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I know this won't convince anyone who believes that Purina is the evil empire deliberately producing "crap" that endangers the health of our pets, forcing them to derive all of their protein needs from corn. I also know this is a press release and that I am becoming a Purina "fan boy." But this just doesn't seem like something a bad actor would do.

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Nestlé Purina and Field to Market will work together to engage supply chain to advance the sustainability of cereals and grains used in pet food.

WASHINGTON (PRWEB) September 15, 2015

Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture announced today that Nestlé Purina Petcare, a premiere manufacturer of pet products, has joined the Alliance. As an active member in Field to Market, Nestlé Purina will work together with grower organizations, academia, conservation groups, public sector partners and other leading companies representing over $1.3 trillion in combined revenue to deliver sustainable outcomes for U.S. agriculture.

"Growing the ingredients used in our products takes significant amounts of energy, water and nutrients and generally represents a large share of the total environmental impact of these products," said Jack Scott, director of sustainability, Nestlé Purina. "By joining Field to Market, we will work closely with our suppliers and others to better understand our grain supply chain and improve the impact these ingredients have on the environment."

Field to Market's diverse membership of grower organizations, leading companies, academia, conservation groups and public sector partners provides a platform that unites the agricultural supply chain in creating opportunities for continuous improvement in productivity, environmental quality and human well-being.

"Nestlé Purina has the opportunity to positively influence and catalyze continuous improvement in agricultural production," said Rod Snyder, president of Field to Market. "We are pleased to welcome Nestlé Purina to Field to Market and look forward to working with them to engage farmers within their supply chain to advance the sustainability of cereals and grains used in pet food."

About Field to Market
Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture brings together a diverse group of grower organizations; agribusinesses; food, beverage, restaurant and retail companies; conservation groups; universities and public sector partners to focus on defining, measuring and advancing the sustainability of food, fiber and fuel production. Field to Market is comprised of nearly 80 members representing all facets of the U.S. agricultural supply chain, with member companies employing 4.1 million people and representing combined revenues totaling over $1.3 trillion. For more information, visit http://www.fieldtomarket.org and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/FieldtoMarket.

Nestlé Purina Joins Field to Market | Benzinga - http://is.gd/twWxd0
 

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I noticed the last time I was in at the Vets, they have a brochure out on corn and how it is good for dogs. Interesting reading and they do seem to have some good points in it.
 

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Dog food world is a crazy place. Even people who are trying to be scientific (eg. Linda Page's Dog Food Logic) fall into metrics like 'digestibility'. But who is to say that it's bad for a dog to excrete a larger fraction of something they ingest? It may be that more poop from more indigestible roughage or 'ash' (ie bone) is better. Sure, you're getting less metabolic bang for your buck if a fair portion of what you feed passes right through. That may actually save your dog from obesity. So many companies putting their spin on some brand and product. No one is doing the sort of long term feeding stories that are required to really determine what diet is healthier.

As for Purina . . . it's hard for any company that is beholden to stockholders to consistently put product quality ahead of economics. So there's reason to question the motives of all companies, large and small. I think it's great when any company moves in a more sustainable fashion. On the other hand, MacDonalds giving up styrafoam doesn't make the Big Mac a great dietary staple.
 

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Dog food world is a crazy place. Even people who are trying to be scientific (eg. Linda Page's Dog Food Logic) fall into metrics like 'digestibility'. But who is to say that it's bad for a dog to excrete a larger fraction of something they ingest? It may be that more poop from more indigestible roughage or 'ash' (ie bone) is better. Sure, you're getting less metabolic bang for your buck if a fair portion of what you feed passes right through. That may actually save your dog from obesity. So many companies putting their spin on some brand and product. No one is doing the sort of long term feeding stories that are required to really determine what diet is healthier.

As for Purina . . . it's hard for any company that is beholden to stockholders to consistently put product quality ahead of economics. So there's reason to question the motives of all companies, large and small. I think it's great when any company moves in a more sustainable fashion. On the other hand, MacDonalds giving up styrafoam doesn't make the Big Mac a great dietary staple.
C'mon now. Under what circumstances is excreting more than you eat a good thing? That's not how digestion works. You may as well say, "well, who's to say choking to death on CO2 is actually bad? maybe that's good."

As for Purina and what they're doing, hold back on the fanboy status, there, OP. Purina is (a) trying to appeal to the growing Acana/Canidae/Earthborn crowd, (b) knows that a lot of governments are requiring sustainability in agriculture, and (c) trying to prevent the US government from doing so by "voluntarily" doing it themselves. Corporations don't operate to make the world a better place. If they happen to do that as a side effect of doing business, they won't stop it, but that is never their goal.
 

