Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 4 year old red heeler and a 2 year old Shitz Zu - Terrier Mix dog - she is VERY small and a super sweet dog. Both female, the heeler is fixed, but not the little dog. Everywhere we go people ask us where we got her and do we have plans to breed her. She is a cutie. We had another small male dog picked out and we were just waiting for her to go into heat.

The dogs have always got along wonderfully. They play and the heeler is protective and loves on the little one. They are great together.

Well yesterday the heeler has had a drastic change in behaviour towards the little dog. She started to try to hump her and if she couldn't get to her because she was in my lap she would sit and watch her and whine. At some point the little dog gets mad at her and barks at her to get her off her.

Today the heeler hasn't tried to hump her, but continues to whine and is unsettled around her. Gone is the playing, wrestling, etc....

My only thought has been - is there any chance my little dog is pregnant? We do not leave her outside during the day like the heeler. But, a few weeks ago we were out of town on business and one of our parents were watching the dogs for us.

I am worried about the sudden change in the heelers behaviour. The small dog doesn't seem to be doing anything to the heeler.....
Also, worried about my little one being pregnant. :(


Any thoughts or advice would be very much appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
If you have an intact dog around--yes, the dynamics are going to change in your home. When she goes into heat you can expect more squabbles between dogs, more moodiness, more snippiness. Things are going to change the time leading up to her going into heat, while she's in heat, and after. The way you handle the two of them will determine how their relationship stabilizes or escalates.

My personal suggestion would be to spay your Shih-Tzu mix. There is no reason to breed more mixed breeds anyway--go take a look in your local shelter. Shih-Tzus can have notorious genetic problems --LP, Stenotic Nares, Von Willbrand Disease, Renal Cortical Hypoplasia, and Harderian Gland Prolapse (I may be spelling some of these wrong)--some of these won't show up until your dog is older, unless you are willing to do the genetic testing to find out sooner. Your Heeler is obviously having issues with the hormonal changes in the household and this can lead to HUGE problems.

I know you love your little Shih Tzu mix and she is probably an incredibly special dog-- ALL dogs are special. But that doesn't mean that breeding them is the responsible and ethical thing to do, no matter how special they are or how many times you are approached about breeding (heck, if I bred Jack every time I was approached about it, he would be studding 60 litters a year, lol. Thankfully he is neutered). Unfortunately there is a huge problem with people buying "small dogs" as surrogate dolls to dress up and pamper for awhile as an "accessory" and then dump when they get older. I'm sure you're aware of this problem.

You also have an obligation as pack leader of the household (arg, I hate that term but don't know a better one to use) to "keep the peace" between dogs and like I said--with your Heeler having issues with all these hormonal changes--the best thing to do in this situation is spay. Dogs of the same sex can become incredibly aggressive with each other and with the hormones flying now, there can be BIG trouble.

Good luck.

Jen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Well said, jenz. It probably would be easier for all of you to have your dog spayed. As jenz said, I'm sure she is a wonderful dog, but it isn't a good idea to breed dogs that haven't been tested for genetic health problems. A lot can go wrong with breeding too, and you probably don't want to risk your dog having a pregnancy go wrong. Best of luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Adding on to this; because she is a mix, you have no idea what the pups will look like. They could look entirely like the father, they could look like an inbetween or they could turn out just plain ugly. You have no idea.
And like was mentioned, unless you are going to go out and do genetic testing, you have no idea what horrible traits you could be passing on. Please don't add to the 1 million + homeless dogs out there.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top