Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I got a 9wk old pup the other day and I'm unsure how I should proceed with his training while protecting him from parvo. I live in an apartment complex with lots of dogs, in a neighborhood with lots of dogs, and a dog park across the street. The owners all-around seem responsible and I don't really see strays or suspicious owners. Ideally I'd like to train the pup to outdoor potty, which I initiated the first day on a side street but have since stopped due to my parvo concerns after reading more about it and talking with the neighborhood vet. The vet suggested I protect him somewhat and parvo isn't uncommon. I feel stuck. Many emphasize outdoor training, but it often seems this info is meant for people living in houses in suburbia, not city apartment dwellers.

Should I continue outdoor training? Should I use puppy pads indoors until he gets a few boosters (got one today)? How about indoor grass (I don't have balcony)? Or what about training him to go on the concrete in our building's covered garage?

I don't mind if it'll take some effort later to potty train properly, his health is most important to me. On that note, should I consider doing a pre-emptive parvo test in case he was exposed when I took him outside for a day, rather than wait for symptoms?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,834 Posts
In apartments were you can't control access to the outside, it is generally frowned upon to let puppies be on the ground, especially in a place highly trafficked by dogs that you can't confirm have been vaccinated. You can, however, lay out puppy pads outside on the grass so they can't come into contact with the ground. You can also carry your puppy to new places, once again, never allowing contact with the ground via puppy pad if they have to potty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I can’t answer your potty training question but... I’d try to find a few new dog friends that have enclosed clean yards or inside places for you to puppy date with. I asked friends and found some responsible owners through dog groups. If their dog is well and vaccinated and calm and well trained with an enclosed yard that only that dog goes... it would be great socialization for yours. Even just playing with a safe dog inside a friend’s apartment. Also a lot of folks encourage puppy training classes where the rooms are sterilized and the dogs are as vaccinated as they can be for their young age. You’ll have to decide your choice on that. Ideal Puppy socialization window ends before rabies vaccine is given.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
I don't mind if it'll take some effort later to potty train properly, his health is most important to me. On that note, should I consider doing a pre-emptive parvo test in case he was exposed when I took him outside for a day, rather than wait for symptoms?
If the health of your puppy is so important to you, (congrats btw), then you should learn about the dangers of vaccines, they are not benign and they carry risks. The vaccine will have wiped out your puppy's natural protection from maternal antibodies and has replaced them with vaccine-derived antibodies which take about two weeks for the body to produce. Parvo is a viral disease, there is no preemptive treatment for it, you have to wait for symptoms and manage those. The test for parvo is a titer test which looks for antibodies, the irony is antibodies can either mean a dog is immune or they are sick with the disease.

I don't vaccinate at all, and I have a 22-week old (vaccine-free) puppy from a natural rearing breeder, and he has been out and about since I got him at 10 weeks, I, of course, didn't take him to places like dog parks (still don't and won't), and gradually increased his outside time and exposure to higher dog areas. He is the picture of health and vitality. There is a procedure of natural immunity that many people follow.

https://vitalanimal.com/prevent-parvo-distemper/
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,294 Posts
If the health of your puppy is so important to you, (congrats btw), then you should learn about the dangers of vaccines, they are not benign and they carry risks. The vaccine will have wiped out your puppy's natural protection from maternal antibodies and has replaced them with vaccine-derived antibodies which take about two weeks for the body to produce. Parvo is a viral disease, there is no preemptive treatment for it, you have to wait for symptoms and manage those. The test for parvo is a titer test which looks for antibodies, the irony is antibodies can either mean a dog is immune or they are sick with the disease.

I don't vaccinate at all, and I have a 22-week old (vaccine-free) puppy from a natural rearing breeder, and he has been out and about since I got him at 10 weeks, I, of course, didn't take him to places like dog parks (still don't and won't), and gradually increased his outside time and exposure to higher dog areas. He is the picture of health and vitality. There is a procedure of natural immunity that many people follow.

https://vitalanimal.com/prevent-parvo-distemper/
Aren't you and your puppy lucky to be benefiting from herd immunity?

Maternal antibodies wear off. The vaccine replaces those. Puppies who have not been vaccinated and have either not received maternal antibodies, or have aged enough to have those wear off, have a high risk of parvo if exposed in the environment.

Some locations have low parvo in the environment due to a combination of high vaccination rates among dogs, low exposure to wild canines and to some degree, very harsh winters. In those areas, unvaccinated dogs may be able to "get by" relying on herd immunity. In areas with high parvo risk, unvaccinated puppies have a scary level of parvo-- like several cases a week seen at any given vet clinic-- and while prompt treatment for symptoms has reduced death percentages a fair bit, it is still an deadly disease that can hit quickly and be costly to provide the IV fluids and monitoring needed to care.

I think Mizram vs others have been down the road of vaccine debates before and I don't want to go there again, but basically, a combination of science and not wanting to see puppies die painful deaths make me comment here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
If your walking around the apartment complex you could just as easily bring parvo in on your shoes to your puppy if there is any there
Yea parvo is a concern I have a puppy too and worry about it but just try to be smart about where u and ur puppy go
If dogs are in the apartment complex don’t they have to show that they have had their shots?



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
If the health of your puppy is so important to you, (congrats btw), then you should learn about the dangers of vaccines, they are not benign and they carry risks. The vaccine will have wiped out your puppy's natural protection from maternal antibodies and has replaced them with vaccine-derived antibodies which take about two weeks for the body to produce. Parvo is a viral disease, there is no preemptive treatment for it, you have to wait for symptoms and manage those. The test for parvo is a titer test which looks for antibodies, the irony is antibodies can either mean a dog is immune or they are sick with the disease.
Yes, there are risks from vaccines, just as there are risks from everything in life. However, having watched puppies die from parvo and distemper, I'll take my chances with the vaccines, thank you very much, and thank modern medicine that so many communicable diseases are so easily prevented.

Antibodies from vaccines do not "wipe out" maternal antibodies. Quite the opposite, in fact. Maternal antibodies, which wear off over time, can interfere with vaccinations, which is why young animals (dogs, cats, horses, humans, etc.) receive a series of vaccines over time.

There are certainly newer protocols on vaccination than "shots every two weeks from ages 6 to 16 weeks and annual boosters", but they do still recommend that puppies get a series of vaccinations over the course of 8 to 12 weeks, and at least one adult booster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I do vaccinate my dog but, I and my vet both feel most dogs are over vaccinated. My vet does a 5 way at 12 weeks, another at 16 weeks and, rabies at 16 weeks and, every 3 years thereafter since that is what the law requires. He does do a yearly titer on the dogs but, has yet to find one that needed re vaccinated after the first two except one very illness prone, something new every month type of designer dog he treats that is totally pampered and never gets outside except at the dog park and, the dog friendly cafe in town.

Mine, who don't go to the dog park but do go to the cafe and, have outdoor runs, go camping, eat a prey model raw diet, have never needed re vaccinated. The oldest is 8 years old and, only get rabies when the law requires.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top