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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,

Just rescued a pitbull mix 2 weeks ago. I already had a 6 month old male neutered beagle golden mix. Have been doing the "2 week shutdown" up until a few days ago when I started taking both of the dogs for walks together and letting the new dog out of her cage. They are great with walks and have shown no signs of aggression towards each other at all, yet.

I have noticed that they start to wrestle inside, and am always keeping both eyes on them to watch and be safe, just in case. The female seems like she is trying to step over and on my male golden and beagle mix. As soon as it starts to get past just sniffing and licking each other, I stop it.

Well last night, I let them go a little further, and it seemed like she was starting to hump on top of him. It was kind of like she was humping the air above him while he was on the floor. I guess this is why it always seemed like she was stepping on him.

Anyway, she is not spayed yet. She goes in on the 22nd to get it done. Is it possible that it is a sexual thing? I heard it can happen when they are in heat? (I havent seen any blood or anything, but have no experience in that area) Or is this a pure dominance thing?

Thanks
 

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It's simply an excitement thing. Lots of dogs, male and female, hump when over stimulated as a release of energy. It is a rude doggie behavior so when she starts just step in and separate her for a short, 1-2 minute, time out to calm down. Keep that up consistently and she'll learn humping = fun play time stops. This works just as well for any other play behaviors you don't like such as her getting too rough with your other dog. Even more helpful when you tie in a vocal cue that can eventually serve as a warning to calm down her play or a time out is coming.

Shortly after she starts making the connection that rude/rough play results in a time out from play you can move to a 3 strikes and your out model. After the third offense play time is over completely and move on to another activity.
 

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Should I be concerned about it? It seems like that is all she wants to do with him. He doesn't seem to mind too much, but every once in a while he barks back at her. But i don't want it to become a fight one day. The idea of a pitbull in a fight scares me.
 

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I'm pretty sure the ideas you're thinking about her are worse than anything likely to happen honestly. You seem overly focused on the idea she's a pit mix. While it is important to keep in mind you seem to be building it up to more than it really is.

Your puppy doesn't seem to mind now but that is likely to change as he gets older. It's something you should be concerned about in the context that it is rude doggie behavior and lots of dogs do NOT tolerate it which could lead to trouble. So like I said work on teaching her rude/too rough play = no more play and she'll learn to stop.
 

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I'm pretty sure the ideas you're thinking about her are worse than anything likely to happen honestly. You seem overly focused on the idea she's a pit mix. While it is important to keep in mind you seem to be building it up to more than it really is.

Your puppy doesn't seem to mind now but that is likely to change as he gets older. It's something you should be concerned about in the context that it is rude doggie behavior and lots of dogs do NOT tolerate it which could lead to trouble. So like I said work on teaching her rude/too rough play = no more play and she'll learn to stop.
Interesting, you could be right. I have just read so many stories on pit bull forums about them attacking other dogs at any given time. That, plus the fact that pit bulls are new to me, I guess im a bit overly cautious. I don't want any dead or injured dogs on my watch and conscience.
 

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I'm pretty sure the ideas you're thinking about her are worse than anything likely to happen honestly. You seem overly focused on the idea she's a pit mix. While it is important to keep in mind you seem to be building it up to more than it really is.

Your puppy doesn't seem to mind now but that is likely to change as he gets older. It's something you should be concerned about in the context that it is rude doggie behavior and lots of dogs do NOT tolerate it which could lead to trouble. So like I said work on teaching her rude/too rough play = no more play and she'll learn to stop.
I agree. Treat her like any new-to-you dog of similar size and energy and supervise. Watch her interactions with him and vice versa. Stop rude play. Yes, some pits are dog aggressive but she's not showing any signs of that (correct?) and while some develop dog aggression as they mature, it tends to be more of a process of becoming less tolerant and less friendly towards strange dogs and such. Many keep their "dog buddies" or continue to do well with the dogs in their household or they can be selectively aggressive toward individual dogs. I think full on attacks without warning are pretty rare and not necessarily at higher rates than many other breeds.

Just as an observation... the pit rescue I foster with has adopted about roughly 200 dogs in 3 years and many of the adoptive households already had 1 or more pit bull type dog. We've had ONE seriously dog aggressive dog (as in, unsafe in public), several that were dog aggressive and needed to be only dogs but were fine on-leash and properly controlled in public, a few dog-reactive but fine with known dogs and the majority of the rest fall somewhere in the spectrum of super dog friendly to dog-tolerant with most being basically dog-friendly towards other friendly, mannered dogs. Some have changed from super dog friendly as puppies to being more just dog-tolerant at maturity (which isn't uncommon among a lot of breeds I have noticed) but I can't think of any that have suddenly become aggressive.
 
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