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Hi everyone

I'm new to this forum, and new to owning a dog. I've spent a fair bit of time reading up and watching vids on getting a puppy, on Dog Forums and other places in the internet, but would like a bit more advice if possible please.

Now i suspect that my expectations might be a little bit too high, and that i'm probably a little bit impatient, but i suppose i'm just looking for a bit of reassurance that i'm on the right track, and that things will improve over time.

Our puppy is a 13 week old Sydney Silkie/Yorkshire Terrier cross who we got just over a week and a half ago. She's gorgeous, and both my wife and i have fallen in love with her, but we just can't seem to curtail her biting. I've read 'The Bite Stops Here' and we are trying the techniques listed, but they don't seem to have any effect on her.

We've tried techniques like putting toys that she is allowed to bite in her mouth when she tries to bite us, saying "Owwww!" and withdrawing from play, saying "Owwww! you mean girl! That's it! No more fun!" and leaving the room, closing the door behind us. I saw vids about holding her down, which i've since found out is called the Alpha Roll, and which only seem to rile her up even more (i also now know that the Alpha Roll is not recommended, and that the theory behind it has been debunked - seems there's a lot of conflicting info out there!).

Dr Ian Dunbar suggests that the biting should have stopped by 3 months, so i'm wondering if it's just because her training has started a bit late? I admit i've found myself getting a bit riled up too, and on occasion have resorted to grabbing her bottom jaw when she bites me. she just pulls away when i let go and then has another try at biting me.

On the positive side, she now seems to be house-trained (but does have the occasional accident), seems to be crate-trained, is able to sit on command, and behaves during the night, and when i am at college in the morning (i'm home every afternoon).

We do a lot of play, because i know that a tired dog is a good dog. So should we just keep going with what we are doing? Or should i modify what i'm doing?

She seems to have accepted her collar and registration tag now, and we started leash training earlier in the week - just letting her drag it round for the first new days, and starting to put a bit of pressure on it now; she hates it, whimpers, cries, pulls away. Again, will it improve over time?

I get the logic behind these training techniques, but i'm confused as to the timeframe i should be expecting for improved behaviour. Does anyone have any other advice or suggestions?

Many thanks :)
 

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Welcome to the forum and to puppiness.

Did you read the part where Ian says it will get worse before it gets better? Have you gotten there yet? Be reassured, your perseverance (more than the pups) will see you through.

Honestly, bite inhibition is a lifetime thing. Not that it will be an issue for a lifetime, but it's one of those things to always follow the rules of bite inhibition. That said, the 3 month rule is not that concrete IMO. Just keep the pattern and your pup will figure it out. Your pup is that formative.

There should be rules to games, and you set those rules. Once the dog is too excited, the game ends. If either of you feels the need to be forceful, the game ends. Like I said, your pup is that formative, so stay away from forcing the dog or physically manipulating the dog to change behavior. You want to bond with the dog, and gain the dogs trust. Physically manipulating her can ruin that, so don't tempt it.

As for the leash, how are you forming a positive association with it? Go to the video "Conditioning an emotional response", here: http://abrionline.org/videos.php. You'll want to do the same with the leash.
 

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It sounds to me like you are doing great! the occasional accident on your part happens...do you tether her to you inside? It helps a lot.

Flirt poles are also really cool- one of my dogs love 'em.

My dogs were pretty vicious nippers until about 4-5 months. It literally stopped overnight! But in the meantime, a few of my yoga pants and sweatshirts are ruined, but I look at those holes with love!

Hi everyone

I'm new to this forum, and new to owning a dog. I've spent a fair bit of time reading up and watching vids on getting a puppy, on Dog Forums and other places in the internet, but would like a bit more advice if possible please.

Now i suspect that my expectations might be a little bit too high, and that i'm probably a little bit impatient, but i suppose i'm just looking for a bit of reassurance that i'm on the right track, and that things will improve over time.

