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My ten month old puppy has gotten into the habit of sometimes nipping at me when I start to touch him. I tell him "No" in a stern voice, but he doesn't seem to get the message. Any advice or words of wisdom would be much appreciated.
 

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When he nips keep telling him no and then ignore him for 5 or so minutes. When you go to pet him again and he does tell him no and ignore him for another 5 minutes.

He'll eventually learn that he gets no attention if he nips/bites.

Next time when you go to pet him and he doesn't do it, reward him.
 

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Don't rule out that he may have injured himself without your knowlege. Nipping is a natural defensive move. Dogs are often reluctant to show pain and & discomfort until it reaches a critical stage.

Even if that's the cause, you need him to not nip even when in pain. I accept a "nip" with a closed mouth, or even touching his teeth to you without closing at all on you, in those circumstances.

I agree with ignoring, but start with 10 seconds. For me, ignoring for 5 minutes is too much like giving in to his demand to not be touched.
 

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Nipping when you start petting isn't necessarily a demand to not be touched. often times it is a sign of play - especially if you play with your puppy with your hands. (i.e. rough housing)

10 seconds won't register with the dog that he's not supposed to be doing something. If you feel 5 minutes is too long go 1 minute, or 2 minutes.

Personally, waiting 10 seconds for my dog would only encourage her. 5 minutes for her still isn't long enough. I guess it depends on the dog, really.
 

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The issues you are describing are similar to an issue Sarah sometimes exhibits. She will be playing fetch like there is nothing going on.

Suddenly, she will morph into Satan’s gift to canines and start jumping, nipping, and sometimes more than nipping at my legs. Sometimes, she has broken skin on my arms.

I have tried to ignore her and tell her “No!” Sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn’t phase her and she will continue to nip and bite. I leave her outside or put her in her crate for a time out. When I open the outside door or open her crate door later, she is back to the lovable dog my wife and I have come to love.

She is only about 3 ½ months old, so we have time to correct this bad behavior. I also know the time to correct this is now.

What am I doing wrong with Sarah? Is there something I need to be doing?

Any help is appreciated.
 

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With a 14-week-old puppy, it should be enough to pull back suddenly and exclaim "ouch!" If she doesn't stop and look at you quizically, or try to make it up to you by licking, or something, you didn't say it loud enough. Do this enough, you'll have a dog with a soft mouth -- very gentle when he puts his mouth on you (actual experience may vary), a trait many people find highly desireable in a dog.

Of course only a dog knows what a dog knows, but I have my doubts that after 2, 3, 4 minutes a dog even remembers that it's in time-out, let alone for what. (See Horowitz, Inside of a dog)
 

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My ten month old puppy has gotten into the habit of sometimes nipping at me when I start to touch him. I tell him "No" in a stern voice, but he doesn't seem to get the message. Any advice or words of wisdom would be much appreciated.
My 17-month old Kodi still has occasions where he gets nippy. He's just playing though and it is becoming MUCH less frequent. When he was a puppy, you just couldn't pet him at all, but now he enjoys it 99% of the time (without reacting by play biting). Some pups are just mouthy and it takes time to get them to cool it. Kodi is a real roughneck, typical boy, but now, instead of being very difficult to deal with nearly every day, he is now a pleasure to be around nearly every day. Just be consistent with your training. Some dogs are easy, some are more difficult.
 

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Have you read the sticky "The Bite Stops Here"? It has good info on teaching bite inhibition. First, puppies play by using their mouthes. It's normal puppy behavior.
When the puppy bites, say ouch loudly (but not angrily). The puppy will probably bite or nip again. So, say ouch again, but this time leave the room for 20-30 seconds. Puppies are easily distracted and they have short attention spans. So if you stay away for much longer than 30 seconds, the puppy will get bored and find something else to do, and the connection to his behavior will be lost.

The most important thing is to be super consistent and react the same each time for as long as it takes. You aren't just trying to get him to stop biting. You are trying to teach him something. That takes time and repetition.

I would also recommend not using a crate as time out. You want a puppy to like and be comfortable with their crate.
 

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I agree with Doxie:

Some Tweaks to The Bite Stops Here:
Bite Inhibition (to get him to stop biting when he wants to play)
1. When the pup bites, then yelp. It should sound about like what the pup does when you step on its paw...don't step on his paw for a sample :). When you yelp, the pup should startle briefly and stop nipping. Praise and pet. He'll bite.
2. When he bites the second time, Yelp. When he stops, praise and pet. He'll nip again, although it may be a little gentler. ...
3. When he bites a third time, Yelp (see a pattern?). But this time, turn your back for 15 - 30 secs. If he comes around and play bows or barks, then that is an apology. This is important. Accept it, praise and pet... and cringe in expectation of the next nip...
4. When he bites the 4th time, Yelp, then leave the area, placing him in a 2 min. time-out. It is better if you can leave, rather than moving him. Then, return and interact. (He's still hungry...)
5. When he nips the fifth time, yelp, and leave the area, stopping interaction for now.

Pups need to sleep over night in order to learn their lessons. So, keep doing this for 3 days. By the third day, you should notice signficant Bite Inhibition. He may still nip, but it will be softer and he won't draw blood. Keep up the training and make sure that everyone yelps.... Very powerful method.

If you learn the technique, then you can apply the "yelp" to other circumstances, also. I believe that "yelp" is "Please don't do that, I don't like it." in dog communication.
 
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