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Hey all! My husband and I are getting a sweet Rough Collie (3 1/2 month old. needed to be re-homed due to owners moving.)
Here's my question! We visited her yesterday and will pick her up on Friday night. Her current owner said she has fleas but she gave her the last bit of frontline plus yesterday! She still has some flakey skin and bumps from the bites. (They've been keeping her outside, but she will be living inside with us). We are going to give her a bath straight when she gets home to help relieve the itching. Since she's still outside, will frontline keep all the fleas off her? Since she will be finished with frontline plus, could I give her a flea and tick shampoo bath, or just an oatmeal bath? (specifically with Earth Bath) I don't want insecticides to mix and cause more irritation! Just wanted to know what others would do in our situation! :) I'll see if I can't upload a picture here soon! :) (Also if you guys have any better shampoos to offer I would love any insight! :D )
 

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I wonder about that "last bit of Frontline" statement. So far as I know all those kind of applications are something applied once every so many months. You don't say where you live. Are fleas a big problem there year around? For me, I'd figure she's had quite enough of heavy chemicals. A bath in any soap will kill fleas on her - doing a good job washing the head is always a problem - but of course a bath like that won't affect those she picks up after the bath. If the Frontline was properly applied, it should keep her flea-free once she's in a decent environment.
 

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Frontline is a topical medication, and the entire, appropriately sized, tube should be applied, and the application is supposed to last for four weeks.. Depending on where you live, Frontline may or may not be effective. I've not had much luck with it, and use Advantage (topical) for the cats and Nexguard (chewable) for the dogs.

Bathing them within 24 hours of applying Frontline can make it less effective.

As far as favorite shampoo, I like Chubbs bars. They have a website, or you can buy it through Amazon. It's a solid bar, not a liquid, which I find easier to deal with.
 

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i would see what she looks like once she comes home, from there i'd do a bath, since she lives outside I'm sure she needs it, and it will kill any extra flees. I use the oster oatmeal shampoo, and i've never had any issues.
 

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I wonder about that "last bit of Frontline" statement. So far as I know all those kind of applications are something applied once every so many months. You don't say where you live. Are fleas a big problem there year around? For me, I'd figure she's had quite enough of heavy chemicals. A bath in any soap will kill fleas on her - doing a good job washing the head is always a problem - but of course a bath like that won't affect those she picks up after the bath. If the Frontline was properly applied, it should keep her flea-free once she's in a decent environment.
I meant to take that part out as I proofed it xD That's great to know! My mom always used Advantage so I guess I was more curious how Frontline worked! We are in Georgia (US). They can be a big problem depending on the area (not in our area, suburbs, but can be in farm areas thanks to how warm it is xD )
 

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i would see what she looks like once she comes home, from there i'd do a bath, since she lives outside I'm sure she needs it, and it will kill any extra flees. I use the oster oatmeal shampoo, and i've never had any issues.
Awesome thank you!
 

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I meant to take that part out as I proofed it xD That's great to know! My mom always used Advantage for our cats growing up, so I guess I was more curious how Frontline worked! We are in Georgia (US). They can be a big problem depending on the area (not in our area, suburbs, but can be in farm areas thanks to how warm it is xD )
 

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Grab a box of Capstar for dogs at the appropriate weight dosage. Most PetSmarts and Petcos carry it or use Chewy or Amazon if you have prime shipping.

its an oral med that kills the adult fleas rapidly, it is not meant as a lasting preventative treatment but rather quick relief for the dog and to help break the flea lifecycle (and reduce how many get in your house)

it is generally considered safe for MDR1 mutant dogs. which by the way, you should assume your rough collie is mdr1 mutant until genetically tested otherwise.
BE AWARE OF DRUG INTERACTIONS

give a bath with regular dog shampoo, Earth Bath is a good brand. Rinse very well to wash away the shampoo and fleas both.

give the Capstar once per week until its been four weeks since she had an unknown dosage of Frontline and start her on a brandname topical or oral flea AND tick med of your choice, ask yiur vet for what works best locally as fleas become resistant in some areas to different medications.

Vacuum your house every single day during that month and empty the canister to an outside trash can immediately after.

in Georgia, you will need to use flea/tick and heartworm medications year round. It just does not get cold enough for long enough to kill mosquitoes etc that transmist diseases.
 

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I meant to take that part out as I proofed it xD That's great to know! My mom always used Advantage so I guess I was more curious how Frontline worked! We are in Georgia (US). They can be a big problem depending on the area (not in our area, suburbs, but can be in farm areas thanks to how warm it is xD )
It is good that you did not take out the mention of the "last bit of Frontline" as its important for what meds to give or not give her when she first arrives.

My guess is that the old owner either buys the largest dosage Frontline and splits it up over several smaller dogs to save money (not recommended due to impercise dosing, could give too much or too little)
or
the old owner thinks it will last longer by giving a portion of the once per month dose each week and this week finished up the "last bit"
(this is also not recommended because the topical drugs are designed specifically for once per month use and formulated to last that long but not linger so much that the next dose is too much)

either can mean ineffective meds which could explain the fleas but it can also mean you have no idea how much the dog was given (could be on the high side making any other new topical treatment too soon possibly dangerous)

there are also oral flea and tick meds but they are newer and some last longer for fleas than for ticks in the same pill which IMO makes it hard to consistently cover both needs.

Always take a new dog for a vet check within the first week of ownership. You'll be able to get started with prescription only heartworm preventative and have the dog checked for intestinal parasite which can be transmitted by fleas
 

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Maybe it's just me, but if I were getting a 3.5 month old puppy that I knew had been dosed with chemical stuff but wasn't sure about how properly it was done, I'd lay off other chemical anythings for at least a month. Being me, more probably until the baby was 6 months old. And I seem to remember collies are particularly sensitive to some of that kind of stuff. Even in a warm climate high flea problem area, I'd set myself to control them for at least that month with bathing, flea comb (she hasn't got adult coat yet, right?), diatomaceous earth (look up how it's used for flea treatment - you have to use the kind people can ingest), etc.
 

