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Hello! We are getting a bluetick beagle puppy for rabbit hunting + companionship for another dog. Is there anything I should know before getting him? We don't know much about puppies. He'll be living outside in a fairly large pen with dog igloo and tree shelter. Should we have him outside right away or not? We have a screened in porch we could keep him in while he's still a pup
Thanks!
 

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Why does the puppy have to live outside? Is there some reason he can’t live inside with the family? *Some* people have the set-up for outside dogs: large indoor & outdoor runs with both heat and AC, inside time with the family etc.

Can you provide this?
 

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The puppy should NOT be outside anywhere any other dog has been until a week after the puppy has had all of it's vaccinations.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Why does the puppy have to live outside? Is there some reason he can’t live inside with the family? *Some* people have the set-up for outside dogs: large indoor & outdoor runs with both heat and AC, inside time with the family etc.

Can you provide this?
We have an indoor dog that normally doesn't get along with any other dogs, and my mom is allergic to dogs. But Blue (our indoor dog) is an exception. But I have an outdoor dog that needs some companionship. I'm pretty sure he'll get along good with the puppy. Charlie (my dog) is a very energetic dog and I don't have time to give him the long walks he needs, so he lives outside. The pup will either be in a nice sized pen with dog house and tree, coming out often to train & run rabbits, or live in our screened in porch and connected smaller dog pen. But the cats live on the porch so he'll probably live in the pen. FYI he will NOT be chained up. None of our dogs are.
 

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Dogs are social animals, they need to be with their families, and for them, that's their owners. Keeping one outside 24/7 is not good for them unless you can spend several hours per day out there with them.

I can understand the allergy problem but, can't the dogs be kept to certain rooms and, daily vacuuming and dusting be done in those rooms?

I wouldn't recommend any dog in a home where it can never be inside. I know dogs live that way but, I don't think those are good homes for those dogs.
 

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My working dogs are not in the house. I have a house dog. Working dogs have a job and that is what I need them to do. I have two working dogs. One is just starting retirement and because she does not get along with the house dog I have rotated them while trying to find a better place for this just retired dog to go live.

As little puppies I do have them in the house (and put the house dog in a crate) to acclimate them and to teach them a little about house training. Once they reach a certain age they spend more time outside in a kennel and are crated inside at night. I currently have two full size kennels down stairs for bad weather (too hot or too cold).

I believe you are starting a hunting dog and that means more of a working dog than a pet.

I would raise and train the puppy indoors until around 16 weeks old (using a crate of course) at which time I would transition to outside.
 

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Hunting dog- if this is going to be a serious hunting dog, a working dog like 3gsd said, I'd start acclimating it to outdoor conditions at a young age. Dogs living outside handle extremes of temperature and weather much much better than indoor dogs. Their bodies and even their coats will be different than an indoor dog. There is a definate difference in the hardiness of outdoor dogs. We've had several of both, of the same breed. In our case its the heat- and the outdoor dogs handled heat much much better.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Dogs are social animals, they need to be with their families, and for them, that's their owners. Keeping one outside 24/7 is not good for them unless you can spend several hours per day out there with them.

I can understand the allergy problem but, can't the dogs be kept to certain rooms and, daily vacuuming and dusting be done in those rooms?

I wouldn't recommend any dog in a home where it can never be inside. I know dogs live that way but, I don't think those are good homes for those dogs.
We will be spending a lot of time devoted to him. Taking walks, training, chasing rabbits, and just general play time/bonding time.

We don't have a very large house, so we can't keep him in a certain portion of it especially if our other dog and him don't get along, but if the weather gets to hot/cold we will have him inside in a crate away from the other dog, and sometimes outside the crate still away from our other dog :)

As for dogs living outside, it all depends on the dog itself and what living situations the dog has outside. And as you said, how much time he spends with his owners also greatly matters. He will have good living conditions and will spend a lot of time with us every day. And I don't know if you have ever owned a rabbit dog, or if you hunt at all, but hunting dogs are kept outside a lot, since they normally have a lot of energy, as is needed for rabbit dogs. He's lived outside his whole puppy life anyway with his mom and siblings, so he's used to living outside.

