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In reading about ethical breeders, so-called designer dogs, and new breed development, there is an issue I've never seen addressed. When truly creating a new breed (not designer dogs), what is the responsible / ethical thing to do with the resulting puppies?

My understanding is that reputable breeds will keep one or two puppies from each litter and sell the rest to other breeders or screened homes. So what are groups working to create a new breed to do with their puppies? Sell / give them to others in their group? Sell / give them to interested people outside their group? Certainly not all "in progress" puppies will be suitable for furthering the process.

I have no plans to start breeding (I don't even have a dog yet), but this is something I've wondered about since I started reading about dogs and breeders.
 

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Back in the day when most of the breeds established today, most often the puppies were culled (or put down). Today I'd venture to say most of the pups are either sold as 'designer' breeds (as they seem to be so popular today) or given away.
 

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The majority of purebreds aren't breeding quality either. I'm sure they sell non-breeding-quality pups to pet/sport homes just like the purebred breeders do.
 

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Back in the day when most of the breeds established today, most often the puppies were culled (or put down).
I'm not sure that's true. Maybe if a certain breeder was really trying hard for a particular quality, he'd kill the pups that didn't have that quality. But back before vaccines were available, a LOT of puppies died of distemper and you kind of needed to have extras around to make up for that. So probably those that survived getting distemper went to pet homes.
 

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Back in the day when most of the breeds established today, most often the puppies were culled (or put down). Today I'd venture to say most of the pups are either sold as 'designer' breeds (as they seem to be so popular today) or given away.
I would suggest the idea that "most" of the puppies were culled can be debated - depending on the breed or 'type' in development.

In small breeds where 2 or 3 pups are common I would suggest there has always been a market for the pups not bred forward on. There is a long documented history (thousands of years) of small companion dogs being in enough demand that they were used as 'trade goods' on trade routes and found their way around the world on ships for the same reason.

The term 'designer dog' might be fairly new, but designer dogs (small or unusual dogs sold as a commodity for prestige) have been a part of the market for a very, very long time.

I baffles me all of the hoopla made about this being a new trend. I understand that the media love to sensationalize and that there are others that can further their cause by pretending this is all new, but it is not. With the tiniest bit of research into the history of toy/small breeds that becomes very apparent.




- Early 1800s


- Postcard, 'The Proud Mother' - early 1900s - Spaniel x Terrier pups


- Title 'Buy A Dog Ma'am', Richard Ansell, dated 1860

My understanding is that reputable breeds will keep one or two puppies from each litter and sell the rest to other breeders or screened homes.
Again, please keep in mind all that you read needs to be taken with a grain of salt and hopefully thought through logically and filtered through with your own set of values. I have yet to see anyone come through with a description of a 'reputable' breeder that I would completely agree on. This idea about keeping a pup or two each litter is another example of someone shopping blanket advice that doesn't work across all breeds. Again, in small breeds, OFTEN a couple of litters (or more) are needed before a pup is kept. I would suggest it is correct that those breeders that are breeding forward with care will be selling to screened homes.

SOB
 

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I don't breed so I don't know for sure, but as far as new breeds today go, the puppies are probably treated just like the "finished product" puppies the breeder doesn't want to keep--sold as pet quality animals with a spay/neuter contract.
 

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Thanks for the clarification - makes perfect sense. I think I was reading too much into the comments about breeders of so-called designer dogs doing it it just to sell dogs that I assumed that "new breed developers" wouldn't sell the pups. Or something - hard to know what I'm thinking sometimes :)

The majority of purebreds aren't breeding quality either. I'm sure they sell non-breeding-quality pups to pet/sport homes just like the purebred breeders do.
Absolutely true - I'm sure there are many litters without show/breeding quality pups that become wonderful companions.

Again, please keep in mind all that you read needs to be taken with a grain of salt and hopefully thought through logically and filtered through with your own set of values. I have yet to see anyone come through with a description of a 'reputable' breeder that I would completely agree on. This idea about keeping a pup or two each litter is another example of someone shopping blanket advice that doesn't work across all breeds. Again, in small breeds, OFTEN a couple of litters (or more) are needed before a pup is kept. I would suggest it is correct that those breeders that are breeding forward with care will be selling to screened homes.

SOB
Of course. "Reputable breeder" is something each of us must determine for ourselves by looking at the big picture. I know some people who would say there's no such thing as a reputable breeder because animals should never be purposely bred. I also know that there are breeders who have completely legitimate reasons for violating certain aspects of a code of ethics. It's all in the looking at the big picture and the rationale behind decisions.

Thanks for the pictures. I love "The Proud Mother" she really does look pleased with herself.
 
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