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Maybe it's just me, but if I were getting a 3.5 month old puppy that I knew had been dosed with chemical stuff but wasn't sure about how properly it was done, I'd lay off other chemical anythings for at least a month. Being me, more probably until the baby was 6 months old. And I seem to remember collies are particularly sensitive to some of that kind of stuff. Even in a warm climate high flea problem area, I'd set myself to control them for at least that month with bathing, flea comb (she hasn't got adult coat yet, right?), diatomaceous earth (look up how it's used for flea treatment - you have to use the kind people can ingest), etc.
That's what I was thinking too! I didn't want to over do it! We're planning a vet visit soon, by my family's vet! :)
 

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It is good that you did not take out the mention of the "last bit of Frontline" as its important for what meds to give or not give her when she first arrives.

My guess is that the old owner either buys the largest dosage Frontline and splits it up over several smaller dogs to save money (not recommended due to impercise dosing, could give too much or too little)
or
the old owner thinks it will last longer by giving a portion of the once per month dose each week and this week finished up the "last bit"
(this is also not recommended because the topical drugs are designed specifically for once per month use and formulated to last that long but not linger so much that the next dose is too much)

either can mean ineffective meds which could explain the fleas but it can also mean you have no idea how much the dog was given (could be on the high side making any other new topical treatment too soon possibly dangerous)

there are also oral flea and tick meds but they are newer and some last longer for fleas than for ticks in the same pill which IMO makes it hard to consistently cover both needs.

Always take a new dog for a vet check within the first week of ownership. You'll be able to get started with prescription only heartworm preventative and have the dog checked for intestinal parasite which can be transmitted by fleas
Thank you so much! Luckily she is sending me the dosage amount so I'll actually know what my sweet girl has! We're planning on taking her in as soon as we can to my family's trusted vet. I'm planning on just giving her a bath and combing her constantly until I get her in to the vet to get looked over! :)
 

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That's what I was thinking too! I didn't want to over do it! We're planning a vet visit soon, by my family's vet! :)
I'd suggest calling the vet before hand to get their advice because as much as possible, you want to deal with the fleas before the puppy sets foot in your house (and don't forget about cleaning your car too).

I get the concern about use of multiple treatments ( "chemicals" is pretty much anything including just plain shampoo) and I am not a vet, but having received foster dogs who were absolutely miserable with fleas, there is really something to be said for immediately killing the adult fleas who are actively biting. Since she has some reaction on her skin to the fleas, it would be even more a priority IMO.

Capstar is designed to be taken even as close as 24 hrs apart so a week apart is error on caution and is designed to be taken in conjunction with a topical treatment. It is LIKELY but not a certainty that given the dog having active flea infestation now, she is probably under-treated with Frontline than over-treated but my suggestion to wait for one month since last Frontline is a cautionary time period.

Definitely DON'T use the cheap Hartz brand flea shampoo or similar dollar store type OTC shampoos or treatments. Those can be toxic.

EDIT TO ADD:
Its right to have caution for meds with a Collie in particular so I'm not trying to push anything that might conflict with your vet's advice, just highlighting that there can be benefits to careful use of oral and topical flea treatments at the correct weight based dosage.

for peace of mind, if you have the cash to spare, you can get a genetic test using a mail-in oral swab to test for mdr1 which is very good to know for future stuff like anesthetics during spay or other surgery. Doesn't do anything for the immediate flea problem but its nice information and possible reassurance if your collie is in the 30% or so that is not affected by the mutation that affects drug processing and sensitivity
 

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I'd suggest calling the vet before hand to get their advice because as much as possible, you want to deal with the fleas before the puppy sets foot in your house (and don't forget about cleaning your car too).

I get the concern about use of multiple treatments ( "chemicals" is pretty much anything including just plain shampoo) and I am not a vet, but having received foster dogs who were absolutely miserable with fleas, there is really something to be said for immediately killing the adult fleas who are actively biting. Since she has some reaction on her skin to the fleas, it would be even more a priority IMO.

Capstar is designed to be taken even as close as 24 hrs apart so a week apart is error on caution and is designed to be taken in conjunction with a topical treatment. It is LIKELY but not a certainty that given the dog having active flea infestation now, she is probably under-treated with Frontline than over-treated but my suggestion to wait for one month since last Frontline is a cautionary time period.

Definitely DON'T use the cheap Hartz brand flea shampoo or similar dollar store type OTC shampoos or treatments. Those can be toxic.

EDIT TO ADD:
Its right to have caution for meds with a Collie in particular so I'm not trying to push anything that might conflict with your vet's advice, just highlighting that there can be benefits to careful use of oral and topical flea treatments at the correct weight based dosage.

for peace of mind, if you have the cash to spare, you can get a genetic test using a mail-in oral swab to test for mdr1 which is very good to know for future stuff like anesthetics during spay or other surgery. Doesn't do anything for the immediate flea problem but its nice information and possible reassurance if your collie is in the 30% or so that is not affected by the mutation that affects drug processing and sensitivity
Thank you so much! We are giving her an oatmeal shampoo bath and she has a vet appointment on Monday morning! I'm going to talk to them about getting her MDR1 tested! :)
 

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MDR1 testing is something you can do yourself. VetGen, Vetnostics, and GenSol all sell the test kit directly to pet owners. You just follow the collection instructions and send the swabs back to the company.
 
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