Everyone has their own opinions about dogs living outside. One thing I don't do and don't think anyone should do is keep their dogs chained.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
My working dogs are not in the house. I have a house dog. Working dogs have a job and that is what I need them to do. I have two working dogs. One is just starting retirement and because she does not get along with the house dog I have rotated them while trying to find a better place for this just retired dog to go live.

As little puppies I do have them in the house (and put the house dog in a crate) to acclimate them and to teach them a little about house training. Once they reach a certain age they spend more time outside in a kennel and are crated inside at night. I currently have two full size kennels down stairs for bad weather (too hot or too cold).

I believe you are starting a hunting dog and that means more of a working dog than a pet.

I would raise and train the puppy indoors until around 16 weeks old (using a crate of course) at which time I would transition to outside.
Yes, he will be more of a working dog than pet, but we will also spend bonding time with him so he gets to know us as his owners :) He has lived outside since he was born (in an outdoor enclosure and outside of it some for playtime with his litter mates once he was old enough).We will take him inside in a crate when it gets to hot/cold.

I hope you get everything figured out with your retired dog! :D
 

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He has already been vaccinated more than a week ago. :)
Be aware of this:
Vaccines do not "take" until after a puppy is 16 weeks old and is clear of the Mother's antibodies. This is why you wait until at least 16 weeks to do a rabies shot.

A dog's immune system develops just like the rest of the dog.. skeleton, muscles, teeth and so forth. The dog's OWN immune system is not developed until 12-16 weeks old.

When a puppy is born it has no immunity. It gets its immunity from Colostrum (the first milk from the mother) and it must have colostrum in the first 12-18 hours. The antibodies in the colostrum are absorbed through the stomach wall and provide immunity.

These antibodies interfere with the vaccine and the immune response to the vaccine in the puppy. At 16 weeks it has been pretty well proven the mother antibodies have cleared and the puppy has its own immune system so can mount a response to a vaccine intended to create immunity.

While your puppy has been vaccinated, it may or may not be immune to parvo and distemper unless the vaccine was administered after 16 weeks old. Also, a puppy this age needs to be wormed a few times the first year. Round worms are the biggest issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you don't have enough time for your current dog, how are you going to have time for another puppy?
I do have time for my current dog (Charlie), I just don't have two extra hours a day to take him for a walk, so he has free range of our yard. I do spend time with him playing fetch every day (before he either tears his toy up or hides it somewhere, then I have to get him a new one), and he also lays on my lap and I pet him for 10-15 minutes at a time.

And the new puppy, which we got Tuesday and he's doing great, is not only my dog, he's also my dad's. My dad is the one who is going to be mainly hunting rabbits with him. We both care for him taking him out for short walks and playing with him until he gets tired/thirsty then we take a break.

Also, long story short, my dad and I are watching a house until the owners get back, and one day when we went there we found a stray kitten. Yesterday we took Gus (the puppy) to see him, and they loved each other. The kitten was rubbing up against him purring while Gus was jumping around and trying to play with him a little like a little puppy does. The kitten doesn't seem to have any type of sickness. They really like each other and the kitten doesn't have any other animals to play with and our other dogs aren't used to Gus yet. Should we keep taking him to see the kitten? Thanks!
 

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Keep the puppy away from the kitten until he is fully vaccinated. Cats and cat feces can carry several diseases and parasites dogs can get and, the cat my not show any symptoms. If you really want the kitten to be a friend for your puppy, adopt the little stray and get him to a vet for proper care before you let them play together.

Being a strays the chances of the kitten having worms and fleas is very high, even if that isn't immediately obvious and, your puppy doesn't need either of those, among the other things that cat might be carrying and, likely isn't vaccinated for.
 
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