Our puppy is a 13 week old Sydney Silkie/Yorkshire Terrier cross who we got just over a week and a half ago. She's gorgeous, and both my wife and i have fallen in love with her, but we just can't seem to curtail her biting. I've read 'The Bite Stops Here' and we are trying the techniques listed, but they don't seem to have any effect on her.

We've tried techniques like putting toys that she is allowed to bite in her mouth when she tries to bite us, saying "Owwww!" and withdrawing from play, saying "Owwww! you mean girl! That's it! No more fun!" and leaving the room, closing the door behind us. I saw vids about holding her down, which i've since found out is called the Alpha Roll, and which only seem to rile her up even more (i also now know that the Alpha Roll is not recommended, and that the theory behind it has been debunked - seems there's a lot of conflicting info out there!).

Dr Ian Dunbar suggests that the biting should have stopped by 3 months, so i'm wondering if it's just because her training has started a bit late? I admit i've found myself getting a bit riled up too, and on occasion have resorted to grabbing her bottom jaw when she bites me. she just pulls away when i let go and then has another try at biting me.

On the positive side, she now seems to be house-trained (but does have the occasional accident), seems to be crate-trained, is able to sit on command, and behaves during the night, and when i am at college in the morning (i'm home every afternoon).

We do a lot of play, because i know that a tired dog is a good dog. So should we just keep going with what we are doing? Or should i modify what i'm doing?

She seems to have accepted her collar and registration tag now, and we started leash training earlier in the week - just letting her drag it round for the first new days, and starting to put a bit of pressure on it now; she hates it, whimpers, cries, pulls away. Again, will it improve over time?

I get the logic behind these training techniques, but i'm confused as to the timeframe i should be expecting for improved behaviour. Does anyone have any other advice or suggestions?

Many thanks :)
 

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keep training, wait it out. I was in the same situation a few months ago, doing my best with lots of reading but my first pup. It will get better, I promise, although mine took a lot longer than 3 months, more like 5-6 and it is amazingly better, we sacrificed some skin and clothing to the pup as well. Definitely have expectations, but just like baby books and milestones vary in people, same with dogs. keep training, keep enjoying short puppyhood!
 

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Re-read the Sticky:the Bite Stops Here. perhaps you haven't been sticking with it long enough. Read this and note the 3 days and the apology....She ignored the Yelp!, because you ignored the apology. Instead of the Yelp, you can say Ouch! or Oops!

Some Tweaks to Bite Inhibition (to get her to stop biting when she wants to play or otherwise):
1. When the pup bites, then yelp. It should sound about like what the pup does when you step on its paw... don't step on her paw for a sample :). When you yelp, the pup should startle briefly and stop nipping. Praise and pet. SHe'll bite.
2. When she bites the second time, Yelp. When she stops, praise and pet. SHe'll nip again, although it may be a little gentler. ...
3. When she bites a third time, Yelp (see a pattern?). But this time, turn your back for 15 - 30 secs. If she comes around and play bows or barks, then that is an apology. This is important. Accept it, praise and pet... and cringe in expectation of the next nip...
4. When she bites the 4th time, Yelp, then leave the area, placing her in a 2 min. time-out. It is better if you can leave, rather than moving her. Then, return and interact. (SHe's still hungry...)
5. When she nips the fifth time, yelp, and leave the area, stopping interaction for now.

You can modify the number of steps, but not what you do...

Pups need to sleep over night in order to learn their lessons. So, keep doing this for 3 days. By the third day, you should notice signficant Bite Inhibition. SHe may still nip, but it will be softer and she won't draw blood. And, she should be less aggressive, especially, if you notice the apology. Keep up the training and make sure that everyone yelps.... Very powerful method.

If you learn the technique, then you can apply the "yelp" to other circumstances, also. I believe that "yelp" is "Please don't do that, I don't like it." in dog communication. I currently use the yelp when my dog plays tug, then runs with the toy, when he fetches and keeps it out of reach or when he takes a treat too quickly....
 
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