots of treats in a pouch or pocket for those times when you are interacting with the foster pooch. And work with her often, so that she can learn good behavior for her new family. If she ends up in a home with someone who is not as understanding or patient as you, it might be disaster for this little GSD mix.
 

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Ok so we have always been told to not use a crate to punish if you use it other times. So we haven't but might have to.
Do NOT use the crate as punishment. I did that and it was a HUGE mistake. Bad news for all involved.

Many times, I think well meaning, experienced trainers give advice to novice trainers without giving us all the details or step-by-step instructions we need to be competent pet parents. The term "time out," which is common on forums and blogs can easily be translated into something it is not meant to be. For example, when I was told to give my pup a "time out," I did it the same way I would for a school-aged child: scold for misbehavior and send to room. This does not work for a dog. Instead, think of "time out" as "nap time" for a cranky toddler.

For example, when I did "time out," I shook a finger, said "Bad girl. You get a time out," picked up her leash and led her to her crate and gently, but forcibly put her inside. WRONG! WRONG! WRONG! What ended up happening is my pup would hear, "time out" and she'd throw a temper fit. She'd fight the leash, nip at my pant legs (something she'd not done for weeks) and she'd lunge up to nip my arms and hands. By then, I'd have to not-so-gently force her into her crate. In other words, I caused her bad behavior to escalate by using the crate as punishment.

Time out is not supposed to be punishment. It should be a time for the dog to calm down, rest, maybe take a nap while also giving everyone else in the household a break from their naughty behavior.

Now, when she gets to be a brat (which is several times a day), I take a deep breath, tell myself, "This little girl is overtired and we both need a break. Then I calmly lead her to her crate, lure her in with several treats and softly tell her "nap time, sweet girl." At first, it was really hard to get her to go in the crate on her own. It's been 10 days that we are using the "toddler nap" mindset. She is doing much better about going into her crate now. To be honest, at first, I felt like treat-luring her was akin to rewarding her for her bitey behavior. I had to remind myself that I was not rewarding her for the biting, which took place one or two minutes earlier. Instead, I am treat-training her to go calmly into her crate, a safe place where she can calm down, rest and refrain from her nippy behavior.
 
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