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When she explained why they are out of work, did I continue to "call out"? No...I saw that they actually had a good reason for doing it now, and did not bring it up again.

If she simply ignored my advice I would not have replied, but instead she called it impossible, ridiculous, and impractical. Yet I'm being judgemental? Yes, she did reject my advice, so I suggested she go back to the other advice. Not sure where there is a problem.

I said she was rejecting MY advice because despite her resolution that it would not work, she continued to ask about it and then argue why it won't work. If you think it won't work, don't discuss it more. If you actually have questions about it, I'm going to assume you would consider it, not just immediately go back to "impossible".
 

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I apologize if I'm being harsh, but in defense of Jessi:

1. You can't claim you don't have the money for expensive vet tests, while saying that you put aside enough money to cover the dog's expenses while you and your husband were between jobs. By definition, that is NOT putting money away for the dog. That's not jumping to conclusions; that's drawing exactly the right conclusion based on the pertinent information. Moreover, the tests being recommended - thyroid and lyme disease screening - are potentially life-threatening. And if your husband is in construction during the worst construction market in over thirty years, and you are (I assume) an adjunct or associate professor when every endowment in every university has dropped at least 40%, then, yes, it is entirely reasonable to question whether this was the best time for a new dog. And if you're a full professor, then, to put it bluntly, I have trouble believing that you can't afford the tests.
2. Is it impractical to separate your dogs all but 30 minutes a day? Absolutely. But if you're seriously worried about aggression, it may be necessary. You're asking for advice on what to do short of giving the dog up. That's exactly what you got. There are no magic solutions here that involves solving a serious situation with minimal effort. If you can't put the time into it, then you should absolutely give up the dog.
3. In truth, I'm not actually sure the full isolation Jessi recommends is the best answer, but I'm really, really troubled by the 'we have a life, too' defense. There are two adults in your household who, as you have stated, are not currently working. To me, that means that at least one of you will have time to monitor your dog for the entire day. If the isolation & gradual re-introduction is your last option, you have a choice to either put the time into it, or not.
 

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Hardymom..there is a block member option that you can use right about now.


Jesi...You were very rude right from the absolute start. Get over her not taking your advice.. Your very first post, the very first line proved to her that you are not capable of being heard.
 

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I don't care if she takes my advice or not, honestly. I told her there was lots of good advice on here.

I'm not sure what my questioning the idea of getting a dog when no one is working proves except concern for the dog's well being. If you can't afford a vet, you can't afford a dog. But as I already said, she explained why and I see no problem with it. I do think you should have money set aside, but oh well. Not sure how that impacts the other part of my post.

Pretty sure the thread isn't about me, guys. It's about the dog. If you have a problem with my "attitude", report it. The moderators have no problem editing and deleting my posts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 · (Edited)
I am not going to explain myself further. This is just getting way out of hand! I know that "pet people" get as emotional about pet care, as moms do on forums discussing their kids, and this is what it is turning into.

Please, everyone, just drop it. I am very sorry for stirring up this controversy. I should have seen where it was going and just stopped replying, but I admit the personal attacks made me reckless. Thank you to those who were helpful. To everyone else, I will just say that I am giving you credit for being intelligent and responsible; please do the same for me.

Have a good evening, everyone!

PS Jesirose - I apologize for calling your solution ridiculous. I don't think it would be practical for us, but obviously it has worked for you and for others, so it isn't ridiculous.
 

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I understand what jesirose is trying to explain to you and she is correct. Your thread says "dog being bit, must stop now" There is no magic wand She is giving you advice on how to stop the biting now The only 100% foolproof method is to seperate the dogs. This is a necessary evil until things settle in and calm down and dogs adjust.

As a trainer who has occasionally had some butt kicking dogs in home at the same time the answer is to crate dog at different times so that both dogs can get quality time while not being crated. When you have 2 large protection dogs that may not like each other being out at same time is not an option. This immediately stops any biting.

What you have to do is going to take time. The idea is to keep each dog safe while other dog is out with owners. You said you were keeping beagle crated while husky was out so keep on doing what you're doing. Your beagle is also in the teen-age years, that is not helping and then you and husband are used to an older, quieter, mannerly type dog and all of a sudden you have the wild and woolly beagle. The whole family is going through an adjustment period.

I would advise getting back in your own bed and stop all the worrying about the beagle he will survive in his crate in the living room. You and other half have to get a good nights sleep because you need your strength to handle all the everyday problems. I would worry more about the older dog's needs as he has earned a retirement program.

I have said this many times 1 dog good, 2 dogs sometimes 2 steps the other side of insanity. Especially in a small home/apartment whatever. You may be mentally and environmentally over dogged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Dear Wvasko,
Thank you for your reply. You explained it in a way that makes sense to me, and addresses my concerns about the older dog. I do feel he has earned a peaceful retirement. And you are right, my original post was worded in an urgent manner. I was upset this morning when I posted it.
The irony is that while all this discussion has been happening today, the two dogs have been getting along beautifully!
The reason I felt it necessary to sleep near the beagle is that he was clawing his crate so frantically, I was afraid he'd catch a claw in the wires and tear it. Our older dog tore a claw once, which required surgery to repair, and I didn't want this dog to do the same thing. I also didn't want to add to his separation anxiety by traumatizing him, after he was "leashed on" to us all day, by then banishing him to another room. He is doing better now, however.
Thanks again. I know there is no "magic wand" but I wanted to see if anyone had any advice different from that which I had already received, and which might shed some new light on the situation.
Again, I apologize for getting heated.
 

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PS Jesirose - I apologize for calling your solution ridiculous. I don't think it would be practical for us, but obviously it has worked for you and for others, so it isn't ridiculous.
I appreciate the thought. I'm sorry something upset you.

