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My family as recently adopted a Shepherd Pit Mix puppy. She is 5 months and we absolutely adore her! However, we are now taking in one of her siblings (a boy) due to him being placed in an abusive home. Is there any advice on how to re-socialize these two? It has been months since they have seen each other and have had extremely different experiences. Also, how can we help the other dog feel loved and not scared, like how he is at his present place?

Thank you in advance!
 

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The situation is very complicated, but patience will make things work! Firstly, you already have a Shepherd Pit Mix (girl puppy), so you are familiar with the character and behavior. The other puppy lived in bad conditions, so you need to make him feel safe and loved again. Take some time to play with him exclusively, pet him, give him treats. You will probably need help of another person, because in the beginning, it is better to keep them in the separate rooms and slowly introduce them to each other. When you finally decide two of them should meet (again!), make sure they are on leads, and that both handlers are calm and relaxed. They need to realize they are not threat to each other!
This process is very complex, but after all , you want things to work, to have a happy fury family! The least you can do is go step by step, and let things go naturally! Be calm, patient and self-confident, and your dogs will feel the same!
 

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Maybe the way the two of them get along will surprise you. I recently saw a video where two dogs that were litter mates were reunited when their owners got together. It was like they instantly remembered each other and were so happy to see each other again. Now both of these dogs were very loved by their individual owners so it is a different scenario. You have gotten some great advice above. I do hope both of your dogs will become best of buds.
 

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Before you agree to take on this other puppy, please look into Littermate Syndrome. This is, in a nutshell, when two puppies of similar ages bond more with each other than with their human handlers. Doesn't matter if they were from the same litter or not. These pups are young, and even yours isn't likely to be bonded with a human handler as much as she would be if she was older. Littermate Syndrome can be bad because the two dogs might become stressed if separated. What happens if one dies, or one has to go to the vet but the other does not?

In order to prevent Littermate Syndrome, you must do everything with the puppies separately! They must be crated in separate crates, in separate rooms. Walk them separately, feed separately, train separately. They are 4 times the work, not 2 times! It doesn't mean they can never play together, but it is so very important that you ensure they bond with you rather than each other!

If you do decide to move forward adopting the other puppy, introduce them in a neutral space, like a park. Take a little stroll, allow them time to get used to each other. Since they're puppies, I imagine they will want to play more quickly then introducing an adult dog, so at that point you can take them to your yard and let them play. After that, you will want to separate them with baby gates or crate and rotate, not only to prevent Littermate Syndrome, but to allow the new pup time to get used to your household.
 

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Before you agree to take on this other puppy, please look into Littermate Syndrome. This is, in a nutshell, when two puppies of similar ages bond more with each other than with their human handlers. Doesn't matter if they were from the same litter or not. These pups are young, and even yours isn't likely to be bonded with a human handler as much as she would be if she was older. Littermate Syndrome can be bad because the two dogs might become stressed if separated. What happens if one dies, or one has to go to the vet but the other does not?

In order to prevent Littermate Syndrome, you must do everything with the puppies separately! They must be crated in separate crates, in separate rooms. Walk them separately, feed separately, train separately. They are 4 times the work, not 2 times! It doesn't mean they can never play together, but it is so very important that you ensure they bond with you rather than each other!

If you do decide to move forward adopting the other puppy, introduce them in a neutral space, like a park. Take a little stroll, allow them time to get used to each other. Since they're puppies, I imagine they will want to play more quickly then introducing an adult dog, so at that point you can take them to your yard and let them play. After that, you will want to separate them with baby gates or crate and rotate, not only to prevent Littermate Syndrome, but to allow the new pup time to get used to your household.
 
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