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Discussion Starter #1
For starters I am looking for a rough collie breeder in search of a service dog prospect puppy. (please don't be rude I have a proffesional trainer and am very education on all things service dog)

The breeders is called Our Blessed Acres, and reasons why I though they would be a good breeder were: They health test parents for: CEA, DM, CN and MDR1, they stated that many puppies in past litters have went on to be therapy dogs, they have a one year health guarantee, They seem to really care and have asked mnay questions to make sure you qualify for a puppy, They are socialized with many different animals and children, they also seem to have one litter per year from what I can tell, and they only breed collies and shetland sheepdogs.

I just wanted to know if anyone has any experience with them, Thanks so much!
 

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There isn't much on their website, so hard to say without speaking to them. But, some things I would research more.

1. One year health guarantee...most genetic diseases and the like will pop up around 2 years. I would look for a 2 year health guarantee

2. They breed 2 breeds. That can be a red flag. Not always, but you should take that into consideration.

3. I can't find the actual names of the breeders. You should be able to look up their OFA records by owner to see if they've actually health tested. Don't just take their word for it. There might be another website you can look as well for the eye and MDR1 test, but I don't remember what it is. Hopefully someone else will chime in!

4. Have they put any titles or certifications on their dogs? I didn't see any. Any hard proof that they're dogs are worthy breeding stock? Their website doesn't seem to say much about their dogs at all, other than their headshot photos. If this is going to be a service dog, I would want to see Champion dogs in something like obedience or conformation, or proof that their dogs or have done therapy work. I mean, I know that I haven't spoken with the breeder personally as it sounds like you have, but it doesn't look like they do much of anything based on their website. I could be wrong, but make sure the breeders can SHOW you that their dogs are solid and sound.

Also, therapy isn't the same thing as a service dog. I mean, therapy can be as simple as visiting nursing homes. Service is when the dog is performing a certain task for their handlers. You'll have to ask the breeder what specifically their dogs were doing. Can they prove that their dogs have performed specific tasks for their handlers? I would be looking for parents that have performed the tasks this service prospect puppy will be required to perform, because even dogs specifically bred to be service dogs have a high washout rate, as I'm sure you know.

You should also ask what specifically goes into their socialization process. You want to ask about different flooring surfaces they've been exposed to, like carpet, linoleum, wood, shiny, matte, because if the dog is going to go out in public they will see all kinds! Ask about stairs, loud noises, elevators, escalators, automatic doors, and other things that dogs might be scared of. Of course, I doubt the breeder will be able to expose them to all those things in 8-10 weeks, but I think an effort should be made.

I think you might be better served by visiting with any service dog contacts you have personally, though, than asking a bunch of internet strangers. Some have experience with service dogs, though, so might be able to offer you better information. There are also service dog organizations that can help place people with service dogs, and they may be a better resources. But please research those organizations because some of them can be scams!
 

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There isnt much on their website I was just asking for anyone who has worked with them or just has some general experience,
The reason I didn't see the breeding of two different breeds an issue was because they are of the same type of group and at the very most only produce litters 1 a year with different dams and many good breeders do that, I will ask more about the one year health guarentee when I talk to them next and see about that, They claim they don't use OFA but another organization and If I really decide to get a puppy I plan on getting full proof of that I was just kind of on the fence about them at the moment, I also plan to get proof of the therapy dog claims and try to meet at the very least the Dam of the puppies if not the sire also.

And the reason I brought therapy dog work into this as a consideration is because when therapy dogs visit places they must have no agression, a very good temperment (like be calm with kids pulling their fur and etc), and be an overall calm dog and in that regard service dogs are like therapy dogs and that is the most important thing with service dogs in traning to be calm and confident in public, task training is soooo much easier than socialization and training to be in public.

I also am highly aware of the wash out rate but have decided to owner-train with the guidance and help of a proffesional, for one because waiting lists are 2-5+ years because I think the training, and having the dog around since puppy hood with help alot with my current treatment and help to have a stronger bond, it also allows you to customize task a lot more than dogs from organizations and even sometimes dogs are put in a home and just dont click with the owner so the person is put back on the waiting list for years.
 

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You're right, breeding two breeds isn't always bad, necessarily, its just...meh. If you're good with it, you're good with it. I guess personally, for me, I would have to take into consideration everything else they do.

But yeah, you absolutely want to make them prove to you their dogs are of sound temperament. Based on the limited amount I've seen on their website, I would probably pass. I would want to see dogs that have proven they can perform in busy, very arousing environments, such as at obedience or conformation shows, for example. I want to see that they've been assessed by different judges and have earned titles. I know not all breeders are great with updating websites, but I find it strange they don't mention any of the accomplishments of their dogs, like, at all.

Also, since this is an owner-train, what will you do with the dog if it doesn't turn out to be service dog material? Sometimes dogs don't make great services dogs because they're simply too friendly, like to chase rabbits too much (serious concern with a herding dog), or like to play with other dogs too much. That's fine for pet homes, but this dog will have a job to do! This is also something you should consider talking about with the breeder. Will they buy it back? Will you have to keep it, take the loss, and continue to own a dog that can't be trusted to do its job all the time? Important considerations!
 

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The breeder said they aren't the best with always updating the website but plan on having many things fixed soon, and if it turns out not be service dog material or there are some issues we can't fix, I under no circumastance will continue to work a dog that isn't cut out or doesn't seem to enjoy working. If I am able I would really like to keep the dog because I know I will probably be attached I just don't know if I will be able to care for the dog, the breeder did say though if at anytime a buyer is unable to care for the puppy then they will take it back under any circumstance.

And I have also witnessed a lot of concern and careful placement the breeder does with each puppy and also see that as a good sign, the breeder also informed me that the puppies are socialized with many different animals like cats, ducks and geese and are also socialized with various ages of kids-elderly people and that they also are taken on trips at various locations.
 
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