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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I want to make sure that I am doing thr right thing with my new puppy so I thought I would ask some experts - you guys!

I have 3 main problems/concerns with my new puppy. They are:

1) Whenever she is alone she wails, cries and very seldomly, barks. By alone I mean that if I walk away from her and she is unable to follow me.
2) She often doesn't want to play. When she is with me she just sits on my feet.
3) She does nothing when I leave her by herself - and by nothing, I mean NOTHING. She just sits by the child safety gate seperating her from the rest of the apartment.

Let me give you some background. She is a 2 1/2 month old beagle who we collected from the breeder on Sunday (2 days ago). She was quite happy where she was with her mother and more dominant sister. They had been socialised within their house/garage area but not outside of that. We (my wife and I) brought her home in the car (3 hours) where she was very quiet and happy on my wife's lap.

We live in a 3 bedroom apartment with a balcony (about 12m x 1.5m). Sunday - the dog is called Sunday - has a room with a cardboard box-on-its-side bed with a blanket. The room is about 2m x 2m and we put plastic and then newspaper on the floor. She has a fabric toy and one of those bone things for her teeth. There is also a bowl for food and water. Her room is seperated from the rest of the house by a child safety gate (so she doesn't feel completely enclosed).

We go out on to the balcony to play and (sometimes) I can get her excited in a game with a tennis ball or the fabric toy. I take her out to also try to get her to wee/poo on the balcony (We have had some success there). I try to play with her for about 45min every hour/hour and a half.

She eats her food quickly and drinks water.

She has always got a sad face - maybe that's her beagle look though. And I only see her wagging her tail when we are playing (which she doesn't do often) or when I am tickling her stomach (I believe a sign of submission).

First night - alot of crying and wailing. I got up at 12.00, 2.00, 5.00 and finally at 7.00 to see if she wanted the toilet. She didn't want to go out on the balcony because it was dark.

Last night - relatively quiet(ish) from 22.00 - 3.00. Then alot of noise. I calmed her down (she was desperate to get out). Then quiet until 5.00. Same thing again. They quiet until 8.00.

We have been out for a few walks in the outside world but she is constantly trembling. I have introduced her to other people and the occassional dog as well as sights and sounds in the street.

I am trying to work from home (with little success) but I am mentally and physically exhausted.
Really I want to know...
1) Are these things normal? If so, when should I start to see some improvement?
2) Should I be doing something I am not?
3) Is she going to get better or do I have the beginnings of a dog with seperation anxiety?

Many thanks for your time - I know my forum is long - but how can you guys answer if you don't know the full story!

Neil
 

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What you've described sounds to me like a lot of the reasons why many people on this forum prefer to rescue adult dogs from shelters rather than fool with a puppy!

As for myself, I'm a puppy person, and we've brought both of our dogs home at 8 weeks, so I can relate to some of what you're describing. Our golden used to whine/bark in his crate at night, and he did it for a good many days before he finally realized that it was getting him nowhere. We put the crate at the far end of the house from our bedroom so that our sleep was affected as little as possible.

With our new malamute, it was quite a bit easier. We brought her home, and for the first night in the crate, she whined and barked. The 2nd night was much better. By the third night she was sleeping through the night.

You will be having to get up in the middle of the night for several weeks at least just to take the dog out to potty, but you should basically be doing this based on a schedule that you determine (every 3-4 hours) rather than letting the dog dictate when this happens by whining/barking.

You mentioned that your dog is scared to go outside when it's dark. I'd say to lure her out there with treats, and then give more treats when she potties. Treats will solve a multitude of problems. Use them generously to encourage desired behaviors.
 

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She's a puppy. If you think of her in terms of a human baby equivalent, then yes - its all normal. You need to keep taking her on short walks, and socialize her as much as possible. Living in an apt is not ideal so you have to make an effort to get her outside.
 

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This is completely normal! :) At 10 weeks, she is like an infant. She's in a new home, with new sights, sounds, smells, and people, and at the same time, is missing her mama and sister. Plus, you've had her for 2 days! :) Depending on the pup, it can take a week to a month to settle in. BUT, just because she'll settle in doesn't mean things like independence and potty training don't take even more time. Those things are works in progress.