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Well, it IS true that the American agricultural system is entirely unsustainable. Nobody in the country could afford meat if it weren't so heavily subsidized by the government (under the Roman "panem et circenses" working model---keep the populace well-fed and well-entertained so they don't revolt). It costs more in fuel to grow/harvest/transport/dry/etc. corn than the corn is worth. Then they feed that to the cattle who also need to be watered, vetted, transported, and so on. That's not cheap. And we're using a huge percentage of the best arable land in the country only for meat-animal feed, when it could be used to grow stuff that humans could eat, and ruining that land for anything else in the process. So if they truly are trying to find ways to do things better, I applaud them. But the cynical side of me (which is almost all :p) says that they just want to be able to point to their "efforts" when someone tries to legislate more sustainable practices. A lot of "alliances" and similarly named groups are just fancy names for some rich guy's pet agenda (which is usually to get richer and still look good to the public).

But I don't know anything about the Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture or Field to Market. Maybe they are totally legit.
 

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Substainability is the new corporate buzz word for the moment and I agree there's a reason that any and all corporations will use it with very few for the good of the world ... unless a profit can be made.

I never studied nutrition but it does make sense that if we utilize the nutrients that any food should be less going out then going in. It may be wrong, but it makes sense about the digestability of food.
 

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C'mon now. Under what circumstances is excreting more than you eat a good thing? That's not how digestion works. You may as well say, "well, who's to say choking to death on CO2 is actually bad? maybe that's good."
Human doctors tell us to eat more fiber (undigestible) all the time. More processed, generally means more digestible . . . and the obesity epidemic is often linked to the dominance of highly processed foods.

I didn't say excreting more than you eat. Just excreting a larger fraction. It's widely written that we don't digest carrots very well if they aren't cooked. I don't see a lot of people saying "don't eat raw carrots". Yes, availability is an issue when you're talking about micronutrients. But for carbs? The health community doesn't exactly say: "stick to white bread and polished rice because they are more digestible and produce nice firm stools". I'll buy evaluation to see if amino acids are correctly balanced, or the equivalent with lipids . . . and there are circumstances in which a bland diet with little roughage is desirable. But I've seen dogs thrive on a diet comprised largely of chicken frames . . . their poop comes out in hard white pellets which suggests a lot of bone is coming out the other end. Dogs on this diet do fine . . . seems to result in great coat condition. (Back in my dog intensive days, I used to pick up chicken frames from the factory, hundreds of kilos a week, deliver some to various show-oriented breeders, and use some for my own personal dogs and some of the dogs boarding in my boarding kennel). Raw meaty bones are NOT highly digestible. If you go to hard core prey model diets . . . the dog is pooping out hair along with excess calcium. I'm not taking a stand here. I'm just doubting the value of "digestibility" as a metric for the quality of a dogfood.
 

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I know this won't convince anyone who believes that Purina is the evil empire deliberately producing "crap" that endangers the health of our pets, forcing them to derive all of their protein needs from corn. I also know this is a press release and that I am becoming a Purina "fan boy." But this just doesn't seem like something a bad actor would do.

-------------

Nestlé Purina and Field to Market will work together to engage supply chain to advance the sustainability of cereals and grains used in pet food.

WASHINGTON (PRWEB) September 15, 2015

Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture announced today that Nestlé Purina Petcare, a premiere manufacturer of pet products, has joined the Alliance. As an active member in Field to Market, Nestlé Purina will work together with grower organizations, academia, conservation groups, public sector partners and other leading companies representing over $1.3 trillion in combined revenue to deliver sustainable outcomes for U.S. agriculture.

"Growing the ingredients used in our products takes significant amounts of energy, water and nutrients and generally represents a large share of the total environmental impact of these products," said Jack Scott, director of sustainability, Nestlé Purina. "By joining Field to Market, we will work closely with our suppliers and others to better understand our grain supply chain and improve the impact these ingredients have on the environment."

Field to Market's diverse membership of grower organizations, leading companies, academia, conservation groups and public sector partners provides a platform that unites the agricultural supply chain in creating opportunities for continuous improvement in productivity, environmental quality and human well-being.

"Nestlé Purina has the opportunity to positively influence and catalyze continuous improvement in agricultural production," said Rod Snyder, president of Field to Market. "We are pleased to welcome Nestlé Purina to Field to Market and look forward to working with them to engage farmers within their supply chain to advance the sustainability of cereals and grains used in pet food."

About Field to Market
Field to Market: The Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture brings together a diverse group of grower organizations; agribusinesses; food, beverage, restaurant and retail companies; conservation groups; universities and public sector partners to focus on defining, measuring and advancing the sustainability of food, fiber and fuel production. Field to Market is comprised of nearly 80 members representing all facets of the U.S. agricultural supply chain, with member companies employing 4.1 million people and representing combined revenues totaling over $1.3 trillion. For more information, visit http://www.fieldtomarket.org and follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/FieldtoMarket.

Nestlé Purina Joins Field to Market | Benzinga - http://is.gd/twWxd0
EWWW no! i dont care how much they try to save face, as long as they make crap like beneful and pass it off as "healthy", I cant get behind them.
 
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