Glad to hear they're doing well today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
Thanks, Jesirose! :)

To everyone: As a teacher, I can't help wanting to sum up today's experience. I was reminded of some of the basic principles of discussion - whether in person or Internet-based - that we all forget sometimes, including me!

* You can question an opinion, statement or idea, but don't question the intelligence, character or motives of the person making it.

* Always give the other person the benefit of the doubt.

* Before you respond to a statement that seems inflammatory, try saying it out loud with a couple of different inflections. Could you be taking something as an insult that was meant as humor, or simply an honest question?

* If someone offers you an explanation for something that was an issue in the discussion, acknowledge their explanation before going on. Otherwise, it seems as if you are ignoring everything but your own point in the argument.

* Try humor!

* If you are wrong, apologize.

* Don't post when you are upset.

* If all else fails, turn off the computer and go play with your dog!
 

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Beagles can be high energy. If you aren't walking him for at least 45 min briskly in the am and pm, start. Also do some training with him on his recall (Come) as well as teaching tricks.

The training on the recall will help if he gets too wound up and you are worried he'll harass your other dog. Training for anything (obedience or tricks) works them mentally to tire them out.

If your older dog isn't physically up to taking long brisk walks, take the beagle only twice a day, and add in a short walk with both of them.

Institute NILF (found on these forums on sticky).
 

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Sorry I didn't come back to this thread earlier. You've received some very good advice from Cracker, jesi and wvasko. Your beagle is very high-energy, pretty much hitting his physical prime... too energetic for your senior husky. Both dogs need to spend some time away from each other. No need to change sleeping arrangements, no need to worry about leadership or dominance. Take it easy like wvasko said.

Yeah, the beagle-mix definitely needs to run off some energy and start using his brain. This will wear him out and cut down on hyperactivity.
 

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Good post.
 

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Jesi, I love you, but I have to disagree with this. While I do agree that intros need to be done slowly, I think 30 minutes a day is a very, very low amount. I think it's about accurate for play/interaction time, but that the dogs SHOULD be spending time together CALMLY- each dog on a family member's lap for petting, going on (on leash) walks together, etc. A babygate is great for this- one dog on each side means that no one is totally isolated from the family, and swapping out frequently. An exercise pen is another good option.

All that said, SO much depends on the individual dogs.
 

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I have always stated that crates etc are weapons not only to keep dogs separated or out of troubled areas and the most important use of is so owners can step back relax their mental attitudes and then jump back into the fray. I don't think time limits or lack of is the problem. It's the calm rested mental attitude of the owners who are refereeing the dog games. When the owners stress levels go up that's when a loss of temper or mistakes can happen. You put one dog away and everything calms down. There are times as a trainer if a minor/major emergency happens at home and my stress is up I don't train that day. It doesn't happen often or I'm out of business, but the dogs I'm training are out in the kennels not in my home so it's easy for me to eliminate the problem. Not so with dogs in home. As a trainer I am on a rigid time schedule but owners with their dogs at home have all the time in the world as there is no rush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 · (Edited)
Yes, the beagle is getting plenty of exercise, both walks and playing fetch. His motto is, "If you've got the ball, I've got the time!"

I just want to address the whole issue of time spent with the dogs, because it's really bothering me. I made the statement that "the humans in this house have lives, too" and was criticized for it, implying that I am not willing to spend time to acclimate our new family member.

What I meant by "we have a life too" is that the leashing technique of training a new dog is very limiting for the human companion. I understand the principle - if the dog is leashed all the time it is much easier to correct behavior, which has been effective so far. But the problem is that it is difficult to do anything around the house while holding a leash, even if it's looped over your arm, and while the dog and leash are perpetually underfoot! You can't move freely about the house, or do anything that requires two hands - since the dog can jerk you at any time, causing you to drop or spill whatever you are holding. As well, the dog gets into everything you're doing.

So what I meant was that, although I am currently not working, I have only a few weeks before the start of my very busy summer session of classes. There are a number of tasks I need to get done before then. My husband and I take turns when we are both home, but it still is very restricting.

While I can't say it's been unpleasant playing with the dog and doing minimal chores for the past week and a half, I need to get back into my normal life again. I *hope* everyone here can understand and sympathize with that!
 

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Jesi, I love you, but I have to disagree with this. While I do agree that intros need to be done slowly, I think 30 minutes a day is a very, very low amount. I think it's about accurate for play/interaction time, but that the dogs SHOULD be spending time together CALMLY- each dog on a family member's lap for petting, going on (on leash) walks together, etc. A babygate is great for this- one dog on each side means that no one is totally isolated from the family, and swapping out frequently. An exercise pen is another good option.

All that said, SO much depends on the individual dogs.
Well it doesn't have to be 30 minutes, that was just the number I started at for the first day, then slowly moved to much longer times. I didn't say keep them together for 30 minutes only EVER. ;)

I agree about the baby gate but I think she said their house is not very many rooms.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Well it doesn't have to be 30 minutes, that was just the number I started at for the first day, then slowly moved to much longer times. I didn't say keep them together for 30 minutes only EVER. ;)

I agree about the baby gate but I think she said their house is not very many rooms.
Both dogs are big enough to jump over the gates. ;)
 

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The thing about the leashing is that it is SO much easier to leash a dog to you for a few weeks (for a really smart dog without much drive who is old enough not to chew) than it is to try and fix things once he realizes that he can get far enough away from you that he can get into stuff for a few mintutes or more before you react. Slp the leash handle onto a belt, or get a Euro-style lead with a ring in the middle that you can clip the leash to. Use a head halter, a no-pull harness, or a prong collar (this would actually be my pick- your'e NOT pulling on it, but the dog is learning that yanking you around just DOES NOT WORK) to avoid the yanking around.
 
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