As for your concerns:
1. Yes, the wailing, whining, crying, barking is normal. She's not been alone, really. She's had mama and sis to keep her company. You and your wife are the only good thing she knows now, and dogs are very social. So, yes, she wants to be with you. The tough thing is, one thing we have to teach pups is a bit of independence, so you have to ignore the crying.
2. It's ok if she doesn't want to play. She's still not really sure what's going on, after 2 days. She's scared and just basically wants to figure it out, and feel safe and secure.
3. Again, it's ok if she just sits by the gate. She needs time to settle in, get to know the routine, etc.

Our puppies always did the trembling thing when we took them out. They're tiny compared to the big world! Make sure you don't let her down on the ground to wander if she's not fully vaccinated (which she probably isn't, at 10 weeks) unless you are sure it's not a well traveled doggy area. Puppies can catch parvo and other illnesses so easily.

Does she sleep in your room, or the doggy room you were mentioning? It can be such a big help to crate train her, and put the crate in your bedroom. You can still ignore the whining, but, even just seeing you, smelling you, and hearing you breath can be a big comfort to her. And, it will probably help her settle in. It doesn't have to be permanent, you can transition her to sleeping elsewhere later....

Also, I'd suggest more toys! And, more variety! You mentioned a fabric toy and a bone...that doesn't give her much to do. Try adding a rope toy, a rubber toy for chewing, and, especially, a kong. The original kong can be filled with treats or peanut butter, and then frozen. It takes awhile to get frozen peanut butter out, so it will keep her occupied, and teach her it's ok to hang out by herself, and play with her kong.....

And, just a quick word on potty training. So many people expect too much too soon (I'm not saying you will :) ). Puppies won't gain full physical control of their bladder/bowel til about 6 months of age, give or take. So, sometimes, they just can't help having accidents. Punishing accidents isn't fair, since it's not their fault, and will only set potty training back.
Also, when they're very young, like yours, sometimes they don't even get signals from their bodies that they have to pee/poop; it just seems to happen. As they age, they start to get the signals, and they learn what to do. But, accidents are still possible, because they don't have physical control down yet. Think of babies...they just kind of go when they go, right? Then with toddlers, mama can say "do you have to go potty?" and they say no, but 5 seconds later, they've peed their pants.... :)
So: 1. take her out on a schedule, every hour, PLUS take her out after waking up (even from naps), after playing/exercising, and after eating/drinking. She may not always have to go when you take her out, but it's not a wasted trip, because you're laying the foundation for what you want her to do. Always say the same potty words, and give lots of praise and the yummiest treat possible if she does it right.
2. Supervise, supervise, supervise! That way, she won't be able to sneak off and pee/poop just out of your sight. And, you'll learn her signals, and can rush her out. Any time you can't actively supervise, that's when she should be contained in the crate or her room.

You're doing great! Just be patient!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the advice everyone. It is good to know that this is nothing out of the ordinary. I have actually read a couple of books on raising a puppy - but I wasn't expecting this. I feel a bit confined to my home at the moment.

Is the general concensus then that the crying, barking, whining and whinging should just be ignored? Just let her get on with it?

I don't have any expectations about the toilet training happening quickly - but I would really like to get the noise calmed down ASAP.

Thanks again. Looking forward to any more advice here.
 

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Hi Neil,

Your story sounds very familiar. Our puppy experience started off just like this.

Yes the crying is normal. We tried a couple things to help her (the puppy) out.
1. We put a clock on top of her kennel. (don't know if it helped, but that was night she quit whining.)
2. Never let her out when she cries. Wait for her to stop crying, even for a moment before responding to her.
3. I couldn't handle more than one night of the whining. so the second night we had her, I put her in the kennel and waited around a corner out of sight for her to start whining. I waited as she whined until the moment she stopped for a breath or break and then I stepped into sight. I didn't say anything to her I just quietly where she could see me making eye contact in a non threatening way. As soon as she started whining I'd step out of sight. When she'd stop I'd step back out. After a few trials, she laid down and I slowly walked away.
She didn't really cry again.

She will come around to you and yours. She needs a while to bond. I'm no expert but with such a similar experience, I will say that our dog was frolicking and playing in under a week.

