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You'll get there! Four classes is just the very beginning and it takes time to build confidence and value in the game. Does your class do any drive building activities like restrained recall or circle work or catch the handler games? Some intro classes just focus on getting dogs on equipment because that's what most people want, but finding a class that does those more foundational training will help a ton and you'll see more speed and excitement from her if you build the drive first and then add in obstacles. Or you can do a lot of that stuff yourself

I've found jump grids to be great for building value and confidence in jumping. To start the dog just has to run to a target at the end of a line of jumps and the jumps are kept low. They learn to use their bodies and don't have to think too hard about what you're asking (just drive to the target). A lot of times novice handlers add in a lot of confusion as they're trying to learn things too, so dogs slow down and wait for the handler to figure out where they're going. That's normal and will get better as you both gain confidence, but it's another reason to do things like jump grids that mostly take the handler out of the picture so the dog can focus on their job.

And some dogs are just not that fast. My older dog trots courses about 50% of the time, but he absolutely enjoys agility and will run if I push him or there's a long straight line. He's fast enough to make course times and I have no goals of being super competitive with him, so if he wants to trot because it's hot then he can go for it. A dog doesn't have to run agility like a border collie to be enjoying it.

As far as how to know which sports to stick with, I think it can take a long time of training to really figure that out. I've spent 6 years with my older dog working on obedience and agility and it's now clear that he really enjoys rally, enjoys agility, and doesn't enjoy obedience. But I had to put the work in on all of those sports because I wanted to do them, he didn't decide a few weeks in what he enjoyed and for all of those sports we've taken long breaks here and there and come back to them. The only sports most dogs like right off the bat are instinctive games like barn hunt, nosework, lure coursing, and disc. The other ones require a lot of reinforcement history and building value in the activity as something fun to do with their handler. So find a sport you really enjoy, and then take classes and go for it. There will be ups and downs but most dogs really can enjoy most sports at a basic level if the reward history is there.
 
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