Puppy Forum and Dog Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I just joined dogforums. I'm just trying to do all the research before making a home for a pet from a shelter. I haven't had a dog as a companion for maybe thirty years, and I am really trying to get it right the first time if I can. I know I'll find a bunch of answers in the forums, but any quick advice here is always much appreciated. I'm a bit older, live alone in a smallish two-bedroom third-floor walk-up apartment, and do a lot of work at home. I think these living circumstances (no back yard, for example, though there is a dog park nearby) will limit my adoption options (no big dogs, and, perhaps - much as I would like one - no senior dogs).
Anyway, I'm glad to have found what looks to be a caring, rational community, and thank you in advance for advice and counsel. All the Best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Odysseus,

Your circumstances sounds more or less perfect for one of the toy breeds. A mature dog of one of those breeds might work if it's not too energetic or too loud for hours on end. Speaking from experience you might just see a dog one day and go ''that's what I'm looking for'' so don't rush into it or adopt one on impulse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,384 Posts
I have lived in all kinds of environments with my guys and they have done great to be happy working with what we have. it's a 365 days a year after year consideration, all kinds of weather, and not only your dog being a companion for you, but you being present to be a companion for them. That would be the main thing when deciding how big of a life change bringing in a pet can be when you haven't had one for so long. Best wishes finding the one that you connect with. It's worth it. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both WesselGordon and PatriciafromCO for the kind and good advice. A toy or small breed (or mixed breed) will probably be the way to go. I would love a senior dog because I think they might be more inclined to share my own temperament and lifestyle, but I worry about them being able to climb to my third-floor walk-up. I really don't mind carrying my boy or girl if that becomes necessary. But I just want her to be happy when she goes out.

As for the time commitment to a pet, I am a little nervous about that. But I think it'll be terrific, first because I work at home a lot, and second because I have an enormous amount of affection and patience I'd like to lavish on my boy or girl.

Thanks again, and All the Best.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,177 Posts
Some shelters won't adopt to someone without a yard. Be sure and ask before you get emotionally invested in a particular shelter dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
If you do decide to adopt a senior dog I would also suggest a thorough vet check if that's not covered by the shelter. Mind you, a vet check is in order regardless of the dog's age...you don't want to get the ideal dog just to lose it to some illness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
RonE and WesselGordon: Good thought about telling the shelters I have no yard. I thought I'd just tell them my entire living situation, and sort of rely on the shelter volunteers/personnel for good advice as well.

Also, I will certainly get my girl/boy a vet check, and then keep up with them, especially if I'm lucky enough to get a senior dog. The problem for a senior dog is those three flights of stairs. I don't want to push an arthritic dog, or a dog with unsteady bowels, or a dog who simply tires easily, so that she has no energy left to actually play in the park.

Thank you all, and all the Best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Welcome too the group, good idea to check out questions before the decision. A senior dog could be considered at age of 7 so something to think about. I have had many 7 plus dogs that DoD stairs fine but they would need to get used to it. You could carry them to part way if they were not too large.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,384 Posts
The stairs is a consideration. I gave up my military housing placement because it was a condo model that had a second floor and I knew it wouldn't work for my senior that had physical limitations. The housing guy was shocked that I would pass on getting into housing after waiting a year on the list, and was kind enough to find me a single floor house as soon as it came available and contacted me .. always in my head before committing to a new puppy the 365 days for the next 13 years.. you never know how a living creature will turn out (the good, the bad, the very very ugly) lol... commitment is total and full commitment because the are a living creature no matter what... It always keeps me grounded... and the very very ugly may be a lot of long term extra work for you in comparison to another individual, but you still love them to pieces as an individual knowing that you were willing to be ok.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Thank you, Sydneyrocky and PatriciafromCO, for the advice and information. Sydneyrocky: nice to hear from someone who has experience seeing older dogs make flights of stairs OK. Very good to know. (And thank you for the kind welcome.) PatriciafromCO: first, thank you for your service. (Easy to say, but heartfelt nonetheless.) Second, it's good to be reminded that the ugly of owning an older dog might be very very ugly. I have to admit, I am a little nervous, but I'm figuring the nervousness is probably a sensible and forgivable reaction. At bottom, I know I have the love and patience for whatever care my girl or boy needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,384 Posts
Thank you :) i didn't mean (ugly) because they seniors dogs ,, I love the seniors and not all seniors are fragile a lot of them are still very active and healthy with no structural problems.... At the time my Smokey (Sammy cross) he always had HD from a very young age... my GSD;s had good hips at 2 years old and also at 10 years old doing x rays with no arthritis going on in them, It didn't hit me they were old until suddenly after reaching 14 years old in little ways but I now they passed still having good hips and strong structures.. I meant ugly as some dogs at any age need a lot of our help and patience behavioral wise. Majority of dogs of any age from any background just know how to live with you... and then there are those that truly need our extra help to accept them for who they are. I'm always mentally prepared to accept the good the bad and the very ugly...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey, PatriciafromCO: Understood about behavioral problems. I think I'm ready if/when those come up as well, or at least willing, if very inexperienced. I've been doing some reading about how to treat behavioral issues, the trainability of older dogs, and so on. But I'm also aware that reading is not the same thing as experience, so I've made sure that there are teaching clinics in my area for my pet and me. But most important is, as you say, the willingness to just "accept them for who they are." I thank you for the advice on this issue; I think about it A LOT, in part because it would kill me to, with the best of intentions, adopt a dog with extra needs only to find I wasn't up to the task. The idea of getting the girl's hopes up only to return her to a shelter.... I could never do that. Anyway, sorry to sound a little melodramatic, and all the Best.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top