Give her time and observe her behaviors. As you learn about her she'll be doing the same for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Have wrapped a hot water bottle in the t-shirt I was wearing today and put it in her bed. Played for an hour(ish) and she went to toilet. She is quiet now after about 10min of crying on-and-off. Lets see how night 3 goes!
Thanks for all the support.
Neil
 

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Last night went a bit better.
After food, an hours exhausting playing - for both of us - and going to the toilet, Sunday went to bed at about 22.15pm. After being disturbed by the phone she was quiet again by 22.30. She whimpered once or twice between then and 23.00. She moved about - rustling things until 00.00. After that nothing. She woke up at 5.00 and just moved around and I got up at 6.00 (before she started making a noise) to take her out.
She had peed in the floor twice in thr night but as soon as I took her out at 6.00 she peed and pooed again.

I want to know. Due to a mistake with her vacinations she has only had one that counts. She is going to have one more on 23rd and one a month after that. I want to socialise her so I have been taking her out in my arms. I know I can't really put her down anywhere for the various health problems puppies can get. What about taking her to the beach? Can she run about there? Surely any doogy related illnesses are washed away by the tide? Any thoughts?

Thanks. Neil
 

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Glad to hear that last night went a little smoother!

Regarding the socialization, let me copy a response that I made from another thread:

"The American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior has stated that the benefits of early socialization outweigh the risk of disease. (Read their position here: http://www.avsabonline.org/avsabonli...ialization.pdf )

I am a strong believer in early socialization. A few weeks ago I took my 12-week old malamute puppy to the state fair, and I believe she is much the better for it. For the first couple of weeks we had her, I took her to as many places as possible WITH THE EXCEPTION of places which included strange dogs. She experienced as many new people, places, sounds, and safe dogs (ie dogs we know and who aren't carrying disease) as possible. After she'd had a couple of rounds of shots, we began socializing her with strange dogs as well.

As a result of our extensive socialization, she is now great with people and great with other dogs. This is absolutely mandatory for me, as I'm not going to fight with a 100 lb dog who wants to tear into every other dog she sees while we're on a walk through the park.

Based on everything I've read, you are doing a disservice to your dog if you wait to socialize them. The "golden window" of socialization begins to close at 12 weeks, and is all but closed by 16 weeks. By that time, your dog's attitudes towards people and dogs will be set, and you very likely may find yourself with a dog who is going to be fearful, avoidant, and/or aggressive for the rest of it's life."
 

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Glad to hear it was better! :) I guess I'm a bit more on the cautious side of vaccination vs. socialization, because my brother and a friend both lost puppies to parvo and it was horrible. But, you could call your vet and ask about the occurrence of parvo and other diseases in your specific area. If the number of cases isn't bad, you could feel a bit safer.

Also, a 10 week old puppy sometimes needs a middle of the night bathroom trip. I noticed you said she had peed on the floor during the night. Many of us here have dealt with that, and set an alarm to be able to take a young puppy out. It's not fun getting up in the middle of the night, but, in my opinion, it's better than letter her think it's ok to pee on the floor. Plus, they usually grow out of needing a middle of the night bathroom trip pretty quickly, and can hold it better at night than they can during the day!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So I like to think that after 6 days of bringing her (Sunday) home things are gradually getting better. I one thing that isn't really improving much is the crying and whining (the dog, not me) in the mornings and at nigth when she is left alone in her room. During the day she is fine - she has sleeps in her room and there is generally no complaining - well, maybe a few minutes but then she settles. This morning, for example, she cried for nearly an hour before finally decided I had had enough and let her out.
Is this amount of crying/seperation anxiety normal? I have spoken to people who got 10-12 week old puppies and they tell me that after the first night/two nights, there was no more crying.
Thanks for the continued help and reassurance.

Neil
 

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I'm glad it's getting a bit better! :)
Each puppy is different, at any age. And, really, it's not so much about what age she is, as it is how long you've had her....age isn't as important as the time she's been with you. Even a 6 month old puppy can freak out when they're in a brand new home. Heck, even an adult dog can.
Our first puppy took to sleeping in the crate right away and only whined to pee. Our second puppy whined for at least 2 weeks at night time.

One thing that might help for night time would be to allow her, for the time being, to sleep in your room, in a crate. You don't have to allow this forever, you can slowly transition her to sleeping back in her own room. But, for now, it will probably speed up the adjustment period. Even just seeing, smelling, and hearing you can be a big comfort to her.

Bottom line, crying and whining is completely normal. How long it takes to get over it depends on the puppy, and on your response to it. Ignoring it is so important.
When she cries when you're gone, make sure you're leaving her something to do in her room. Give her a frozen stuffed kong, and a variety of toys, or even a bully stick. And, tire her out with a walk and some play time before you have to leave her. A tired puppy will cry less.
 

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Honestly, I would say that those people whose puppies stopped crying at night after only 1 or 2 nights are VERY VERY lucky because that's certainly NOT the norm!

My pup cried every night without fail for the first 2 weeks. The only way he would shut up was when I put his crate right beside my bed and put my fingers through the crate holes to make him feel better. He'd just lick my fingers until he fell asleep and then all was good.

Just tough it out for a couple more weeks. It does get A LOTTTT better and soon you wouldn't even remember her ever being like this!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi everyone,

Thanks for the continual support. I have a question about jumping up and biting. As Sunday's confidence has grown over the last 9 days we have noticed a - well, felt, that her 'play' biting is getting stronger and she is jumping up and biting clothes and hands. I like to think that is is all part of play and that we don't have a man-eater!
I have tried a firm 'no,' saying 'ouch' loudly, walking away from her and putting her in the sin-bin for 30 seconds - and some of these in combination. As of yet, no success. Sometimes she just continues and continues irrespective of what I am saying or doing.
Thanks.

Neil
 

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Have you checked out the sticky "The Bite Stops Here"? It has some valuable info.
Basically, biting is puppy play. It's so normal and natural to them that it can take some time to work on. Here's a good basic plan, there are ways to tweak it depending on your own situation.
- when she bites, say ouch loudly. Here's where you can tweak it: some people suggest yelping in a high pitch as a puppy would if injured. That worked for us, but for some puppies the high pitch excites them even more. So, some people prefer saying ouch, or some other noise.
- go back to whatever you were doing. She will mostly likely bite again within seconds. Make the noise again, but this time leave the room for 20-3- seconds.
- come back and go about your business. She'll probably bite again. Start the whole thing over with just the noise.
- When she bites again, make the noise, and leave (yes, again) for 20-30 seconds.

With our first guy it took about 4 weeks. And, yes, sometimes when we were playing we'd have to leave the room 5-10 times in one session. It's a hassle, and my fiance hated it, because it cut into his TV time! :) But, doing the same thing every single time is so important, as is lots of repetition.

She will continue on biting irrespective of what you're saying or doing because she thinks she's just playing, and it's normal to her. With repetition, she will learn human contact ends if she bites. It's a learning process, and you have to give it time to sink in. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hi,

Thanks for all the advice so far. It has been really useful.
At 12 weeks old Sunday is now sleeping better through the night without making much noise until about 7.00 - 7.20. A vast improvement on 2 weeks ago.

Our newest hurdles to get over - walking and going to the toilet outside.

1) Walking. My methods aren't working very well. We go out for nice long walks but she reacts in some really frustrating ways. a) he sits on the floor or refuses to go in the direction I want. b) She eats everything ... and I mean EVERYTHING she comes across. She is more efficient than the local rubbish collectors! Now I know we chose a beagle and they are floor-sniffers, but how can we get her to walk properly???!!

2) Sunday only wants to go to toilet indoors. She doesn't really care if it's on newspaper, the terrace or just on the floor. As long as it isn't out on the street, she's happy. We have gone on the longest walks in the morning and she has done nothing - barely in the front door and she is squatting down. Sometimes I have to spend over an hour going out - coming home - seeing that she wants to go to the toilet - going out again - coming home - seeing... (you get the picture) before she actually goes outiside. Any suggestions?

We are working on the play biting and jumping up. I think it is going to be a long road to getting it stopped, but I think it is just her way of playing.

She still cries when she is alone - even if it is just for 2 min (during the day). But the crying doesn't last long and then she shuts up. Think that will improve too.

On a positive note she now sits and lays down on command. The 2 successes of the last 2 weeks.

Looking forward to hearing from people.

Neil
 
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